Warhorse pride vol 2 issue 12 20140606

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Warhorse pride vol 2 issue 12 20140606

  1. 1. Serving the Soldiers, Civilians and Families of 2nd ABCT, 4th Inf. Div. Vol. 2, Issue 6 March 14, 2014 Warhorse PrideServing The 2nd Armored Brigade 4th Infantry Division END OF TOUR EDITION
  2. 2. Small Steps Warrior LeaderStory and phots by Sgt. Marcus Fichtl 2nd Armored Brigade Public Affairs Office Pride 2
  3. 3. Spc. Violeta Loya, Garden Grove, Calif. native, unit supply specialist, 3rd Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, 11th ADA Brigade, Fort Bliss, Texas, and deployed to Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, marches with her platoon to warfighting training lanes during the first class of the Warrior Leader Course, Noncommissioned Officer Academy, U.S. Army Central, at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May. 21, 2014.
  4. 4. It ends with a few small steps across a stage, a handshake and a piece of paper, but in the same way that’s how it starts – a few small steps. Spc. Violeta Loya walks across the Warrior Stage May 23 at Camp Buehring, Kuwait. At 5’1, her steps might be some of the smallest out of the Warrior Leader Course graduates, but they’re the first and over the next six months, 900 Soldiers will follow her lead. Loya, a unit supply specialist with the 3rd Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, 11th ADA Brigade, stationed in Fort Bliss, Texas, and deployed to Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, but her story didn’t start in Texas or Qatar. It begins 8,000 miles away in Garden Grove, California. The youngest daughter of a southern California family, she decided to take a chance, a step in a new direction, to become the first person in her family to join the military. Stunned, confused and angry, her family didn’t speak to her for days, but eventually they came around. As Loya crossed the parade field after basic training, they saw her for the first time in her uniform – black beret, tan boots, U.S. Army across her chest and an American flag on her right shoulder. They changed - Loya changed. “My parents hugged me and told me how proud they were,” said Loya. “I realized I was about to do something no one in my family ever thought of doing.” As time passes in a Soldier’s career, they must transition to a leader if they want to progress. “The Warrior Leader Course is the first level of NCO development,thefirststepintheprofessionaldevelopment of core attributes, morals and ethics,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Tim Hileman, commandant U.S. Army Central, Noncommissioned Officer Academy and Pennsylvania Guardsman. “We give Soldiers, after 22 days of training, the tools that they need to be a first line leaders.” The NCOA at Camp Buehring is a unique academy. The only NCOA where all Army components, guard, reserve and active are equally represented, not only in its students, but its cadre as well. The backgrounds and teaching styles may differ, but they all teach one thing - leadership. Army leadership, in a way, has been boiled down to a few short phrases, “deeds not words.” And according to Hileman, it’s as simple as “be, know, do.” The emphasis is on action. The first tools the NCOA gave Loya was a pat on the back, the position of platoon sergeants, 32 Soldiers and the simple phrase, “lead them.” “Adapt and overcome,” Loya told herself. “I feared that if I made a mistake, the sergeants would laugh,” she said. “I got up there and decided I wasn’t going to let rank intimidate me,” said Loya. But when she called “fall in,” the Soldiers fell in, when she called “forward march,” forward they did march. “I came to find out, I was very wrong about my platoon, they didn’t question me, they respected me,” she said. “When I made mistakes, they showed me the ropes. When I needed guidance, they guided me.” They guided each other in the sand, in the classroom and on the battlefield. Presentations, tests and open discussion dominated the day, Soldiers from watercraft operators to military policemen recalled experiences that on the face were as different as their jobs, but at heart as similar as the oath they all took. “The class showed wearing the stripes does not determine a great leader,” said Loya. “The rank does not define true leadership, true leadership is defined within the person.” Hileman said the NCOA focused on teaching the troop leading procedures and to do what’s right when no one is looked. “The goal for us is for sergeants to understand the expectations of being a noncommissioned officer, but then not to only understand those expectations, but put them into practice and being a more resilient Soldier by the time they leave,” said Hileman. T Pride 4
  5. 5. Sgt. Thomas Wallace, New Berlin, N.Y., native, watercraft operator, 45th Sustainment Brigade, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, deployed to Camp Patriot, Kuwait, crosses a field as part of the warfighting training lanes during the first class of the Warrior Leader Course, Noncommissioned Officer Academy, U.S. Army Central, at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May. 21. A Soldier assaults through a door as part of the warfighting training lanes during the first class of the Warrior Leader Course, Noncommissioned Officer Academy, U.S. Army Central, at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May. 21. Soldiers breach into a urban compound as part of the warfighting training lanes during the first class of the Warrior Leader Course, Noncommissioned Officer Academy, U.S. Army Central, at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May. 21.
