Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Socioeconomy Analysis and Livelihoods of the Fishery Villages in Ayeyarwady Delta, Myanmar
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Socioeconomy Analysis and Livelihoods of the Fishery Villages in Ayeyarwady Delta, Myanmar

107
views

Published on

Presentation for Mini-Research conducted on Socioeconomic Analysis and Livelihoods of the Fishery villages in Ayeyarwady Delta, Myanmar

Presentation for Mini-Research conducted on Socioeconomic Analysis and Livelihoods of the Fishery villages in Ayeyarwady Delta, Myanmar

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
107
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Report on Socio-economy Analysis and Livelihoods of the Fishery Villages in Laputta and Bogalay Townships
  • 2. Study Coverage Bogalay Laputta • Two villages in Fresh Water Region • Two villages in Brackish Water Region • Two villages in Saline Water Region Two major Townships
  • 3. Illitrate Read/… Monast… Primary Middle High… Graduate 1% 3% 15% 53% 20% 8% 0 3% 5% 16% 49% 20% 5% 1% Bogalay Laputta <50000 50001-100000 100001-150000 150001-200000 200001-250000 >250000 4% 23% 31% 27% 7% 9% 5% 28% 36% 20% 5% 5% Bogalay Laputta Socioeconomic Profile of the Fishery Villages Agriculture Fishery Livestock MSE Casual 9% 81% 3% 1% 6% 11% 79% 2% 1% 7% Occupation (Livelihood) Bogalay Laputta 2% 18% 76% 4% Wealth Rich Better off Poor V. Poor 75% of respondents finished only Primary 31% of respondents Are in chronic poverty 80% of respondents Are considered POOR Non-resilience to Shocks 80% of respondents Are landless fishermen Income Education
  • 4. Livelihoods • Fishery and Paddy Farming are the main livelihoods in the targeted villages of the two townships. • 80% of respondents are engaging in fishery as their main livelihood 80% 2% 1% 10% 7% 7%
  • 5. Gender • Statistically female constitutes 51% of the population • Traditionally men are responsible to make family livings and hence women mostly stay home and help the husband’s livelihood, and few are engaging in home based micro business (1%) • 2% of respondent HH reported that decision making power is on men, 4% reported that it is on woman, 94% of HH reported that it was equally decided hence also reported husband provided 100% of his earning to the wife to manage the family expenses Total Laputta Bogalay 49% 47% 52%51% 53% 48% Male & Female Ratio Male Female 4% 94% 2% Decision Making Female Equal Male
  • 6. Poverty 80% of households (997) out of the total of 1255 households in six villages are considered poor (or) very poor households and indeed they are landless fishermen 2% 18% 76% 4% Wealth Ranking Rich Better off Poor V. Poor
  • 7. Access to Land 89% of Fishery HHs in Bogalay and 91% in Laputta DOES NOT have access to agricultural land, however small percentages of fishery HHs ranging from 9% to 11% have access to some Agricultural land and are considered ‘better off’ Laputta Bogalay Fresh Saline Brakish Fresh Saline Brakish Township Laputta Bogale 9% 11% 4% 8% 16% 12% 8% 12% 91% 89% 96% 92% 84% 88% 92% 88% Yes No
  • 8. Investment for Fishing Gear Low Fish Catch Boats are small Fishing plots are small Fishing nets damage Lack of manpower No problem 49% 27% 8% 8% 3% 1% 6% Challenges in Fishery Livelihood • Investment for Fishing Gear (i.e. Access to Finance) is the number one challenge for the fishermen, 100% of respondents claimed that they have no access (i.e. not qualify) to institutional microfinance • Low fish catch in the river is the second highest concern
  • 9. Fishing Rights 85% to 100% of respondent fishermen are engaging in river (inland) fishery Inland Fishing rights’ is also one of the major concerns and a burden for the poor fishery households in the Delta, especially the “competitive Tender system” of Bogalay was mentioned as a biggest constraint for the Bogalay fishermen, on the other hand “per net per year License system” in Laputta, was mentioned as favorable system for the poor fishermen, hence evidently Bogalay fishermen are poorer than Laputta fishermen. Coastal River Creek 2% 85% 14% 0 100% 0 Laputta Bogalay Rich Betteroff Poor V. poor 41% 16% 75% 8%8% 42% 48% 2% Bogalay Laputta
