1Figure 22-32 ÉDOUARD MANET, Le Déjeuner sur l’Herbe (Luncheon on the Grass), 1863. Oil on canvas, 7’ x 8’ 10”. Muséed’Ors...
Titian2
3
4Figure 22-33 ÉDOUARD MANET, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas, 4’ 3” x 6’ 2 1/4”. Musée d’Orsay, Paris.
5German and American Realism• Examine German artist’s interests in regional and nationalcharacteristics, folk customs and ...
6Figure 22-35 WINSLOW HOMER, Veteran in a New Field, 1865. Oil on canvas, 2’ 1/8” x 3’ 2 1/8”. MetropolitanMuseum of Art, ...
7Figure 22-36 THOMAS EAKINS, TheGross Clinic, 1875. Oil on canvas, 8’ x 6’6”. Philadelphia Museum of Art,Philadelphia.
8Figure 22-37 JOHN SINGER SARGENT, The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit, 1882. Oil on canvas, 7’ 3 3/8” x 7’ 3 5/8”.Museum ...
922.7 Photography• Examine the origins of photography and its impact in visualart.• Discuss initial uses of the new art me...
10Figure 22-48 LOUIS-JACQUES-MANDÉ DAGUERRE, Still Life in Studio, 1837. 6 1/4” x 8 1/4”. Daguerreotype.Collection Société...
11
12Figure 22-49 JOSIAH JOHNSON HAWES and ALBERT SANDS SOUTHWORTH, Early Operation under Ether, MassachusettsGeneral Hospita...
13Figure 22-50 NADAR, Eugène Delacroix, ca.1855. Modern print, 8 1/2”x 6 2/3” fromoriginal negative in the Bibliothèque Na...
14Figure 22-51 HONORÉ DAUMIER,Nadar Raising Photography to the Height of Art,1862. Lithograph, 10 3/4” x 8 3/4”.Museum of ...
15Figure 22-53 TIMOTHY O’SULLIVAN, A Harvest of Death, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 1863. Negative by TimothyO’Sullivan....
16Figure 22-54 EADWEARD MUYBRIDGE, Horse Galloping, 1878. Collotype print, 9” x 12”. George Eastman House,Rochester, New Y...
17Chapter 23Impressionism, Post-Impressionism,Symbolism: Europe and America,1870 to 1900Gardner’s Art Through the Ages,14e
France around 187018
19Industrialization of Europe and U.S. about 1850
20Impressionism• Asymmetrical Balance• Use of Colored Shadows• Use of Pure Color• Broken Color or Broken Brushstrokes• Use...
21Figure 23-2 CLAUDE MONET, Impression: Sunrise, 1872. Oil on canvas, 1’ 7 1/2” x 2’ 1 1/2”. Musée Marmottan, Paris.
23-2A CLAUDE MONET, Bank of the Seine, Bennecourt, 1868. Oil on canvas, 2’ 8" X 3’ 3 5/8”. Art Institute of Chicago, Chica...
23-1 ÉDOUARD MANET, Claude Monet in His Studio Boat, 1874. Oil on canvas, 2’ 8” X 3’ 3 1/4". Neue Pinakothek, Munich.23
24Figure 23-9 ÉDOUARD MANET, Bar at the Folies-Bergère, 1882. Oil on canvas, 3’ 1” x 4’ 3”. Courtauld Institute of ArtGall...
25Figure 23-3 CLAUDE MONET, Rouen Cathedral: ThePortal (in Sun), 1894. Oil on canvas, 3’ 3 1/4” x 2’ 1 7/8”.Metropolitan M...
26Figure 23-4 CLAUDE MONET, Saint-Lazare Train Station, 1877. Oil on canvas, 2’ 5 3/4” x 3’ 5”. Musée d’Orsay, Paris.
27Figure 23-5 GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE, Paris: A Rainy Day, 1877. Oil on canvas, 6’ 9” x 9’ 9”. The Art Institute ofChicago, Ch...
28Figure 23-6 CAMILLE PISSARRO, La Place du Théâtre Français, 1898. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4 1/2” x 3’ 1/2”. Los AngelesCounty ...
29Figure 28-8 PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR, Le Moulin de la Galette, 1876. Oil on canvas, 4’ 3” x 5’ 8”. Musée d’Orsay,Paris.
30Figure 23-10 EDGAR DEGAS, Ballet Rehearsal, 1874. Oil on canvas, 1’ 11” x 2’ 9”. Glasgow Art Galleries and Museum,Glasgo...
3123-7 BERTHE MORISOT, Villa at the Seaside, 1874. Oil on canvas, 1’ 7 3/4” x 2’ 1/8". Norton Simon Art Foundation,Los Ang...
23-7A BERTHE MORISOT, Summer’s Day, 1879. Oil on canvas, 1’ 5 3/4” X 2’ 5 3/8”. National Gallery, London (LaneBequest, 191...
33Japonisme and Later Impressionism• Examine issues of other Impressionist, such as the influenceof the Japanese print and...
Left: Figure 23-11 EDGAR DEGAS, The Tub, 1886. Pastel, 1’ 11 ½” X 2’ 8 3/8”. Musee d’Orsay, Paris.Right: Figure 23-12 TORI...
35Figure 23-13 MARY CASSATT, The Bath, ca. 1892. Oilon canvas, 3’ 3” x 2’ 2”. The Art Institute of Chicago,Chicago (Robert...
36Figure 23-14 JAMES ABBOTT MCNEILLWHISTLER, Nocturne in Black and Gold (TheFalling Rocket), ca. 1875. Oil on panel, 1’ 11...
37Figure 23-15 HENRI DE TOULOUSE-LAUTREC, At the Moulin Rouge, 1892–1895. Oil on canvas, 4’ x 4’ 7”. ArtInstitute of Chica...
23-15A HENRI DE TOULOUSE-LAUTREC, Jane Avril, 1893. Colorlithograph, 4’ 2 1/2” X 3’ 1”. San DiegoMuseum of Art, San Diego ...
3923.2 Post-Impressionism• Understand the differences in emotional expression andsubject choices between the Impressionist...
40Figure 23-16 GEORGES SEURAT, A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, 1884–1886. Oil on canvas, 6’ 9” x 10’. The Art Instituteof Chi...
41
42
23-16A VINCENT VAN GOGH, The Potato Eaters, 1885. Oil on canvas, 2’ 8 1/4” X 3’ 8 7/8". Rijksmuseum Vincent vanGogh, Amste...
44Figure 23-17 VINCENT VAN GOGH, Night Café, 1888. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4 1/2” x 3’. Yale University Art Gallery, NewHaven (b...