  6. 6. “Being the first person in the first class to walk across that stage is more powerful than anyone can imagine.” Pride 6
  7. 7. The course transformed Loya’s entire concept of leadership as she changed as much as she did on her basic training’s parade field. “To be a leader did not mean much to me because coming up in the Army I didn’t really experience great leadership, I didn’t know what it meant. Now, being a leader has so much meaning to me. A leader is someone who leads, motivates, and influences,” said Loya. Asshecompletedtheclass,Loyamadethecommandants list, a recognition reserved for the top-twenty percent of the students in the course. No small feat, but in one final twist sitting in rehearsals for the final ceremony she learned she would also receive the Ironman Award for the highest Army Physical Fitness Test score. She was placed in front of the entire 127 Soldier class, not just the 32 of her platoon. She would represent the Academy for its entire stay in Kuwait. “Being the first person in the first class to walk across that stage is more powerful than anyone can imagine,” said Loya. --- Loya takes her step across the stage, shakes a hand or two and receives a paper that tells her she’s an Army leader, but with her first step out the door of her Garden Grove home, five years and 8,000 miles ago, she always was. “In the next six months, we will provide commanders with 900 fit, competent, confident and resilient NCOs,” said Hileman.
  8. 8. Pride 8
  9. 9. Expert Infantryman Badge Story and phots by Sgt. Marcus Fichtl 2nd Armored Brigade Public Affairs Office
  10. 10. S eventeen infantrymen earned the Expert Infantryman Badge during a badging ceremony at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May 31. The event hosted by the 2nd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, tested infantrymen from May 26-30 on the ability to conduct infantry tasks. “The EIB is a special skills badge, first awarded in 1943 and is awarded for the successful completion of a course of testing that is designed to identify infantrymen who are experts in their field,” said Sgt. 1st Class Terris Kolmorgan, event coordinator, 2nd ABCT. He continued to say the Soldiers began the badging process by demonstrating expert proficiency on their assigned weapons systems, high standards on the Army Physical Fitness Test, proficiency in land navigation day and night and working through three days of lanes testing. The lanes included proficiency testing on all infantry weapons, rifles, machine guns and hand grenades. It also tested communication skills, rendering first aid, calling for fire support and making tactical decisions under significant duress. They completed the badging process with a 12-mile ruck march with a 35-pound load while wearing full combat kit. The event started with more than 267 Soldiers, and by the first lane there were less than 150. By the end of the 12-mile road march, there were only 17 left. An attrition rate of 94 percent - high but expected. “This is the 70th year since we have had the EIB in the Army,” said Col. Omar Jones, commander, 2nd ABCT. “During the first EIB, they took 100 Soldiers and only 10 made it through, so that percentage of single digits has been consistent for the last 70 years.” Jones said the badge is a mark of excellence and the Soldiers need to understand what it means to the infantry. “As you wear that badge, wear it with pride,” said Jones. “Inspire others to earn the badge in the future because our goal is to never lower the standards, but for every infantryman to compete and earn the badge in future.” For some who passed, this was their first attempt for the EIB, but for many, this was their second or third attempt, and Jones told the crowd watching the badging ceremony to never falter. “What I ask you to do is reflect on what was pretty darn good training,” said Jones. “Reflect on how frustrating it was to walk off the lane and use that to motivate yourself for the next EIB. Take the training you received, motivate yourself and teach your Soldiers.” Unlike the combat infantryman’s badge, which is earned performing infantry tactics during combat operations, the EIB has its charging handle cocked, symbolizing preparedness and according to Jones, it symbolizes the future of the Army. “The EIB is about readiness, it’s about doing our job, doing our job when asked and doing our job in combat, and to do it better than anyone has done it before,” said Jones. “Make sure the readiness you demonstrated today continues and sustain it for the rest of your career.” Pride 10 Soldiers plot their route for day land navigation as part the Expert Infantryman Badge hosted by the 2nd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May 26, 2014. Later in the evening the Soldiers completed night land navigation.
