• Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
620
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Since the introduction of computers into the classroom, billions of dollars have been spent on computers and the infrastructure necessary to support them. However, as schools continue to invest in constantly changing technology one question is still asked today by many administrators: “Is there evidence that using technology leads to higher levels of student learning?”   The answer to this question requires us to look closely at the information I will be presenting.  
  • The points I will be covering are:   1. Technology as a Tool 2. More Than Just Improved Test Scores 3. Successfully Implementing Technology 4. Global Competitiveness for the 21 st Century 5. Technology’s Impact on Education   A. Before we begin, it’s critical to keep one idea in mind as we move forward with technology in education. Technology needs to be seen as a tool, not an end in itself.   B. Teachers, not technology are the key to motivating students and unlocking their potential.
  • Holy Smoke?   Research has been conducted for more than 20 years in an effort to determine the impact technology has on education. Some studies worth mentioning include:   eMINTS (Missouri 2002) What is eMINTS? eMINTS = enhancing Missouri’s Instructional Networked Teaching Strategies by providing professional development services to educators PreK-20 nationwide. eMINTS focuses on innovative practices through multimedia and computer technology. The results have revealed statistically significant differences in the performance of eMINTS students to non-eMINTS students across an array of subject areas. Specifically, students in the eMINTS classrooms consistently outperformed their peers in statewide math assessments. (ISTE Policy Brief, 2008)
  • Texas-TIP program Technology Immersion Pilot (TIP) for middle schools, students in one fully engaged TIP middle schools saw their math achievement scores increase by 5 percent among 6th graders, 42 percent among 7 th grades, and 24 percent among 8 th graders.   The TIP program not only boasted improved test scores, but technology implementation in the classroom led to a reduction in discipline problems and increases in student technology proficiency and use.   Other studies report that students are more motivated to learn, have increased self-confidence and self-esteem and felt more successful when using computer-based instruction.
  • Strathem and Torell (1996) reviewed 10 meta-analyses on the effectiveness of technology and their findings indicated: i.When properly implemented, computer technology had a significant effect on student achievement as measured by test scores
  • ii. When used appropriately, computer technology stimulated increased teacher-student interaction iii. Students from computer-rich classrooms demonstrated better behavior and had lower absentee and drop-out rates iv. Computer-based teaching was especially effective among populations of at-risk students. Eleven studies published since 2000 looked at the effect of technology in raising achievement in specific subject areas and seven showed strong positive effects on scores among elementary and secondary students. (Banerjee 2005, Penuel et. al. 2002 and five intervention reports from What Works Clearinghouse July 2007, May 2007, March 2007, October 2006 and September 2006)
  • Holy Grail?   Successfully Implementing Technology   Correct implementation of technology into teaching and learning is necessary in order for it to be successful. Merely purchasing equipment and software is not enough. These seven items should be considered: (ISTE Policy Brief) 1. Effective professional development 2. Application of technology must align with curriculum standards 3. Technology must be incorporated into daily learning, not just as a supplement.
  • 4. Must provide individualized feedback to students. 5. Technology use must be incorporated in a collaborative environment. 6. Project-based learning and real-world simulations must be the main focus of technology utilizations. 7. Effective technology integration requires leadership, support, and modeling from teachers, administrators and the community/parents.
  • As important as the information is on positive effects on students and overall test scores, this research does little to promote the teaching of the 21 st century skills required to be successful in a competitive workforce. By using technology in education, students are exposed to a wide array of technology-based skills. Some of those skills include the ability to collaborate, communicate, create, innovate and problem solve. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development reports that skills mastery in science, technology, and innovation are the keys to stronger economic growth. However, only a small percentage of American students receive rigorous training in and exposure to such skills (Business Roundtable, 2005). The use of technology in education will better prepare students for this global marketplace and workforce.
  • Technology’s Impact on Education   Introducing technology into the learning environment has been shown to make learning more student-centered, to encourage cooperative learning and to stimulate increased teacher/student interaction. Students are taking more responsibility for their education and are more engaged in the learning process.
  • The information presented here should help you answer the question asked at the beginning of this argument, “Is there evidence that using technology leads to higher levels of student learning?” Yes, there is evidence and plenty of it. However, the responsibility of having successful implementation of technology in education lies in the hands of the teachers who will be educating the students as well as the administration to provide the necessary means, including professional development to ensure its success.

Transcript

  • 1. Holy Smoke or Holy Grail?
    • Intro Slide
    • Holy Smoke? E-MINTS Study
    • TIP Study
    • Stratham & Torrell Study
    • Holy Grail-7 Steps to Success
    • Global Competitiveness
    • Impact on Education
    • Conclusion
  • 2. Technology and Student Achievement: Holy Smoke or Holy Grail? ED 633-Carrie M. Ward
  • 3. Technology as a Tool
    • First and foremost, technology should be seen as a tool, not an end in itself.
    • Teachers, not technology are key to motivating students and unlocking their potential.
  • 4. Holy Smoke?
    • Studies worth mentioning:
    • eMINTS (Missouri 2002)
      • Results have revealed statistically significant differences in the performance of eMINTS students to non-eMINTS students across an array of subject areas.
      • Specifically, students in the eMINTS classrooms consistently outperformed their peers in statewide math assessments. (ISTE Policy Brief, 2008)
  • 5. Holy Smoke?
    • Texas-TIP program (Technology Immersion Pilot)
    • Middle school students in one fully engaged TIP middle schools saw their math achievement scores increase by 5 percent among 6th graders , 42 percent among 7 th grades, and 24 percent among 8 th graders.
    • Also recognized a reduction in discipline problems and increases in student technology proficiency and use.
  • 6. Holy Smoke?
    • Strathem and Torell (1996) reviewed 10 meta-analyses on the effectiveness of technology and their findings indicated:
      • When properly implemented, computer technology had a significant effect on student achievement as measured by test scores.
  • 7. Holy Smoke?
    • Strathem and Torell findings (continued):
    • Computer technology stimulated increased teacher-student interaction
    • Computer-rich classrooms students demonstrated better behavior and had lower absentee and drop-out rates
    • Computer-based teaching was especially effective among populations of at-risk students.
  • 8. Holy Grail?
    • The following seven items should be considered: (ISTE Policy Brief)
      • Effective professional development
      • Technology must align with curriculum standards
      • Technology must be incorporated into daily learning.
  • 9. Holy Grail?
      • The following seven items should be considered: (ISTE Policy Brief) (continued)
      • Individualized feedback to students.
      • Incorporate technology in a collaborative environment.
      • 6. Project-based learning must be the main focus of technology utilizations.
      • 7. Effective technology requires integration.
  • 10. Holy Grail?
    • Global Competiveness for 21 st Century
  • 11. Holy Grail?
    • Technology’s Impact on Education
  • 12. Holy Smoke or Holy Grail?