45Figure 23-18 VINCENT VAN GOGH, Starry Night, 1889. Oil on canvas, 2’ 5” x 3’ 1/4”. Museum of Modern Art, NewYork (acquir...
VINCENT VAN GOGH, Van Goghs Room at Arles46
VINCENT VAN GOGH,Sunflowers47
48
49Figure 23-19 PAUL GAUGUIN, Vision after the Sermon or Jacob Wrestling with the Angel, 1888. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4 3/4” x 3...
50Figure 23-20 PAUL GAUGUIN, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? 1897. Oil on canvas, 4’ 63/4” x 12’ 3...
51Post-Impressionist Form• Examine the extraordinary art of Cezanne and his interest inform, paving the way for Cubism.
52Figure 23-21 PAUL CÉZANNE, Mont Sainte-Victoire, 1902–1904. Oil on canvas, 2’ 3 1/2” x 2’ 11 1/4”. PhiladelphiaMuseum of...
53Figure 23-22 PAUL CÉZANNE, Basket of Apples, ca. 1895. Oil on canvas, 2’ 3/8” x 2’ 7”. The Art Institute of Chicago,Chic...
23-22A PAUL CÉZANNE, The Large Bathers, 1906. Oil on canvas, 6’ 10 7/8” X 8’ 2 3/4”. Philadelphia Museum of Art,Philadelph...
5523.3 Symbolism• Examine the issues of imagination, fantasy, and formalchanges in the art of the Symbolists.• Understand ...
56Figure 23-26 HENRI ROUSSEAU, Sleeping Gypsy, 1897. Oil on canvas, 4’ 3” x 6’ 7”. Museum of Modern Art, New York(gift of ...
23-26A HENRI ROUSSEAU, The Dream, 1910. Oil on canvas, 6’ 8 1/2" X 9’ 9 1/2”. Museum of Modern Art, New York (giftof Nelso...
23-27 JAMES ENSOR, Christ’s Entry into Brussels in 1889, 1888. Oil on canvas, 8’ 3 1/2” X 14’ 1 1/2”. J. Paul Getty Museum...
59Figure 23-28 EDVARD MUNCH, TheScream, 1893. Tempura and pastels oncardboard, 2’ 11 3/4” x 2’ 5”. NationalGallery, Oslo.
The Dance of Life60
The Vampire61
62Figure 23-29 GUSTAV KLIMT, The Kiss, 1907–1908. Oil on canvas, 5’ 10 3/4” x 5’ 10 3/4”. Österreichische GalerieBelvedere...
Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I63
Figure 23-30 GERTRUDE KASEBIER, Blessed Art Thouamong Women, 1899. Platinum print on Japanese tissue, 93/8” X 5 ½”. Museum...
6523.4 Sculpturein the Later 19thCentury• Examine the issues of realism and expression related tosculpture in the later 19...
66Sculpture: Realist and Expressive• Examine issues of realism, expression and subject matter insculpture of the later 19t...
67Figure 23-31 JEAN-BAPTISTE CARPEAUX, Ugolinoand His Children, 1865–1867. Marble, 6’ 5” high.Metropolitan Museum of Art, ...
23-31A JEAN-BAPTISTE CARPEAUX, TheDance, from the Opéra, Paris, France, 1867–1869.Limestone, 13’ 9 3/8” high. Musée d’Orsa...
Figure 23-32 AUGUSTE RODIN, Walking Man,1905. Bronze, 6’ 11 ¾” high. Musee d’Orsay, Paris.69
23-33 AUGUSTE RODIN, The Gates ofHell, 1880–1900. Posthumous bronzecast, 20’ 10” X 13’ 1”. Musée Rodin,Paris.70
Figure 23-32A AUGUSTE RODIN, Burghers of Calais, 1884-1889. Bronze, 6’ 10 ½” high, 7’ 11” long, 6’ 6”deep. Musee Rodin, Pa...
72
7323.5 Decorative Art: Arts and CraftsMovement and Art Nouveau• Examine the ideas of Ruskin and Morris in shaping the Arts...
74Objects and Décor of the Arts & Crafts• Understand the interest in aesthetic functional objects andthe preference for hi...
75Figure 23-34 WILLIAM MORRIS, Green Dining Room, South Kensington Museum (now Victoria & Albert Museum),London, England, ...
76Figure 23-35 CHARLES RENNIE MACKINTOSH and MARGARET MACDONALD MACKINTOSH,reconstruction (1992–1995) of Ladies’ Luncheon ...
77Art Nouveau Art and Architecture• Examine the organic natural forms in Art Nouveau art andarchitecture.
Figure 23-36 VICTOR HORTA, staircase in the Van Eetvelde House, Brussels, 1895.78
23-36A VICTOR HORTA, foyer andstairwell of the Tassel House, Brussels,Belgium, 1892–1893.79
80Figure 23-36B LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY,water lily lamp, 1904-1915
81Figure 23-37 ANTONIO GAUDI, Casa Milá, Barcelona, 1907.
82
83
84
85
8623.6 Architecturein the Later 19thCentury• Understand the new technology and changing needs of urbansociety and their ef...
87New Technology and Materials• Understand new technology, changing needs of urbansociety, and new materials in architectu...
Figure 23-38 ALEXANDRE-GUSTAVE EIFFEL,Eiffel Tower, Paris, France, 1889.88
89Figure 23-39 HENRYHOBSON RICHARDSON,Marshall Field wholesale store,Chicago, 1885–1887(demolished 1930).
90The Architecture of Louis Sullivan• Understand the issues of space and decoration in theremarkable work and theories of ...
91Figure 23-40 LOUIS HENRY SULLIVAN,Guaranty (Prudential) Building, Buffalo, 1894–1896.
23-40A LOUIS HENRY SULLIVAN, WainwrightBuilding, St. Louis, Missouri, 1890–1891.92
93Figure 23-41 LOUIS HENRY SULLIVAN, Carson, Pirie, Scott Building, Chicago, 1899–1904.
94Chapter 24Modernism in Europe and America,1900 to 1945Gardner’s Art Through the Ages,14e
95Colonial Empires About 1900
Figure 24-2 HENRI MATISSE, Woman with theHat, 1905. Oil on canvas, 2’ 7 ¾” X 1’ 11 ½”.San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.,...
97Figure 24-3 HENRI MATISSE, Red Room (Harmony in Red), 1908–1909. Oil on canvas, 5’ 11” x 8’ 1”. State HermitageMuseum, S...
98The German Expressionists• Examine the styles of the German Expressionists, especiallyDie Brucke and Der Blaue Reiter.• ...