  11. 11. A Soldier finishes the end of a 12-mile ruck march marking the end of the Expert Infantryman Badge process hosted by the 2nd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May 30, 2014. Seventeen Soldiers finished the ruck march and earned the EIB. A Soldier hugs his squad mate at the end of a 12-mile ruck march marking the end of the Expert Infantryman Badge process hosted by the 2nd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May 30, 2014.
  12. 12. During “downtime” on deployment, most Soldiers watch movies or play video games, but one 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team Soldier spends his time volunteering at the United Service Organizations. Sgt. Lindon McCurdy, supply specialist, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 204th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, has volunteered more than 1,500 hours at the USO over the seven months the brigade has been deployment to Camp Buehring, Kuwait. McCurdy, a native of Orlando, Florida, and a nightly USO volunteer, began with signing out phones, computers and video games, and also setting up tournaments, but he soon started to display additional talents to the other USO staff. “When I first started out, before they knew what I was capable of, I started out on the desk helping Soldiers,” said McCurdy. “Making sure they were comfortable coming into the center and they knew what was going on.” When the brigade first arrived, McCurdy noticed the potential the USO could have. “The USO was not well known amongst the brigade, and not a lot of people showed up,” said McCurdy. “I made it my mission to kind of advocate on behalf of the USO because there was free stuff being given away, free events, things to be won and people A Regular Superman weren’t showing up.” Volunteering comes natural to McCurdy. “I think it is just in my nature,” said McCurdy. “Ever since I was small, I have had a super hero complex. Everyone who knows me knows I’m a huge fan of Superman. Not Superman the comic, but Superman and what he stands for.” For the staff of the USO, McCurdy is always there to save the day. “With him as a volunteer, he is incredible,” said Christina Ambrose, USO volunteer coordinator. “He has done so many creative projects and taken them under his wing, and it has bettered the center in so many ways.” Stoay and Photos by Staff Sgt. Andrew Porch, 2nd Brigade Public Affairs Office Pride 12 Sgt. Lindon McCurdy, supply specialist, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 204th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, helps paint a mural located outside the United Service Organization on Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May 20, 2014.
  13. 13. As McCurdy began to feel comfortable at the USO, his talents in design started to shine and flourish. “I’m a firm believer in giving back,” said McCurdy. “Being that this was the only place I had, I came here and kind of turned the center into my own.” S i n c e volunteering at the USO, McCurdy has painted murals, contributed to the decor of the inside of the building and designed graphic flyers, coins and shirts. “We are so lucky to have him here,” said Ambrose. “He is fantastic. He has got so much talent that we haven’t seen in a long time from a volunteer.” As a volunteer, you are on display for all the other Soldiers to see. “If you talk to one of the staff member here, I’m sure they might mention something about setting a standard,” said McCurdy. “It isn’t about the time, it is about the quality of service and I have tried to give 110 percent to this place.” And what type of example does M c C u r d y show for others to strive for? “He sets an amazing e x a m p l e for other v o l u n t e e r s with attitude, skill and just who he is,” said Ambrose. “He has brought in other volunteers and recruited amazing people with similar skills and talents. We are very lucky to have him.” Though it is important for McCurdy to volunteer, he knows the mission comes first. “It’s always duty first in the Army,” said McCurdy. “Granted, I am doing a great thing, but (my job) is what I signed up to do. That is what they pay me to do, so duty always comes first. If I am accomplishing everything that I need to, then I can go ahead and do my extracurricular stuff.” Withthedeploymentcomingtoend, McCurdy hopes to close in on 1,700 hours and continue his volunteering back at Fort Carson. “He has definitely left his mark in so many ways,” said Ambrose. “They are going to be the luckiest USO ever. I can’t even put into words the impact he has had here. He has done so, so much. For the center back in the states, they hit the goldmine.” “I’m a huge fan of Superman. Not Superman the comic, but Superman and what he stands for.” Sgt. Lindon McCurdy, supply specialist, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 204th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, sits in front of a mural he painted located outside the United Service Organization, Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May 22, 2014.
