2013 brief workshopeec
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2013 brief workshopeec

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2013 brief workshopeec 2013 brief workshopeec Presentation Transcript

  • CREATIVE BRIEFWORKSHOP
  • Wacarra Yeomans Chris BaggottDirector, Creative Services TitleResponsys Compendium@wac_intosh cbaggott@compendium.comwyeomans@responsys.com
  • Agenda• What makes great creative• How to create great content• What makes a great creative brief• How to use a brief to evaluate creative• Tips for giving creative feedback
  • What makes great creative? Your brand Call-to-action The inbox
  • How we read email
  • pop quizHow manypandasdo you see?
  • Example: REI
  • Example: Schwann’sbefore after
  • Example: Comcast before after
  • PersonasJill Brown Behaviors & Culture FearsSingle Working Mom • Slightly unorganized • Feeling unaccomplished • Very practical but easily flustered • Something bad happening • Honest and sincere to her son“There is always something • Passionate • Getting off taskto be done. I need tasks tobe simple and easy so I can Challenges Motivationsfocus on the more important • Managing multiple tasks at once • Checking things off herthings in life, like my son • Coping when “life” happens and “to-do” list goes against her “plan” •Brady.” Quality time with her son • Feeling accomplished Known Information: User Category: New Apartment Tenant Sample Search Queries Needs & Expectations • Apartments in safe • Simplicity Age: 38 neighborhoods • Affordable housing options Race: White • Affordable apartments in • Products and services that are Education: Associate Degree St. Louis easy to understand and choose • How to downsize living space • Anything that is in the best Employment: Full time interest of her son Household Income: $40,000 Family: Divorced, Single mother
  • Customer Engagement CycleStage Questions AskedAwareness How can I find/fix/help __________?Consideration What do I need to consider when purchasing __________?Inquiry What options/solutions does this company offer?Purchase Why is it better to purchase from this company over another?Retention What would make me purchase from this company again?
  • Topic Modeling
  • Topic Modeling
  • Editorial Calendar
  • Customer
  • Customer
  • RepurposedExisting Content Repurpose Existing Content As:News Releases • Rewrite in conversational tone and post on content hubVideo of CEO Annual • Post video on YouTubeMeeting • Convert audio to MP3 for downloadable or streaming podcast • Transcribe speech and post on blogCustomer case studies • Create PowerPoint and post on SlideShare • Record PowerPoint with voiceover as video and post on YouTube • Post video (YouTube embed code) on content hubSelf-published articles • Rewrite in conversational tone and post as a month long blog series • Combine similar articles into an eBook and write a post promoting it’s downloadEvergreen Content • Find content that has performed well before and link to it from a new piece of content or promote it through social
  • FAQ
  • Demonstrating Content Value
  • Why briefs?• Think about briefing as a process and not just a document • What are you trying to achieve? • How does this project fit into your marketing strategy? • How can you ensure all parties are on the same page? – Nail down the strategy before someone even opens photoshop or word – Someone is designing, someone is doing copy, need to break down silos
  • Why briefs?• The Brief is the primary indicator that a goal has become an actual project • A way to document the project goals • A document that can be referenced along the way • There’s a lot of assumptions that someone understands the nuance and detail that you’re not communicating
  • 2 kinds of projects1. Production: Campaigns that use the same framework or template • Briefs can be prescriptive • Sometimes all that is needed is the new image and messaging direction
  • 2 kinds of projects
  • 2 kinds of projects2. AdHoc/New Program: A new program orproject that doesn’t follow an existing template • Absolutely make recommendations and references • Frame the ask as a visual problem to solve
  • Time to sketch• Break into teams• Review your assigned brief• In your group, agree on a sketch or wireframe of how you think this message will look• Be prepared to answer questions 
  • Exercise• What kind of project was this? Production or Adhoc?• Was this brief effective in communicating what you needed to sketch out the campaign?• What was missing?• What was helpful?
  • Briefing a new Adhoc Project Objective Context Direction• How will we • Marketing • Identify the know Strategy problem you success? • Segmentation want solved • Brand • Let your team Guidelines decide the • Reference “how” The Briefing Document
  • ObjectiveWhich of these is more clear?• Drive conversions?• We need to upsell hotels to people who have purchased airlines.• Currently 5% of our customers who purchase flights also purchase hotels. We’d like to see 10% by the end of this campaign.