99Figure 24-5 ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNER, Street, Dresden, 1908 (dated 1907). Oil on canvas, 4’ 11 1/4” x 6’ 6 7/8”.Museum of M...
ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNERStreet , Berlin100
101Figure 24-6 EMIL NOLDE, Saint Mary of Egypt among Sinners, 1912. Left panel of a triptych, oil on canvas, approx. 2’ 10...
24-6A EMIL NOLDE, Masks, 1911. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4 3/4" X 2’ 6 1/2”. Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City (gift ofthe ...
103Figure 24-7 VASSILY KANDINSKY, Improvisation 28 (second version), 1912. Oil on canvas, 3’ 7 7/8” x 5’ 3 7/8”.Solomon R....
Evolution of Cubism• Understand Pablo Picasso’s development as an artist up to theseminal works that preceded his Cubist w...
Picasso – Blue Period and Rose (Pink) Period105
106Figure 24-11 PABLO PICASSO, GertrudeStein, 1906–1907. Oil on canvas, 3’ 3 3/8”x 2’ 8”. Metropolitan Museum of Art, NewY...
107Figure 24-12 PABLOPICASSO, Les Demoisellesd’Avignon, 1907. Oil oncanvas, 8’ x 7’ 8”. Museumof Modern Art, New York(acqu...
108Figure 24-14 GEORGES BRAQUE, The Portuguese,1911. Oil on canvas, 3’ 10 1/8” x 2’ 8”.Kunstmuseum, Basel (gift of Raoul L...
109Figure 24-15A ROBERT DELAUNAY,Champs de Mars or The Red Tower, 1911. Oilon canvas, 5’ 3” x 4’ 3”. Art Institute ofChica...
ROBERT DELAUNAY,Homage to Bleriot, 1914110
111Figure 24-16 PABLO PICASSO, Still Life with Chair-Caning, 1912. Oil and oilcloth on canvas, 10 5/8” x 1’ 1 3/4”. MuséeP...
112Figure 24-17 GEORGES BRAQUE, Bottle, Newspaper, Pipe and Glass, 1913. Charcoal and various papers pasted on paper,1’ 6 ...
113Figure 24-19 PABLO PICASSO,maquette for Guitar, 1912. Cardboard,string, and wire (restored), 1’ 1 1/4” x 1” x7 1/2”. Mu...
24-19A PABLO PICASSO, Three Musicians, 1921. Oil on canvas, 6’ 7" X 7’ 3 3/4”. Museum of Modern Art, New York (Mrs.Simon G...
115Figure 24-18 PABLO PICASSO, Guernica, 1937. Oil on canvas, 11’ 5 1/2” x 25’ 5 3/4”. Museo Nacional Centro de ArteReina ...
116Figure 24-21A JACQUES LIPCHITZ, Bather, 1917. Bronze, 2’ 10 3/4” x 1’1 1/4” x 1’ 1”. Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansa...
117Figure 24-20 ALEKSANDR ARCHIPENKO, Woman Combing Her Hair, 1915.Bronze, 1’ 1 3/4” x 3 1/4” x 3 1/8”. Museum of Modern A...
118Figure 24-21 JULIO GONZÁLEZ, Woman Combing HerHair, ca. 1936. Iron, 4’4” x1’11 1/2”x2’5/8”. Museum ofModern Art, New Yo...
119Figure 24-22 FERNAND LÉGER, The City, 1919. Oil on canvas, 7’ 7” x 9’ 9 1/2”. Philadelphia Museum of Art,Philadelphia (...
29-22A FERNAND LÉGER, Three Women (Le Grand Déjeuner), 1921. Oil on canvas, 6’ 1/4" X 8’ 3”. Museum of Modern Art,New York...
Futurism• Explain the goals/objectives of the Futurists• Identify Futurist artists• Analyze Futurist works of art in terms...
122Figure 24-23 GIACOMO BALLA, Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash, 1912. Oil on canvas, 2’ 11 3/8” x 3’ 7 1/4”. Albright-Knox Ar...
123Figure 24-24 UMBERTO BOCCIONI,Unique Forms of Continuity in Space, 1913(cast 1931). Bronze, 3’ 7 7/8” x 2’ 10 7/8”x 1’ ...
124Figure 24-25 GINO SEVERINI, Armored Train,1915. Oil on canvas, 3’ 10” x 2’ 10 1/8”.Collection of Richard S. Zeisler, Ne...
125Dada• Understand the influence of the Dada movement with itsemphasis on spontaneity and intuition.• Understand the issu...
126Figure 24-26 JEAN (HANS) ARP, Collage ArrangedAccording to the Laws of Chance, 1916–1917. Torn andpasted paper, 1’ 7 1/...
127Figure 24-27 MARCEL DUCHAMP, Fountain, (second version), 1950 (original version produced 1917). Readymadeglazed sanitar...
24-27A MARCEL DUCHAMP, L.H.O.O.Q., 1919.Pencil on paper color reproduction of Leonardo daVinci’s Mona Lisa (FIG. 22-5), 7 ...
MARCEL DUCHAMP,The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even(The Large Glass),129
130Figure 24-28 MARCEL DUCHAMP, The Bride StrippedBare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Oil,lead, wire, ...
131
132Figure 24-1 HANNAH HÖCH, Cut with theKitchen Knife Dada through the Last Weimar BeerBelly Cultural Epoch of Germany, 19...
133Figure 24-29 KURT SCHWITTERS, Merz19, 1920. Paper collage, 7 1/4” x 5 7/8”. YaleUniversity Art Gallery, New Haven, (gif...
24.2 America, 1900 to 1930• Understand the gradual development of modernist art inAmerica• Understand the significance of ...
135The Remarkable Armory Show• Examine the art and artists of the influential Armory Show.
136Figure 24-35 MARCEL DUCHAMP, Nude Descending aStaircase, No. 2, 1912. Oil on canvas, 4’ 10 “x 2’ 11”.Philadelphia Museu...
137Figure 24-43 ALFRED STIEGLITZ, TheSteerage, 1907 (print 1915). Photogravure(on tissue), 1’ 3/8” x 10 1/8”. Courtesy ofA...
138American Art Forms• Examine the distinctive American art forms seem inphotography, art of the Harlem Renaissance, and p...
139Figure 24-37 MAN RAY, Cadeau (Gift), ca. 1958(replica of 1921 original). Painted flatiron with rowof 13 tacks with head...
140Figure 24-41 CHARLES DEMUTH,My Egypt, 1927. Oil on compositionboard, 2’ 11 3/4” x 2’ 6”. Collection ofWhitney Museum of...