  14. 14. Hea It's the summ Sgt. Gordon Zi care specialist 10th Mountain on his way hom of rest and recu when Spc. Nic Bernier, a juni Zietlow's repl eager to get "on t his job, but by th returned, Bern shot while man machine gun outpost from a T Pride 14
  15. 15. aling. mer of 2011 and ietlow, a health then with the n Division, was me for two weeks uperation leave cholas "Bernie" ior medic and lacement, was the line" and do he time Zietlow nier was dead, nning a M240B defending his Taliban attack. A Soldier stands sentinel across from a field of 6800 memorial lights representing the U.S. servicemembers who have fallen in Iraq and Afghanistan, during a Memorial Day vigil at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May 26, 2014.
  16. 16. “It could have been me,” said Zietlow, who is now assigned to the 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. “There are a lot of guys who have that story.” After twelve years of conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan, 6,800 service members have given their lives. There are a lot of stories, a lot of missing faces. It’s why for three years now that Camp Buehring, Kuwait, and the United Service Organizations light the field with lights, cover the walls with faces and help remember fallen service members with a 5k Memorial Day Run and Vigil. The run is a zigzagging course through Camp Buehring complete with helicopter fly overs and an escorting convoy of humvees, and finally ends in an open desert field illuminated by 6,800 LED light filled paper bags. "We wanted to create a 5k that was a little different, somber but reflective, commemorative, and hopefully a moment of healing," Said Tiffany Banks, USO Director, Camp Buehring. And for Zietlow, a Marion, Wisconsin, native, who heals a little each day playing and teaching guitar at the USO, was asked by the USO staff to perform Amazing Grace, the centerpiece of the events vigil. "I grew up singing in the Catholic church as a canter, with grandpa, grandma, dad, my brothers, and my aunts singing along side me," said Zietlow. "So the song has always been with me, but I never really took the time to really study and understand the lyrics. I just sang the piece and followed the hymnal, but out here having the opportunity to learn the song was really special." Zietlow came to a crossroads on how the sing the song, with or without using the guitar he was known for in the USO, until he had a conversation with his wife and she said, "Sing it like it was sung 200 years ago." And Zietlow knew what he had to do. “Itcouldhavebeenme... there’s a lot of guys who have that story.” Pride 16
  17. 17. "I didn't want to make it my own," he said. "It was about them and their sacrifice and it was about how the lyrics they wrote transcend time, how the lyrics still stand today," As Zietlow prepared his song, volunteers prepared the luminaries and vigil. To build the luminaries on Camp Buehring took time and dedication as 6,800 bags needed to be filled with sand, 6,800 bags needed have an LED light and 6800 bags needed to be placed. In spite of the heat and the sandstorms, during the laying of the luminaries, Banks witnessed a cleansing process for her military volunteers. "The entire process of the planning, the preparing and the setting of the bags and then lighting them that evening and seeing the final product is an opportunity to heal," said Banks. "You see them go through the all elements of the process of healing throughout the project." For Banks and the USO, they simply want to show the service members that people care about them. A Soldier watches faces of the fallen projected onto a wall during a Memorial Day vigil at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May 26, 2014. 6,800 memorial lights filled a desert field representing the U.S. service members who have fallen in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  18. 