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1.   Evaluation of congenital & acquired ureteral obstruction.2.   Elucidation of filling defects and deformities of the u...
• Usually done in the dorsal lithotomy position.• A KUB film is taken to confirm correct positioning, and exposes  kidney ...
1.   Urinary tract infections2.   Patients who cannot or should not be cystoscoped (e.g. patients     recover ing from rec...
1.   Difficult identification of the orifice in case of inflammatory or     neoplastic bladder changes (Helped by IV injec...
Backflow of contrast which may cause upward introduction of Infection & absorption of contrast.A.     Pyelotubular Backflo...
Historically the term “loopogram” has been associated with ileal conduitdiversion but may be used in reference to any bowe...
• Supine position.• A KUB film is taken to confirm correct positioning, and exposes  kidney stones or bladder stones.• A s...
1.   Evaluation of ureteral stricture disease (anterior)2.   Assessment for foreign bodies3.   Evaluation of penile or ure...
• The patient is usually positioned slightly obliquely (45o) and dependent  gip flexed to allow evaluation of the full len...
Urethral trauma- urethral stretch                ©
Urethral trauma- rupture above pelvic             diaphragm                  ©
Urethral trauma- rupture above pelvic             diaphragm                  ©
Urethral trauma- rupture below pelvic             diaphragm                  ©
Bladder trauma- anterior urethra               ©
1.   Evaluation of intravesical pathology2.   Evaluation of bladder diverticula3.   Evaluation of inguinal hernia involvin...
• The patient is usually positioned in supine position• A KUB film is taken to confirm correct positioning, and exposes ki...
1.   Evaluation of structural and functional bladder outlet obstruction     (post. ureth. Strict. and PUV).2.   Evaluation...
• The patient is usually positioned in supine position• A KUB film is taken to confirm correct positioning, and exposes ki...
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
Imaging in urology: part 2  other conventional imaging
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Imaging in urology: part 2 other conventional imaging

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Imaging in urology: part 2 other conventional imaging
by Ahmad Al-Sabbagh & revised by M.A. Wadood
for more resources:
uronotes2012.blogspot.com

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Transcript of "Imaging in urology: part 2 other conventional imaging"

  1. 1. 1. Evaluation of congenital & acquired ureteral obstruction.2. Elucidation of filling defects and deformities of the ureters or intrarenal collecting systems.3. Opacification or distention of collecting system to assist percutaneous access.4. In conjunction with ureteroscopy or stent placement.5. Evaluation of hematuria.6. Surveillance of transitional cell carcinoma.7. In the evaluation of traumatic or iatrogenic injury to the ureter or collecting system.
  2. 2. • Usually done in the dorsal lithotomy position.• A KUB film is taken to confirm correct positioning, and exposes kidney stones or bladder stones.• Cystoscopy is performed and a catheter is inserted in the ureteral orifice through which the contrast medium is injected• Documentary still images or “spot films” may be saved for evaluation during peristalsis & for future comparison
  3. 3. 1. Urinary tract infections2. Patients who cannot or should not be cystoscoped (e.g. patients recover ing from recent bladder or urethral surger y).
  4. 4. 1. Difficult identification of the orifice in case of inflammatory or neoplastic bladder changes (Helped by IV injection of Methylin Blue)2. Changes associated with Bladder outlet obstruction causes angulation of the intramural part of the ureter which may result in trauma during canulation of the orifice
  5. 5. Backflow of contrast which may cause upward introduction of Infection & absorption of contrast.A. Pyelotubular Backflow: C. Pyelovenous Backflow: B. Pyelosinus Backflow:Injection under pressure → contrast enters the venous Calyceal tear → leakageOpacification of medullary system → visualization to the renal sinuspyramids. of the renal vein D. Pyelolymphatic Backflow: contrast enters the lymphatics in the renal hilum
  6. 6. Historically the term “loopogram” has been associated with ileal conduitdiversion but may be used in reference to any bowel segment serving asa urinary conduit (Pouch-o-gram is a more accurate discription)1. Evaluation of infection, hematuria, renal insufficiency, or pain after urinary diversion2. Surveillance of upper urinary tract for obstruction3. Surveillance of upper urinary tract for urothelial neoplasia4. Evaluation of the integrity of the intestinal segment or reservoir
  7. 7. • Supine position.• A KUB film is taken to confirm correct positioning, and exposes kidney stones or bladder stones.• A small-gauge catheter is inserted into the ostomy of the loop, advancing it just proximal to the abdominal wall fascia. The balloon can then be inflated to 5 to 10 mL of sterile water.
  8. 8. 1. Evaluation of ureteral stricture disease (anterior)2. Assessment for foreign bodies3. Evaluation of penile or urethral penetrating trauma4. Evaluation of traumatic gross hematuria VCUG is the diagnostic study for anterior urethral stricture
  9. 9. • The patient is usually positioned slightly obliquely (45o) and dependent gip flexed to allow evaluation of the full length of urethra.• A KUB film is taken to confirm correct positioning, and exposes kidney stones or bladder stones.• The penis is placed on slight tension.• A small catheter may be inserted into the fossa navicularis with the balloon inflated to 1 - 2 mL .• Contrast is then introduced via catheter-tipped syringe.• Alternatively, a penile clamp may be used to occlude the urethra around the catheter.
  10. 10. Urethral trauma- urethral stretch ©
  11. 11. Urethral trauma- rupture above pelvic diaphragm ©
  12. 12. Urethral trauma- rupture above pelvic diaphragm ©
  13. 13. Urethral trauma- rupture below pelvic diaphragm ©
  14. 14. Bladder trauma- anterior urethra ©
  15. 15. 1. Evaluation of intravesical pathology2. Evaluation of bladder diverticula3. Evaluation of inguinal hernia involving the bladder4. Evaluation of colovesical or vesico-vaginal fistulae5. Evaluation of bladder or anastomotic integrity after surgical procedure (urine leakage after bladder surgery)6. Evaluation of blunt or penetrating trauma to the bladder
  16. 16. • The patient is usually positioned in supine position• A KUB film is taken to confirm correct positioning, and exposes kidney stones or bladder stones.• The bladder is filled with 200 to 400 mL of contrast depending on bladder size and patient comfort.• Oblique films should be obtained because posterior diverticula or fistulae may be obscured by the full bladder.• A postdrainage film completes the study.
  17. 17. 1. Evaluation of structural and functional bladder outlet obstruction (post. ureth. Strict. and PUV).2. Evaluation of reflux.3. Evaluation of the urethra in males and females. VCUG is the diagnostic study for posterior urethral stricture and PUV
  18. 18. • The patient is usually positioned in supine position• A KUB film is taken to confirm correct positioning, and exposes kidney stones or bladder stones.• Filling film: The bladder is filled with 200 to 400 mL of contrast (for bladder pathology & early reflux).• in ped <12 ys, volume (mL) = (age [years] + 2) × 30 (vary widely based on patient comfort)• Voiding film: (for reflux and urethral abnormalities).• AP and oblique films are obtained.  Oblique films should because posterior diverticula or fistulae may be obscured by the full bladder in addition determination of the grade of reflux (grade I may be hidden in AP film)• Post-drainage (post-void) film: completes the study.

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