141Figure 24-42 GEORGIA O’KEEFFE, New York, Night, 1929. Oil oncanvas, 3’ 4 1/8” x 1’ 7 1/8”. Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery...
142
14324.3 Europe, 1920 to 1945• Understand the intense realistic post-war expressionism ofGerman artists.• Understand the Eu...
144Post-war Expressionism• Understand the post-war expressionism of German artists.
Figure 24-9 KATHE KOLLWITZ, Woman with Dead Child, 1903. Etching and soft-ground etching,overprinted lithographically with...
146
147
148Surrealism• Examine the development, methods and content ofSurrealism.• Identify Surrealist artists.• Realize that the ...
149Figure 24-52 GIORGIO DE CHIRICO,The Song of Love, 1914. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4¾” x 1’ 11 3/8”. Museum of Modern Art,New Yo...
150Figure 24-53 MAX ERNST, TwoChildren Are Threatened by aNightingale, 1924. Oil on wood withwood construction, 2’ 3 1/2” ...
151Figure 24-55 SALVADOR DALÍ, The Persistence of Memory, 1931. Oil on canvas, 9 1/2” x 1’ 1”. Museum of Modern Art, NewYo...
152Figure 24-56 RENÉ MAGRITTE, The Treachery (or Perfidy) of Images, 1928–1929. Oil on canvas, 1’ 11 5/8” x 3’ 1”. LosAnge...
24-56A RENÉ MAGRITTE, The False Mirror, 1928. Oil on canvas, 1’ 9 1/4" X 2’ 7 7/8”. Museum of Modern Art, New York.153
154Figure 24-57 MERET OPPENHEIM, Object (Le Déjeuner en fourrure), 1936. Fur-covered cup, 4 3/8” diameter; saucer, 93/8” d...
155Figure 24-58 JOAN MIRÓ, Painting, 1933. 5’ 8” x 6’ 5”. Museum of Modern Art, New York (Loula D. Lasker Bequest byexchan...
156Figure 24-59 PAUL KLEE, Twittering Machine,1922. Watercolor and pen and ink, on oil transferdrawing on paper, mounted o...
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Quiz 4 image list

  1. 1. 1Figure 22-32 ÉDOUARD MANET, Le Déjeuner sur l’Herbe (Luncheon on the Grass), 1863. Oil on canvas, 7’ x 8’ 10”. Muséed’Orsay, Paris.
  2. 2. Titian2
  3. 3. 3
  4. 4. 4Figure 22-33 ÉDOUARD MANET, Olympia, 1863. Oil on canvas, 4’ 3” x 6’ 2 1/4”. Musée d’Orsay, Paris.
  5. 5. 5German and American Realism• Examine German artist’s interests in regional and nationalcharacteristics, folk customs and culture.• Identify the American artists and key works of Realist art.
  6. 6. 6Figure 22-35 WINSLOW HOMER, Veteran in a New Field, 1865. Oil on canvas, 2’ 1/8” x 3’ 2 1/8”. MetropolitanMuseum of Art, New York (bequest of Miss Adelaide Milton de Groot, 1967).
  7. 7. 7Figure 22-36 THOMAS EAKINS, TheGross Clinic, 1875. Oil on canvas, 8’ x 6’6”. Philadelphia Museum of Art,Philadelphia.
  8. 8. 8Figure 22-37 JOHN SINGER SARGENT, The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit, 1882. Oil on canvas, 7’ 3 3/8” x 7’ 3 5/8”.Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (gift of Mary Louisa Boit, Florence D. Boit, Jane Hubbard Boit, and Julia Overing Boit, inmemory of their father, Edward Darley Boit).
  9. 9. 922.7 Photography• Examine the origins of photography and its impact in visualart.• Discuss initial uses of the new art medium known asphotography.• Recognize the artists and the works of early photography.• Examine artist’s use and response to the technology ofphotography.
  10. 10. 10Figure 22-48 LOUIS-JACQUES-MANDÉ DAGUERRE, Still Life in Studio, 1837. 6 1/4” x 8 1/4”. Daguerreotype.Collection Société Française de Photographie, Paris.
  11. 11. 11
  12. 12. 12Figure 22-49 JOSIAH JOHNSON HAWES and ALBERT SANDS SOUTHWORTH, Early Operation under Ether, MassachusettsGeneral Hospital, ca. 1847. Daguerreotype. Massachusetts General Hospital Archives and Special Collections, Boston.
  13. 13. 13Figure 22-50 NADAR, Eugène Delacroix, ca.1855. Modern print, 8 1/2”x 6 2/3” fromoriginal negative in the Bibliothèque Nationale,Paris.
  14. 14. 14Figure 22-51 HONORÉ DAUMIER,Nadar Raising Photography to the Height of Art,1862. Lithograph, 10 3/4” x 8 3/4”.Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
  15. 15. 15Figure 22-53 TIMOTHY O’SULLIVAN, A Harvest of Death, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 1863. Negative by TimothyO’Sullivan. Original print by ALEXANDER GARDNER, 6 3/4" x 8 3/4". New York Public Library (Astor, Lenox andTilden Foundations, Rare Books and Manuscript Division), New York.
  16. 16. 16Figure 22-54 EADWEARD MUYBRIDGE, Horse Galloping, 1878. Collotype print, 9” x 12”. George Eastman House,Rochester, New York.
  17. 17. 17Chapter 23Impressionism, Post-Impressionism,Symbolism: Europe and America,1870 to 1900Gardner’s Art Through the Ages,14e
  18. 18. France around 187018
  19. 19. 19Industrialization of Europe and U.S. about 1850
  20. 20. 20Impressionism• Asymmetrical Balance• Use of Colored Shadows• Use of Pure Color• Broken Color or Broken Brushstrokes• Use of Impasto (or Thick Paint)• Subject Matter• High Horizontal Line• Photographic Influence• Influence of Japanese Prints• Painted "En Plein Air"John Singleton Copley
  21. 21. 21Figure 23-2 CLAUDE MONET, Impression: Sunrise, 1872. Oil on canvas, 1’ 7 1/2” x 2’ 1 1/2”. Musée Marmottan, Paris.
  22. 22. 23-2A CLAUDE MONET, Bank of the Seine, Bennecourt, 1868. Oil on canvas, 2’ 8" X 3’ 3 5/8”. Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago(Potter Palmer Collection).22
  23. 23. 23-1 ÉDOUARD MANET, Claude Monet in His Studio Boat, 1874. Oil on canvas, 2’ 8” X 3’ 3 1/4". Neue Pinakothek, Munich.23
  24. 24. 24Figure 23-9 ÉDOUARD MANET, Bar at the Folies-Bergère, 1882. Oil on canvas, 3’ 1” x 4’ 3”. Courtauld Institute of ArtGallery, London.