18. Pride 18 Soldiers walk across a field of 6800 memorial lights representing th "There are people who care about the service provided from Soldiers, wounded Soldiers, their families, and those who passed," said Banks. "Your name won't be forgotten." The runners reached the end point, flanked by tanks and humvees to the side, and helicopters above. Zietlow took the stage with 6,800 fallen souls behind him and hundreds of Soldiers before him; he clutched the microphone, fighting tears as he sings the first line, the wall next to him flashing the faces of the fallen. "Amazing grace, how sweet the sound." For a few minutes it was nothing but Zietlow channeling his thoughts, his pain. It was his healing. "It's helped me become inspired and motivated to live and earn this freedom we have," said Zietlow. "A freedom definitely earned by the sacrifices of so many brave men and women." “Your n “A freedom definitely earned by the sacrifices of so
  19. 19. he U.S. Soldiers who have fallen in Iraq and Afghanistan, during a Memorial Day vigil at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May 26, 2014. name won’t be forgotten.” o many brave men and women.”
  20. 20. WarhorseStory and Photos by Staff Sgt. Andrew Por Pride 20
  21. 21. Inducteesrch 2nd Armored Brigade Public Affairs Office The Sergeant Audie Murphy Medallion rests upon a member’s chest during an induction ceremony on Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, May 24, 2014. The medallion is 2.75 inches in diameter and is suspended from an 18-inch powder-blue ribbon. Soldiers appearing before the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club board are required to describe the medallion and specific key moments in Murphy’s history.
  22. 22. “Thisclubisateam of elite professionals who stand out in their units,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Ronnie Kelley, senior enlisted leader, U.S. Army Central. “These (noncommissioned officers) understand selfless service and commitment. These are NCOs that understand character and being an example means everything.TheAudieMurphy members are leaders and mentors in the community. These are NCOs that want to make a difference.” Kelley, the senior U.S. Army Central Sergeant Audie Murphy Club member, was the guest speaker at the ceremony that inducted two Soldiers assigned to 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division on Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, May 24. Staff Sgt. David Jones, infantryman, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Reg., and Sgt. Tyree Kitchen, generator mechanic, Company B, 204th Brigade Support Battalion, stood out among 16 participants to be the only Soldiers inducted for the quarter. “I am very proud of myself and I’m very humbled that I was allowed to even be a part of this,” said Kitchen. “To be recognized by my brigade commander, my brigade sergeant major, my battalion leadership, my first sergeant - I couldn’t have done this without them recommending me or seeing the potential inside of me.” Jones reiterated the joy of gaining acceptance into the club. “It is an amazing accomplishment for me,” said Jones. “I went to the board about two months ago and to finally be recognized as part of the top two percent is an amazing feeling.” The inductee’s journey started last winter with weekly study groups and practice boards that encouraged them to answer questions requiring a combination of book Pride 22 Staff Sgt. David Jones, left, infantryman, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, Brigade Combat, 4th Infantry Division, stand at attention during their induction ceremony into the Sergeant Audie Murphy started preparing for the board last December through study sessions and situation based questioning.
