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Chap012 cb

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  • 1. CHAPTER TWELVE Self-Concept and Lifestyle McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2004 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 2. What is a Self-concept?
    • Self-concept: the totality of the individual’s thoughts and feelings having reference to him-or herself as an object
    • Self-concept can be divided into four basic parts…
  • 3. Dimensions of a Consumer’s Self-Concept
  • 4. Consumer Insight 12-1
    • How does a tattoo affect one’s self-concept and become part of one’s extended self?
    • Will one or multiple visible tattoos become the norm for younger consumers over the next 10 years?
    • How is the renaissance in tattooing similar to the revival of cigar smoking? How is it different?
  • 5. In-class Exercise
    • Using Table 12-2 (on the next slide):
    • Rate your own actual self concept (A)
    • Rate your desired self concept (D)
    • Rate the product concept of your favorite beverage (B)
    • Rate the person concept of your favorite celebrity of the same gender (C)
    • Assess the consistency of these four concepts
  • 6. Measurement Scale for “Concepts”
  • 7. Interaction of Self-Concept and Brand Image
  • 8. Lifestyle and the Consumption Process
  • 9. Measurement of Lifestyle
    • Lifestyle Studies
      • Attitudes
      • Values
      • Activities and Interests
      • Demographics
      • Media Patterns
      • Usage Rates
    • Can be used as a general measure, but most commonly used to measure a specific product or activity.
    • General lifestyles can be used to discover new product opportunities.
    • Specific lifestyle analysis may help reposition existing brands.
  • 10. Table 12-3
  • 11. The Vals System
    • SRI Consulting Business Intelligence
    • 42 statements of agreement
    • Classifies individuals using two dimensions
      • Self Orientation
        • Principle oriented
        • Status oriented
        • Action oriented
      • Resources
    • Individuals are placed in one of 8 general psychographic segments
  • 12. VALS Lifestyle System
  • 13. Demographics of the VALS Segments Actualizer Fulfilled Believer Achiever Striver Experiencer Maker Struggler Total
  • 14. VALS Segment Ownership and Activities Total Actualizer Fulfilled Believer Achiever Striver Experiencer Maker Struggler
  • 15. Yankelovich’s MONITOR MindBase
    • Considers the individual’s position on a set of core values with his or her life cycle stage
    • Values identified include:
      • Materialism
      • Technology orientation
      • Family values
      • Conservatism
      • Cynicism versus optimism
      • Social Interaction
      • Activity level
    • Grouped into 8 high-level segments
  • 16. Consumption Differences across MindBase Segments
  • 17. Geo-Demographic Analysis (PRIZM)
    • Based on the premise that lifestyle, and thus consumption, is largely driven by demographic factors
    • Analyzes geographic regions
    • Every neighborhood in the U.S. can be profiled
    • Total of 62 lifestyle clusters
  • 18. International Lifestyles: GLOBAL SCAN
  • 19. GLOBAL SCAN Segment Sizes across Countries

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