  25. 25. 25Figure 23-3 CLAUDE MONET, Rouen Cathedral: ThePortal (in Sun), 1894. Oil on canvas, 3’ 3 1/4” x 2’ 1 7/8”.Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (Theodore M.Davis Collection, bequest of Theodore M. Davis, 1915).
  26. 26. 26Figure 23-4 CLAUDE MONET, Saint-Lazare Train Station, 1877. Oil on canvas, 2’ 5 3/4” x 3’ 5”. Musée d’Orsay, Paris.
  27. 27. 27Figure 23-5 GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE, Paris: A Rainy Day, 1877. Oil on canvas, 6’ 9” x 9’ 9”. The Art Institute ofChicago, Chicago, (Worcester Fund).
  28. 28. 28Figure 23-6 CAMILLE PISSARRO, La Place du Théâtre Français, 1898. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4 1/2” x 3’ 1/2”. Los AngelesCounty Museum of Art, Los Angeles (the Mr. and Mrs. George Gard De Sylva Collection).
  29. 29. 29Figure 28-8 PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR, Le Moulin de la Galette, 1876. Oil on canvas, 4’ 3” x 5’ 8”. Musée d’Orsay,Paris.
  30. 30. 30Figure 23-10 EDGAR DEGAS, Ballet Rehearsal, 1874. Oil on canvas, 1’ 11” x 2’ 9”. Glasgow Art Galleries and Museum,Glasgow (Burrell Collection).
  31. 31. 3123-7 BERTHE MORISOT, Villa at the Seaside, 1874. Oil on canvas, 1’ 7 3/4” x 2’ 1/8". Norton Simon Art Foundation,Los Angeles.
  32. 32. 23-7A BERTHE MORISOT, Summer’s Day, 1879. Oil on canvas, 1’ 5 3/4” X 2’ 5 3/8”. National Gallery, London (LaneBequest, 1917).32
  33. 33. 33Japonisme and Later Impressionism• Examine issues of other Impressionist, such as the influenceof the Japanese print and concerns with formal elements.
  34. 34. Left: Figure 23-11 EDGAR DEGAS, The Tub, 1886. Pastel, 1’ 11 ½” X 2’ 8 3/8”. Musee d’Orsay, Paris.Right: Figure 23-12 TORII KIYONAGA, detail of Two Women at the Bath, ca. 1780. Color woodblock, full print 10½” X 7 ½”, detail 3 ¾” X 3 ½”. Musee Guimet, Paris.34
  35. 35. 35Figure 23-13 MARY CASSATT, The Bath, ca. 1892. Oilon canvas, 3’ 3” x 2’ 2”. The Art Institute of Chicago,Chicago (Robert A. Walker Fund).
  36. 36. 36Figure 23-14 JAMES ABBOTT MCNEILLWHISTLER, Nocturne in Black and Gold (TheFalling Rocket), ca. 1875. Oil on panel, 1’ 115/8” x 1’ 6 1/2”. Detroit Institute of Arts,Detroit (gift of Dexter M. Ferry Jr.).
  37. 37. 37Figure 23-15 HENRI DE TOULOUSE-LAUTREC, At the Moulin Rouge, 1892–1895. Oil on canvas, 4’ x 4’ 7”. ArtInstitute of Chicago, Chicago (Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection).
  38. 38. 23-15A HENRI DE TOULOUSE-LAUTREC, Jane Avril, 1893. Colorlithograph, 4’ 2 1/2” X 3’ 1”. San DiegoMuseum of Art, San Diego (gift of theBaldwin M. Baldwin Foundation).38
  39. 39. 3923.2 Post-Impressionism• Understand the differences in emotional expression andsubject choices between the Impressionists and the Post-Impressionists.• Understand the Post-Impressionist experimentation withform and color.• Recognize the individuality of the Post-Impressionist artistsand the styles each one developed.
  40. 40. 40Figure 23-16 GEORGES SEURAT, A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, 1884–1886. Oil on canvas, 6’ 9” x 10’. The Art Instituteof Chicago, Chicago (Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection, 1926).
  41. 41. 41
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  43. 43. 23-16A VINCENT VAN GOGH, The Potato Eaters, 1885. Oil on canvas, 2’ 8 1/4” X 3’ 8 7/8". Rijksmuseum Vincent vanGogh, Amsterdam.43
  44. 44. 44Figure 23-17 VINCENT VAN GOGH, Night Café, 1888. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4 1/2” x 3’. Yale University Art Gallery, NewHaven (bequest of Stephen Carlton Clark).
  45. 45. 45Figure 23-18 VINCENT VAN GOGH, Starry Night, 1889. Oil on canvas, 2’ 5” x 3’ 1/4”. Museum of Modern Art, NewYork (acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest).
  46. 46. VINCENT VAN GOGH, Van Goghs Room at Arles46
  47. 47. VINCENT VAN GOGH,Sunflowers47
  48. 48. 48
  49. 49. 49Figure 23-19 PAUL GAUGUIN, Vision after the Sermon or Jacob Wrestling with the Angel, 1888. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4 3/4” x 3’1/2”. National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh.
  50. 50. 50Figure 23-20 PAUL GAUGUIN, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? 1897. Oil on canvas, 4’ 63/4” x 12’ 3”. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (Tompkins Collection).
  51. 51. 51Post-Impressionist Form• Examine the extraordinary art of Cezanne and his interest inform, paving the way for Cubism.
  52. 52. 52Figure 23-21 PAUL CÉZANNE, Mont Sainte-Victoire, 1902–1904. Oil on canvas, 2’ 3 1/2” x 2’ 11 1/4”. PhiladelphiaMuseum of Art, Philadelphia (The George W. Elkins Collection).
  53. 53. 53Figure 23-22 PAUL CÉZANNE, Basket of Apples, ca. 1895. Oil on canvas, 2’ 3/8” x 2’ 7”. The Art Institute of Chicago,Chicago (Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection, 1926).
  54. 54. 23-22A PAUL CÉZANNE, The Large Bathers, 1906. Oil on canvas, 6’ 10 7/8” X 8’ 2 3/4”. Philadelphia Museum of Art,Philadelphia (W.P. Wilstach Collection).54
  55. 55. 5523.3 Symbolism• Examine the issues of imagination, fantasy, and formalchanges in the art of the Symbolists.• Understand the expression of “modern psychic life” in theart of the Symbolists.• Became increasingly esoteric and exotic, mysterious,visionary, dreamlike, and fantastic.