  23. 23. knowledge and personal experience. “Countless hours of studying and it isn’t just sitting down in front of a book and reading the questions and answers,” said Sgt. 1st Class Alfred Leblanc, military policeman, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Special Troops Battalion, 2nd ABCT. “To study for this board, it’s proposing a situation and talking through how you would react as a leader,” Leblanc, a SAMC member, went on to say is expected of NCOs that join the elite group. “Setting the standard is the job for every NCO,” said Leblanc. “But with the Audie Murphy members, they set the example for all other NCOs. They have committed to doing everything that they can to being perfect.” For Kitchen, this is for his Soldiers just as much as it is for him. “It allowed me to put myself to the test and know what my abilities are under pressure and put myself up against my peers,” said Kitchen. “It also shows Soldiers in my section and any Soldierwatching,thatifyouapply yourself you can do whatever you need to.” And how does he think it makes him a better leader? “I wouldn’t say that this right here makes me a better leader,” said Kitchen. “I believe that the Audi Murphy Club is just a formal recognition for NCOs for things that they are supposed to do on a daily basis.” Now that Jones is a member, he plans to take the club to new heights. , and Sgt. Tyree Kitchen, generator mechanic, Company B, 204th Brigade Support Battalion, both of the 2nd Armored y Club on Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, May 24, 2014. Jones and Kitchen, the only two Soldiers inducted during the ceremony, “I’m going to be an actual member,” said Jones. “I’m not just going to be a medallion wearer. I’m going to pursue it and live up to the creed of it. I’m going to spotlight this organization. We are all about helping the community and giving back to our Soldiers, and that is what the Army is about.”
  24. 24. One last shot Pride 24 U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Andrew Porch, 2nd Armored Brigade Public Affairs Office
  25. 25. Sgt. Justin Banner, right, signal support system specialist, Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2nd Special Troops Battalion, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, lands a right cross on Spc. Aaron Cameron, health supply specialist, Company C, 204th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd ABCT during level-one combatives training on Camp Buehring, Kuwait, May 30, 2014. On the last day of training, Soldiers must be able to complete three cliches while level-two certified instructors throw punches at them.
  26. 26. Pride 26
  27. 27. Warhorse Friends and Families, I recently learned of my next assignment to US Central Command in Tampa, Florida. My report date requires my family and me to leave the brigade and Fort Carson earlier than expected. I will change command here in Kuwait on 9 June. While we are excited about this opportunity and this next chapter in our military adventure, we leave this brigade with very heavy hearts. I am incredibly proud of the brigade and everything these amazing Soldiers have accomplished the past two years. It truly has been my honor to serve on their team. I am very excited to see the impact these great Soldiers make as they join units across the Army as we inactivate. Our Army will be a stronger, more powerful team for their continued service and contributions. Thank you to our southern Colorado community for your generous support to our Soldiers and their Families. This is a remarkable community and is incredibly gracious and supportive of our military service members and Families. Thank you! I want to thank all of our Warhorse Families. Thank you for your selfless support to your Soldiers and our brigade. While we have accomplished much the last two years, none of it would have been possible without your support. Thank you for everything you do and everything you sacrifice as a military Family member. You really are our strength. I will relinquish command to LTC Andy Koloski. I have known Andy since 1988, and he has been with our brigade since last spring. He knows our Soldiers, our Families, this mission, and our team. He and his wife, Kym, are absolutely the right team to finish this deployment and lead our brigade through inactivation next January. I look forward to serving with many of you in the future. Lead the Charge! …. Warhorse! Omar The Warhorse Pride is produced in the interest of the Soldiers of the 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. The Warhorse Pide is an Army- funded news-letter authorized under provision of AR 360-1. Contents of the Warhorse Pride are not necessarily the view of, nor endorsed by the U.S. government, Department of Defense, Department of the Army or the 4th Infantry Division. All editorial content of The Warhorse Pride is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs Office. The Warhorse Pride welcomes articles, commentary and photos from readers. The Warhorse Pride reserves the right to edit submissions selected for the publication. All issues of The Warhorse Pride can be viewed online from your home computer at www.facebook. com/2bct4id Submissions should be e-mailed to the editor: andrew.a.porch.mil@mail.mil Col. Omar Jones IV......................2nd ABCT Commander Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Lehtonen 2nd ABCT CSM Maj. Chris Maestas.................................................PAO OIC Staff Sgt. Andrew Porch..................................PAO NCOIC Sgt. Marcus Fichtl...............................Layout and Design Staff Sgt. Andrew Porch............................................Editor Warhorse Pride Pride 28

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