  • 10. Fishing net Motorboat Boat 86% 31% 18% 92% 34% 28% Laputta Bogalay Fishing Gear 86 % of fishermen in Laputta and 92% in Bogalay owned some fishing nets. Over 30% owned motor boats and 18% in Laputta and 28% in Bogalay owned non-motor boats, however the rest about 45% of fishermen does not owned boat, and 8% to 14% of fishermen does not owned fishing net or boat. (The cost of the motorized boat and nets is estimated at 2000 US$)
  • 11. 1-10 Viss 11-20 Viss 21-30 Viss 31-40 Viss 41-50 Viss >50 Viss 22% 22% 16% 16% 13% 11% 42% 9% 33% 5% 5% 7% Laputta Bogalay Low Fish Catch • 89% of fishermen in Laputta and 93% in Bogalay are able to catch less than 50 viss of fish per month, less than 2 viss per day (below the FAO estimates 2012) • Average income of the majority of fishermen is estimated at 1$ per day (below national poverty line “3$ per day” – IHLCA – UNDP 2011)
  • 12. All More than half Half Less than half 19% 7% 55% 19% 8% 18% 53% 21% Laputta Bogalay COPING MECHANISM Eating Captured Fish About 79% of fishery family in Bogalay and 81% in Laputta are eating at least half of their captured fish Eating Captured Fish
  • 13. Rare Sometimes Often 4% 4% 0 12% 12% 3% Laputta Bogalay COPING MECHANISM Skipping Meal • 27% of fishery family in Bogalay and 8% in Laputta are skipping the meal (rare, sometime and often (3% Bogalay)) Skipping Meal
  • 14. COPING MECHANISM Debt Cycle 41% of fishery family in Laputta and 49% in Bogalay reported that they are in viscous debt cycle for whole year, Majority of respondents claimed that they do not have access to institutional microfinance because they are not qualified for the strict qualifications set by the MFIs 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 10% 0 15% 14% 2% 10% 0 3% 3% 2% 0 41% 2% 8% 12% 5% 5% 5% 2% 2% 0 6% 6% 49% No. of months in debt per year Laputta Bogalay
  • 15. Conclusion • Approximately 60% of population in Delta are engaging in small scale inland fishery sector, (60% of 7 million/5 = 840,000 HHs) and 80% of them (672,000 HHs) are considered poor. • Poor fishery households of the Ayeyarwady Delta are struggling to meet their daily food and essential household needs, therefore are socio- economically disadvantaged. Challenges Social Concern • Access to finance is the number one challenge for the poor fishery households, hence 41% to 49& of the households are living under the poverty line, thus altogether 80% of the rural households claimed as ‘poor’ and does not qualify for any Microfinance projects although numbers of MFIs are operating in the Area Environmental and Economy Concern • Low Fish catch is the second highest concern of the fishery households, and average fish catch is reported at less than 2 viss per day which is lower than the average estimated by the FAO in 2012.
  • 16. Recommendations • A strategy for sustainable livelihoods development and poverty reduction for the poor fishery households in the Delta is by default strongly correlated with a focus on development assistances for small scale fisheries, livestock, and to a lesser extent micro enterprise sectors • Access to Finance (Save the Fishermen) (1) It is recommended to establish community based Fishermen Cooperatives (or) ROSCA (Rotating Saving & Credit Association) (consists of at least 10 poor fishery HHs per group) (2) One time cash grant of 2500$ per group should be injected to the each group as a first rotating grant, hence effective and sustainable saving and rotating mechanism should also be establish benefit the everyone in the group The objective of the fund is to finance the poor fishermen in (a) purchasing of fishing boat and gears with their own money (2000$) (b) establishing of livestock (or) MSE at home as a secondary income generation (500$) • Sustainable fishing practice and enforcement • - It is also recommend that sustainable fishing practices should be made legal and enforced strictly