  56. 56. 56Figure 23-26 HENRI ROUSSEAU, Sleeping Gypsy, 1897. Oil on canvas, 4’ 3” x 6’ 7”. Museum of Modern Art, New York(gift of Mrs. Simon Guggenheim).
  57. 57. 23-26A HENRI ROUSSEAU, The Dream, 1910. Oil on canvas, 6’ 8 1/2" X 9’ 9 1/2”. Museum of Modern Art, New York (giftof Nelson A. Rockefeller).57
  58. 58. 23-27 JAMES ENSOR, Christ’s Entry into Brussels in 1889, 1888. Oil on canvas, 8’ 3 1/2” X 14’ 1 1/2”. J. Paul Getty Museum,Los Angeles.58
  59. 59. 59Figure 23-28 EDVARD MUNCH, TheScream, 1893. Tempura and pastels oncardboard, 2’ 11 3/4” x 2’ 5”. NationalGallery, Oslo.
  60. 60. The Dance of Life60
  61. 61. The Vampire61
  62. 62. 62Figure 23-29 GUSTAV KLIMT, The Kiss, 1907–1908. Oil on canvas, 5’ 10 3/4” x 5’ 10 3/4”. Österreichische GalerieBelvedere,Vienna.
  63. 63. Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I63
  64. 64. Figure 23-30 GERTRUDE KASEBIER, Blessed Art Thouamong Women, 1899. Platinum print on Japanese tissue, 93/8” X 5 ½”. Museum of Modern Art, New York (gift ofMrs. Hermine M. Turner).64
  65. 65. 6523.4 Sculpturein the Later 19thCentury• Examine the issues of realism and expression related tosculpture in the later 19thcentury.• Understand the selection of contemporary subject matter bysculptors.• Recognize representative sculptors and works of the later 19thcentury.
  66. 66. 66Sculpture: Realist and Expressive• Examine issues of realism, expression and subject matter insculpture of the later 19thcentury.
  67. 67. 67Figure 23-31 JEAN-BAPTISTE CARPEAUX, Ugolinoand His Children, 1865–1867. Marble, 6’ 5” high.Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (JosephineBay Paul and C. Michael Paul Foundation, Inc. and theCharles Ulrich and Josephine Bay Foundation, Inc.,gifts, 1967).
  68. 68. 23-31A JEAN-BAPTISTE CARPEAUX, TheDance, from the Opéra, Paris, France, 1867–1869.Limestone, 13’ 9 3/8” high. Musée d’Orsay, Paris.68
  69. 69. Figure 23-32 AUGUSTE RODIN, Walking Man,1905. Bronze, 6’ 11 ¾” high. Musee d’Orsay, Paris.69
  70. 70. 23-33 AUGUSTE RODIN, The Gates ofHell, 1880–1900. Posthumous bronzecast, 20’ 10” X 13’ 1”. Musée Rodin,Paris.70
  71. 71. Figure 23-32A AUGUSTE RODIN, Burghers of Calais, 1884-1889. Bronze, 6’ 10 ½” high, 7’ 11” long, 6’ 6”deep. Musee Rodin, Paris.71
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  73. 73. 7323.5 Decorative Art: Arts and CraftsMovement and Art Nouveau• Examine the ideas of Ruskin and Morris in shaping the Artsand Crafts Movement.• Understand the interest in aesthetic functional objects in theArts and Crafts Movement.• Examine the preference for high-quality artisanship andhonest labor.• Examine the organic forms of Art Nouveau in art andarchitecture.
  74. 74. 74Objects and Décor of the Arts & Crafts• Understand the interest in aesthetic functional objects andthe preference for high-quality artisanship and honest labor.
  75. 75. 75Figure 23-34 WILLIAM MORRIS, Green Dining Room, South Kensington Museum (now Victoria & Albert Museum),London, England, 1867.
  76. 76. 76Figure 23-35 CHARLES RENNIE MACKINTOSH and MARGARET MACDONALD MACKINTOSH,reconstruction (1992–1995) of Ladies’ Luncheon Room, Ingram Street Tea Room, Glasgow, Scotland, 1900–1912.Glasgow Museum, Glasgow.
  77. 77. 77Art Nouveau Art and Architecture• Examine the organic natural forms in Art Nouveau art andarchitecture.
  78. 78. Figure 23-36 VICTOR HORTA, staircase in the Van Eetvelde House, Brussels, 1895.78
  79. 79. 23-36A VICTOR HORTA, foyer andstairwell of the Tassel House, Brussels,Belgium, 1892–1893.79
  80. 80. 80Figure 23-36B LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY,water lily lamp, 1904-1915
  81. 81. 81Figure 23-37 ANTONIO GAUDI, Casa Milá, Barcelona, 1907.
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  85. 85. 85
  86. 86. 8623.6 Architecturein the Later 19thCentury• Understand the new technology and changing needs of urbansociety and their effects on architecture.• Examine new materials use in architecture and the formsmade possible as a result.• Understand how architects were able to think differentlyabout space as a result of new technology and materials.• Examine the remarkable work and theories of Louis Sullivan.
  87. 87. 87New Technology and Materials• Understand new technology, changing needs of urbansociety, and new materials in architecture.
  88. 88. Figure 23-38 ALEXANDRE-GUSTAVE EIFFEL,Eiffel Tower, Paris, France, 1889.88
  89. 89. 89Figure 23-39 HENRYHOBSON RICHARDSON,Marshall Field wholesale store,Chicago, 1885–1887(demolished 1930).
  90. 90. 90The Architecture of Louis Sullivan• Understand the issues of space and decoration in theremarkable work and theories of Louis Sullivan.
  91. 91. 91Figure 23-40 LOUIS HENRY SULLIVAN,Guaranty (Prudential) Building, Buffalo, 1894–1896.
  92. 92. 23-40A LOUIS HENRY SULLIVAN, WainwrightBuilding, St. Louis, Missouri, 1890–1891.92
  93. 93. 93Figure 23-41 LOUIS HENRY SULLIVAN, Carson, Pirie, Scott Building, Chicago, 1899–1904.
  94. 94. 94Chapter 24Modernism in Europe and America,1900 to 1945Gardner’s Art Through the Ages,14e
  95. 95. 95Colonial Empires About 1900
  96. 96. Figure 24-2 HENRI MATISSE, Woman with theHat, 1905. Oil on canvas, 2’ 7 ¾” X 1’ 11 ½”.San Francisco Museum of Modern Art., SanFrancisco (bequest of Elise S. Haas).96
  97. 97. 97Figure 24-3 HENRI MATISSE, Red Room (Harmony in Red), 1908–1909. Oil on canvas, 5’ 11” x 8’ 1”. State HermitageMuseum, Saint Petersburg.
