Chap 30: E-business Infrastructure
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Chap 30: E-business Infrastructure

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"E-BUSINESS and E-COMMERCE MANAGEMENT" Dave Chaffey, E-Business and E-Commerce Management, 3rd Edition © Marketing Insights Ltd 2007

"E-BUSINESS and E-COMMERCE MANAGEMENT" Dave Chaffey, E-Business and E-Commerce Management, 3rd Edition © Marketing Insights Ltd 2007

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  • 1. CHAPTER 3 E-BUSINESS INFRASTRUCTURE
  • 2. Learning outcomes
    • Outline the hardware and software technologies used to build an e-business infrastructure within an organisation and with its partners
    • Outline the hardware and software requirements necessary to enable employee access to the Internet and hosting of e-commerce services.
  • 3. E-business infrastructure
    • The architecture of hardware, software. Content and data used to deliver e-business services to employees, customers and partners
  • 4. Typical problems
    • Web site communications too slow.
    • Web site not available.
    • Bugs on site through pages being unavailable or information typed in forms not being executed.
    • Ordered products not delivered on time.
    • E-mails not replied to.
    • Customers’ privacy or trust is broken through security problems such as credit cards being stolen or addresses sold to other companies.
  • 5. Figure 3.1 A five-layer model of e-business infrastructure
  • 6. Table 3.1 Key management issues of e-business infrastructure
  • 7. Table 3.1 Key management issues of e-business infrastructure (Continued)
  • 8. What is the Internet?
    • “ The Internet, sometimes called simply "the Net," is a worldwide system of computer networks - a network of networks in which users at any one computer can, if they have permission, get information from any other computer”
    • -whatis.com
    • “ A global network connecting millions of computers. More than 100 countries are linked into exchanges of data, news and opinions.
    • -webopedia.com
    • “ is logically linked together by a globally unique address space based on the Internet Protocol (IP) or its subsequent extensions/follow-ons”
    • -FNC
  • 9. Figure 3.2 Physical and network infrastructure components of the Internet (Levels IV and III in Figure 3.1 )
  • 10. London Internet Exchange
    • Located in Docklands area in East London
    • Second large IX in Europe
  • 11. Malaysia and Internet
    • Internet Usage Statistics: 13,528,200 Internet users as of Sept/2006, 47.8% of the population, according to M.C.M.C.
    • Malaysia Internet Exchange (MyIX)
      • Established in November, 2003
      • Launched on 15 th December 2006
      • 3 nodes connected in AIMS, NCC and TPM Jaring
  • 12. Table 3.2 Six stages of advances in the dissemination of information
  • 13. Clay tablets Guternberg Press
  • 14. Figure 3.3 A five-layer model of e-business infrastructure
  • 15. How big is the Internet?
    • Over 1 billion Internet users worldwide
    • How big the infrastructure they accessing?
      • Measured by number of servers
      • Number of pages indexed by search engines
      • 2006: 9 billion pages
      • Dec 2007:????
  • 16. Figure 3.4 The Netcraft index of number of servers Source : Netcraft Web Server Survey. http://news.netcraft.com/archives/web server survey.html . Netcraft, http://netcraft.com
  • 17. Intranet and extranet
    • Intranet:
      • A private network within a single company using Internet standards to enable employees to share information
    • Extranet:
      • Formed by extending an intranet beyond a company to customers, suppliers and collaborators
  • 18. Figure 3.5 The relationship between intranets, extranets and the Internet
  • 19. Intranet applications
    • Used extensively for supporting sell-side e-commerce
    • Also used for internal marketing communications
  • 20. Extranet applications
    • Used to provide online services which are restricted to business customers
  • 21. Business benefits of extranet
    • Information sharing
    • Cost reduction
    • Order processing and distribution
    • Customer service
  • 22. Premier Dell.com
  • 23. Questions on extranet?
    • Are the levels of usage sufficient?
    • Is it effective and efficient?
    • Who has ownership of the extranet?
    • What are the levels of service quality?
    • Is the quality of information adequate?
  • 24. Use of extranet on global basis
  • 25. Firewalls
    • A specialized software mounted on a separate server at the point where the company is connected to the Internet
    • Use to protect information on the company
  • 26. Figure 3.6 Firewall positions within the e-business infrastructure of the B2B company