  • ObjectiveObjectives should include a measurable metric – This clearly outlines expectations for the projects – Objectively enables you to determine if the project was successful – Gives the team a common goal to work toward and guide their decisions.
  • ContextSum up the overarching marketing strategy• How does this project fit into the way we’re talking to our customers in other programs?• Are there materials that have already been created that we should reference?• Do we have previous performance metrics we can refer to?
  • ContextBrand Guidelines – Brand guides are like giving the creative team a map to your organization – Good brand guides should include: • Messaging/Tone • Color palette • Font sizes/weights
  • ContextExamples/Reference – Are there programs that your company has already done that we should refer to? – Do you have an example of a brand who has accomplished your same goal?
  • ContextSegmentation – With the proper marketing information (demographics, etc..) your creative team can craft a message to the appropriate segments.
  • Direction• True direction requires trust – It’s important to identify what problem this project will solve and let your creative team come up with the solution• You can contribute Why and What, but you have to let your team decide how• If you can explain why your subscriber should care, your creative team can tell that story visually
  • 4 Components of a great brief Objective Context Direction• How will we • Marketing • Identify the know Strategy problem you success? • Segmentation want solved • Brand • Let your team Guidelines decide the • Reference “how” The Briefing Document
  • Creative Brief Checklist Dated title of email contact Target Audience  Summary of deliverables required  Audience Profile where appropriate  Count of files  Segmentation and Versioning, where appropriate  Description of files/format Subject Line Direction  Personalization Elements, where appropriate Primary Message Objectives  Objective  Primary content objective: what do we want the  Simple subscriber to do?  Field names and application  Specific outcomes desired, when appropriate  Dynamic  Traffic/Engagement to Online Experience X  Content Segment(s) names and application  Traffic/Engagement to Retail Store Experience X  Field names and application Creative Input  Testing Elements, where appropriate  Summary:  Objective  Primary  Assets required for execution  Secondary, where appropriate  Landing Experience(s):  Tertiary, where appropriate  CTAs required, recommended, prohibited  Promotional, where appropriate  Description of Landing Page requirements expected  Preview, where appropriate from Online team  Social, where appropriate  Product(s) recommendations and/or count  Template considerations, (optional)  Category recommendations and/or count required, recommended, prohibited  Seasonal Landing Page recommendation  Images: (optional) required, recommended, prohibited  Email Specific Landing Page recommendation  Agency-Generated Landing Page  Copy: (optional) required, recommended, prohibited  Creative Direction (aligned with Email  Disclaimers, where appropriate specifics, above + Landing Page requirements from Online Team Recommended Product  Individual product and/or product categories  Analytics Requirements supporting messages
  • Time to sketch• Break into teams• Between yourselves come up with an upcoming project that needs a brief• What’s your objective?• What context would you need to provide?• How would you write direction for your team?• Be sure to keep the brief you write
  • 4 Components of a great brief Objective Context Direction• How will we • Marketing • Identify the measure Strategy problem you success? • Segmentation want solved • Brand • Let your team Guidelines decide the • Reference “how” The Briefing Document
  • Creative Brief Checklist Dated title of email contact Target Audience  Summary of deliverables required  Audience Profile where appropriate  Count of files  Segmentation and Versioning, where appropriate  Description of files/format Subject Line Direction  Personalization Elements, where appropriate Primary Message Objectives  Objective  Primary content objective: what do we want the  Simple subscriber to do?  Field names and application  Specific outcomes desired, when appropriate  Dynamic  Traffic/Engagement to Online Experience X  Content Segment(s) names and application  Traffic/Engagement to Retail Store Experience X  Field names and application Creative Input  Testing Elements, where appropriate  Summary:  Objective  Primary  Assets required for execution  Secondary, where appropriate  Landing Experience(s):  Tertiary, where appropriate  CTAs required, recommended, prohibited  Promotional, where appropriate  Description of Landing Page requirements expected  Preview, where appropriate from Online team  Social, where appropriate  Product(s) recommendations and/or count  Template considerations, (optional) required,  Category recommendations and/or count recommended, prohibited  Seasonal Landing Page recommendation  Images: (optional) required, recommended, prohibited  Email Specific Landing Page recommendation  Agency-Generated Landing Page  Copy: (optional) required, recommended, prohibited  Creative Direction (aligned with Email specifics,  Disclaimers, where appropriate above + Landing Page requirements from Online Team Recommended Product  Individual product and/or product categories  Analytics Requirements supporting messages
  • Tips for evaluating creative Objective Context Direction• Will the creative • Does this solution • Does it fit your solutions lead to make sense with “what” and “when” us meeting our the rest of my criteria? goal? consumer • Is there a solution communications? to the problem we identified?