  98. 98. 98The German Expressionists• Examine the styles of the German Expressionists, especiallyDie Brucke and Der Blaue Reiter.• Analyze the use of line, color, space, and emotion in thework of the German Expressionists.• Understand the various influences on the work of theGerman Expressionists.
  99. 99. 99Figure 24-5 ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNER, Street, Dresden, 1908 (dated 1907). Oil on canvas, 4’ 11 1/4” x 6’ 6 7/8”.Museum of Modern Art, New York.
  100. 100. ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNERStreet , Berlin100
  101. 101. 101Figure 24-6 EMIL NOLDE, Saint Mary of Egypt among Sinners, 1912. Left panel of a triptych, oil on canvas, approx. 2’ 10”x 3’ 3”. Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg.
  102. 102. 24-6A EMIL NOLDE, Masks, 1911. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4 3/4" X 2’ 6 1/2”. Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City (gift ofthe Friends of Art).102
  103. 103. 103Figure 24-7 VASSILY KANDINSKY, Improvisation 28 (second version), 1912. Oil on canvas, 3’ 7 7/8” x 5’ 3 7/8”.Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (gift of Solomon R. Guggenheim, 1937).
  104. 104. Evolution of Cubism• Understand Pablo Picasso’s development as an artist up to theseminal works that preceded his Cubist work• Identify Gertrude Stein and her contributions to avant-gardeartists like Picasso and Matisse• Realize that Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque collaborated inthe development of Cubism• Understand primitivism and recognize its influence on Picasso• Analyze Cubist use of line and shape as well as space and color• Differentiate between Analytic and Synthetic Cubism• Recognize other Cubist artists including Cubist sculptors• Understand the meaning of Purism104
  105. 105. Picasso – Blue Period and Rose (Pink) Period105
  106. 106. 106Figure 24-11 PABLO PICASSO, GertrudeStein, 1906–1907. Oil on canvas, 3’ 3 3/8”x 2’ 8”. Metropolitan Museum of Art, NewYork (bequest of Gertrude Stein, 1947).
  107. 107. 107Figure 24-12 PABLOPICASSO, Les Demoisellesd’Avignon, 1907. Oil oncanvas, 8’ x 7’ 8”. Museumof Modern Art, New York(acquired through the LillieP. Bliss Bequest).Early Sketch
  108. 108. 108Figure 24-14 GEORGES BRAQUE, The Portuguese,1911. Oil on canvas, 3’ 10 1/8” x 2’ 8”.Kunstmuseum, Basel (gift of Raoul La Roche, 1952).PABLO PICASSO
  109. 109. 109Figure 24-15A ROBERT DELAUNAY,Champs de Mars or The Red Tower, 1911. Oilon canvas, 5’ 3” x 4’ 3”. Art Institute ofChicago, Chicago.
  110. 110. ROBERT DELAUNAY,Homage to Bleriot, 1914110
  111. 111. 111Figure 24-16 PABLO PICASSO, Still Life with Chair-Caning, 1912. Oil and oilcloth on canvas, 10 5/8” x 1’ 1 3/4”. MuséePicasso, Paris.
  112. 112. 112Figure 24-17 GEORGES BRAQUE, Bottle, Newspaper, Pipe and Glass, 1913. Charcoal and various papers pasted on paper,1’ 6 7/8” x 2’ 1 1/4”. Private collection, New York.
  113. 113. 113Figure 24-19 PABLO PICASSO,maquette for Guitar, 1912. Cardboard,string, and wire (restored), 1’ 1 1/4” x 1” x7 1/2”. Museum of Modern Art, NewYork.
  114. 114. 24-19A PABLO PICASSO, Three Musicians, 1921. Oil on canvas, 6’ 7" X 7’ 3 3/4”. Museum of Modern Art, New York (Mrs.Simon Guggenheim Fund).114
  115. 115. 115Figure 24-18 PABLO PICASSO, Guernica, 1937. Oil on canvas, 11’ 5 1/2” x 25’ 5 3/4”. Museo Nacional Centro de ArteReina Sofia, Madrid.
  116. 116. 116Figure 24-21A JACQUES LIPCHITZ, Bather, 1917. Bronze, 2’ 10 3/4” x 1’1 1/4” x 1’ 1”. Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City (gift of theFriends of Art).
  117. 117. 117Figure 24-20 ALEKSANDR ARCHIPENKO, Woman Combing Her Hair, 1915.Bronze, 1’ 1 3/4” x 3 1/4” x 3 1/8”. Museum of Modern Art, New York (acquiredthrough the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest).
  118. 118. 118Figure 24-21 JULIO GONZÁLEZ, Woman Combing HerHair, ca. 1936. Iron, 4’4” x1’11 1/2”x2’5/8”. Museum ofModern Art, New York (Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund).
  119. 119. 119Figure 24-22 FERNAND LÉGER, The City, 1919. Oil on canvas, 7’ 7” x 9’ 9 1/2”. Philadelphia Museum of Art,Philadelphia (A. E. Gallatin Collection).
  120. 120. 29-22A FERNAND LÉGER, Three Women (Le Grand Déjeuner), 1921. Oil on canvas, 6’ 1/4" X 8’ 3”. Museum of Modern Art,New York (Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund).120
  121. 121. Futurism• Explain the goals/objectives of the Futurists• Identify Futurist artists• Analyze Futurist works of art in terms of line, color, and space• Make comparisons between Futurism and other artisticmovements• Understand the chronological placement of Futurism121
  122. 122. 122Figure 24-23 GIACOMO BALLA, Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash, 1912. Oil on canvas, 2’ 11 3/8” x 3’ 7 1/4”. Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York (bequest of A. Conger Goodyear, gift of George F. Goodyear, 1964).
  123. 123. 123Figure 24-24 UMBERTO BOCCIONI,Unique Forms of Continuity in Space, 1913(cast 1931). Bronze, 3’ 7 7/8” x 2’ 10 7/8”x 1’ 3 3/4”. Museum of Modern Art, NewYork (acquired through the Lillie P. BlissBequest).
  124. 124. 124Figure 24-25 GINO SEVERINI, Armored Train,1915. Oil on canvas, 3’ 10” x 2’ 10 1/8”.Collection of Richard S. Zeisler, New York.