  • 27. Figure 3.7 Information exchange between a web browser and web server
  • 28. What is the Internet?
    • World Wide Web – standard method for exchanging information on the Internet
    • Web browsers – a method of accessing and viewing information stored as web documents
    • Web servers – store and present the web pages
  • 29. World Wide Web
    • Based on standard document formats such as HTML
      • Offers hyperlink
      • Supports a wide range of formatting
      • Can integrate graphics and animations
      • Make interactions possible
  • 30. Web 2.0
    • It isn’t a new web standard
    • Just an evolution of technologies and communication approaches
    • Some main characteristics:
      • Web services or interactive applications hosted on the Web
      • Ad funding of neutral sites
      • Encouraging creation of user-generated content
      • Enabling rating of content
  • 31. del.icio.us
  • 32. Internet tools
    • E-mail
    • Instant messaging (IM) and Internet Relay Chat (IRC)
    • Usenet newsgroups
    • FTP file transfer
    • Telnet
    • Blogs
    • RSS (Really Simple Syndication)
    • World Wide Web
    • IPTV
    • BitTorrent
  • 33. Blogs
  • 34. RSS
    • An Internet standard for publishing and exchanging content using XML
    • Content can be published on a site that originates from another site
    • New method of distributing messages to subscribers
  • 35. RSS
  • 36. RSS feeds
  • 37. VOIP
    • Voice data is transferred across the Internet – it enables phone calls to be made over the Internet
      • Peer-to-peer
      • Hosted service
      • Complete replacement of all telephone systems
      • Upgrading telephone systems
  • 38. Figure 3.8 The TCP/IP protocol
  • 39. URLS and domain names
    • Web addresses are structured in a standard way as follows:
    • http://www.domain-name.extension/filename.html
    • What do the following extensions or global top level domains stand for?
      • .com
      • .co.uk , .uk.com
      • .org or .org.uk
      • .gov
      • .edu, .ac.uk
      • .int
      • .net
      • .biz
      • .info
  • 40. HTML and XML
    • HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) A standard format used to define the text and layout of web pages. HTML files usually have the extension .HTML or .HTM.
    • XML or eXtensible Markup Language
    • A standard for transferring structured data, unlike HTML which is purely presentational.
  • 41. Figure 3.9 Home page index.html for The B2B Company in a web browser showing HTML source in text editor
  • 42. Figure 3.10 (a) Fragmented applications infrastructure, (b) integrated applications infrastructure Source : Adapted from Hasselbring (2000)
  • 43. XML example
    • Product>
    • <Action Value5”Delete”/>
    • <ProductID>118003-008</ProductID>
    • </Product>
    • <Product Type5”Good” SchemaCategoryRef5”C43171801”>
    • <ProductID>140141-002</ProductID>
    • <UOM><UOMCoded>EA</UOMCoded></UOM>
    • <Manufacturer>Compaq</Manufacturer>
    • <LeadTime>2</LeadTime>
    • <CountryOfOrigin>
    • <Country><CountryCoded>US</CountryCoded></Country>
    • </CountryOfOrigin>
  • 44. Media standards
    • GIF (Graphics Interchange Format) A graphics format and compression algorithm best used for simple graphics
    • JPEG (Joint Photographics Experts Group) A graphics format and compression algorithm best used for photographs
    • Streaming media . Sound and video that can be experienced within a web browser before the whole clip is downloaded e.g. Real Networks .rm format
    • Video standards include MPEG and .AVI
    • Sound standards include MP3 and WMA
  • 45. Who controls the Internet?
    • ICANN
    • The Internet Society ( www.isoc.org )
    • The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
    • The World Wide Web Consortium ( www.w3.org )
    • Telecommunications Information Networking Architecture Consortium TINA-C
  • 46. Managing e-business infrastructure
    • Layer II – Systems software
      • Standardization throughout organization
    • Layer III – Transport or network
      • Based on internal company network
    • Laver IV – Storage
      • Based on company needs
  • 47. Internet service providers (ISP)
    • ISP connection method
    • Speed of access
    • Availability
    • Service-level agreements
    • Security
  • 48. Figure 3.11 Differing use of applications at levels of management within companies
  • 49. Figure 3.12 Elements of e-business infrastructure that require management
  • 50. New access devices
    • Mobile access devices
    • Wi-Fi mobile access
    • Bluetooth
    • Next-generation mobile services
    • Interactive digital television
  • 51. Bluetooth
  • 52. Figure 3.13 Mobile access technologies
  • 53. Figure 3.14 Components of an interactive digital TV system