  • Tips for evaluating creativeUse the 7 principles of user experience• Hierarchy• Utility• Usability• Aesthetics• Identification• Stimulation• Value
  • 7 principles of user experienceHierarchy• Is the first element I see the most important part of the message?
  • 7 principles of user experienceUtility• Is this the right channel or delivery method for this message?
  • 7 principles of user experienceUsability• Does this email function like I would expect?
  • 7 principles of user experienceAesthetics• Does this represent our brand?
  • 7 principles of user experienceIdentification• Can I identify myself with the product or message? Does it fit into my daily activities?
  • 7 principles of user experienceStimulation• Does the message give me inspiration? Or wow experiences?
  • 7 principles of user experienceValue• What’s in it for me?
  • HIERARCHYOn a scale of 1-10,is the first element I see,the most important one?
  • UTILITYOn a scale of 1-10,is this the rightchannel or deliverymethod for thismessage?
  • USABILITYOn a scale of 1-10, does this email function like I would expect?
  • AESTHETICSOn a scale of 1-10,does this represent ourbrand?
  • IDENTIFICATIONOn a scale of 1-10,can I identify myself withthe product or message?Does it fit into my dailyactivities?
  • STIMULATIONOn a scale of 1-10,Does the message giveme inspiration? Or wowexperiences?
  • VALUEOn a scale of 1-10,what’s in it for me?
  • Critique•Hierarchy•Utility•Usability•Aesthetics•Identification•Stimulation•Value
  • Critique•Hierarchy•Utility•Usability•Aesthetics•Identification•Stimulation•Value
  • Critique•Hierarchy•Utility•Usability•Aesthetics•Identification•Stimulation•Value
  • Giving Feedback: Copy & Design• Assume every word, punctuation mark, color, font and pixel are there for a reason before giving direction• Let the team explain creative decisions• The writer and designer are counting on you to make sure the work meets business objectives• Try to differentiate client direction from your personal preferences (Both are valid! But in different ways)• Ask questions and make suggestions, so the writer and designer have a choice and trust your team• Be specific about what isn’t working• If there are more than a couple stickies or emails, TALK 
  • Giving Feedback: Copy• It looks easy, but it’s not • Give direction rather than rewriting• Ask questions about word choice• Keep the editing within the copy discipline – When typos happen, it’s a reflection on the writer• Include examples so the writer can easily understand what you’re looking for
  • Giving Feedback: Design• At first glance, what are you immediately drawn to? – In two seconds can you tell what this email is about? – Do you look at the primary message first? – Is a secondary message bolder and carrying more visual weight?• Be specific about what isn’t working• Keep the end user in mind – How will a subscriber interact with this message?• Decide whether your responses are personal preference or business objectives
  • Do’s and Don’tsDON’Ts• Say “I don’t like that”• Stand over someone while they make changes, unless you are invitedDO’s• Keep the objective in mind – is this meeting the objective?• Think about your word choice when giving feedback• Be specific about what you’re looking for
  • Feedback•Hierarchy•Utility•Usability•Aesthetics•Identification•Stimulation•Value
  • Feedback•Hierarchy•Utility•Usability•Aesthetics•Identification•Stimulation•Value
  • Feedback•Hierarchy•Utility•Usability•Aesthetics•Identification•Stimulation•Value
  • Exercise!• Find your team’s original brief• Share it with the team next to you• As a group, you have 7 minutes to come up with a wireframe for the project
  • Exercise!• Now use the 7 principles of user experience to evaluate the wireframes
  • Exercise!• For our final exercise, let’s practice giving feedback!
  • Thanks!Wacarra Yeomans Chris BaggottDirector, Creative Services TitleResponsys Compendium@wac_intosh cbaggott@compendium.comwyeomans@responsys.com