  125. 125. 125Dada• Understand the influence of the Dada movement with itsemphasis on spontaneity and intuition.• Understand the issues of anarchy and chance as they apply toform and content in visual art.• Recognize the rejection of convention in Dada and itsreaction to world events.• Appreciate the impact of Dada on the development of 20thand 21stcentury art• Identify Dada artists
  126. 126. 126Figure 24-26 JEAN (HANS) ARP, Collage ArrangedAccording to the Laws of Chance, 1916–1917. Torn andpasted paper, 1’ 7 1/8” x 1’ 1 5/8”. Museum ofModern Art, New York.
  127. 127. 127Figure 24-27 MARCEL DUCHAMP, Fountain, (second version), 1950 (original version produced 1917). Readymadeglazed sanitary china with black paint, 1’ high. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia.
  128. 128. 24-27A MARCEL DUCHAMP, L.H.O.O.Q., 1919.Pencil on paper color reproduction of Leonardo daVinci’s Mona Lisa (FIG. 22-5), 7 3/4" X 4 7/8”.Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia (Louise andWalter Arensberg Collection).128
  129. 129. MARCEL DUCHAMP,The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even(The Large Glass),129
  130. 130. 130Figure 24-28 MARCEL DUCHAMP, The Bride StrippedBare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Oil,lead, wire, foil, dust, and varnish on glass, 9’ 1 1/2” x 5’ 91/8”. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia (KatherineS. Dreier Bequest).
  131. 131. 131
  132. 132. 132Figure 24-1 HANNAH HÖCH, Cut with theKitchen Knife Dada through the Last Weimar BeerBelly Cultural Epoch of Germany, 1919–1920.Photomontage, 3’ 9” x 2’ 11 1/2”. NeueNationalgalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin,Berlin.
  133. 133. 133Figure 24-29 KURT SCHWITTERS, Merz19, 1920. Paper collage, 7 1/4” x 5 7/8”. YaleUniversity Art Gallery, New Haven, (gift ofCollection Société Anonyme).
  134. 134. 24.2 America, 1900 to 1930• Understand the gradual development of modernist art inAmerica• Understand the significance of the Armory Show of 1913• Recognize the work of major American artists of the first half ofthe 20thcentury and describe their artistic goals/objectives• Examine the diverse artistic techniques, media, and approachesto line, color, and space taken by these American artists134
  135. 135. 135The Remarkable Armory Show• Examine the art and artists of the influential Armory Show.
  136. 136. 136Figure 24-35 MARCEL DUCHAMP, Nude Descending aStaircase, No. 2, 1912. Oil on canvas, 4’ 10 “x 2’ 11”.Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia (Louise and WalterArensberg Collection).
  137. 137. 137Figure 24-43 ALFRED STIEGLITZ, TheSteerage, 1907 (print 1915). Photogravure(on tissue), 1’ 3/8” x 10 1/8”. Courtesy ofAmon Carter Museum, Fort Worth.
  138. 138. 138American Art Forms• Examine the distinctive American art forms seem inphotography, art of the Harlem Renaissance, and precisionistforms of Cubism.
  139. 139. 139Figure 24-37 MAN RAY, Cadeau (Gift), ca. 1958(replica of 1921 original). Painted flatiron with rowof 13 tacks with heads glued to the bottom, 6 1/8”x 3 5/8” x 4 1/2”. Museum of Modern Art, NewYork (James Thrall Soby Fund).Indestructible Object
  140. 140. 140Figure 24-41 CHARLES DEMUTH,My Egypt, 1927. Oil on compositionboard, 2’ 11 3/4” x 2’ 6”. Collection ofWhitney Museum of American Art, NewYork (purchased with funds fromGertrude Vanderbilt Whitney).
  141. 141. 141Figure 24-42 GEORGIA O’KEEFFE, New York, Night, 1929. Oil oncanvas, 3’ 4 1/8” x 1’ 7 1/8”. Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, Lincoln,(Nebraska Art Association, Thomas C. Woods Memorial Collection).Jack in the Pulpit No. 4
  142. 142. 142
  143. 143. 14324.3 Europe, 1920 to 1945• Understand the intense realistic post-war expressionism ofGerman artists.• Understand the European post-war malaise and theimportance of cathartic subject matter in Expressionist art.• Examine the origins, development, methods and content ofSurrealism and Fantasy art.
  144. 144. 144Post-war Expressionism• Understand the post-war expressionism of German artists.
  145. 145. Figure 24-9 KATHE KOLLWITZ, Woman with Dead Child, 1903. Etching and soft-ground etching,overprinted lithographically with a gold tone plate, 1’ 4 5/8” X 1’ 7 1/8”. British Museum, London.145
  146. 146. 146
  147. 147. 147
  148. 148. 148Surrealism• Examine the development, methods and content ofSurrealism.• Identify Surrealist artists.• Realize that the Surrealists were influenced by Dada
  149. 149. 149Figure 24-52 GIORGIO DE CHIRICO,The Song of Love, 1914. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4¾” x 1’ 11 3/8”. Museum of Modern Art,New York.
  150. 150. 150Figure 24-53 MAX ERNST, TwoChildren Are Threatened by aNightingale, 1924. Oil on wood withwood construction, 2’ 3 1/2” x 1’ 101/2” x 4 1/2”. Museum of ModernArt, New York.
  151. 151. 151Figure 24-55 SALVADOR DALÍ, The Persistence of Memory, 1931. Oil on canvas, 9 1/2” x 1’ 1”. Museum of Modern Art, NewYork.
  152. 152. 152Figure 24-56 RENÉ MAGRITTE, The Treachery (or Perfidy) of Images, 1928–1929. Oil on canvas, 1’ 11 5/8” x 3’ 1”. LosAngeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles (purchased with funds provided by the Mr. and Mrs. William PrestonHarrison Collection).
  153. 153. 24-56A RENÉ MAGRITTE, The False Mirror, 1928. Oil on canvas, 1’ 9 1/4" X 2’ 7 7/8”. Museum of Modern Art, New York.153
  154. 154. 154Figure 24-57 MERET OPPENHEIM, Object (Le Déjeuner en fourrure), 1936. Fur-covered cup, 4 3/8” diameter; saucer, 93/8” diameter; spoon, 8” long. Museum of Modern Art, New York.
  155. 155. 155Figure 24-58 JOAN MIRÓ, Painting, 1933. 5’ 8” x 6’ 5”. Museum of Modern Art, New York (Loula D. Lasker Bequest byexchange).
  156. 156. 156Figure 24-59 PAUL KLEE, Twittering Machine,1922. Watercolor and pen and ink, on oil transferdrawing on paper, mounted on cardboard, 2’ 1” x1’ 7”. Museum of Modern Art, New York.
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