119. dissertation impacts of lean supply chain customs in china
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    119. dissertation impacts of lean supply chain customs in china 119. dissertation impacts of lean supply chain customs in china Document Transcript

    • 1 Dissertation Impacts of lean supply chain customs in China Table of Content List of Tables 4 List of Figures6 Table of Content ..................................................................................................................................2 Chapter 1. Introduction..................................................................................................................4 1.1 Research motivation.....................................................................................................6 1.2 Research aim and objectives........................................................................................9 1.3 Research Structure .......................................................................................................9 Chapter 2. Literature Review.......................................................................................................10 2.1 Lean Concepts ...........................................................................................................10 2.1.1 Definition of Value, Waste, and Quality ....................................................................10 2.1.2 Lean Practice versus Lean Thinking...........................................................................13 2.1.3 Lean Design.................................................................................................................14
    • 2.1.4 Level of cooperation in the supply chain, and lean production adoption ....................17 2.1.5 Lean Supply Chain Management................................................................................20 2.1.6 Other Components of Lean Management ...................................................................23 2.2 Negative Impacts / Drawbacks of Lean Management..............................................29 Chapter 3. Research Methodology ..............................................................................................33 3.1 Research Philosophy..................................................................................................33 3.2 Research Strategy.......................................................................................................34 3.3 Research Methods......................................................................................................38 3.4 Research Design.........................................................................................................40 3.5 Data collection ...........................................................................................................42 3.5.1 Questionnaire Design...................................................................................................43 3.5.2 Questionnaire Translation............................................................................................44 3.5.3 Data Collection and Nonresponse Bias........................................................................44 3.6 Validity and Reliability..............................................................................................46 Chapter 4. Results and Discussion ..............................................................................................48 4.1 Profiles of Respondents .............................................................................................48 4.2 Assessing Reliability and Validity.............................................................................53 4.3 Data Analysis.............................................................................................................55 4.3.1 The Taxonomy of Supply Chain Strategies.................................................................55 4.3.2 Product Characteristics and Supply Chain Strategies..................................................58 4.3.3 Influence of Supply Chain Tactic on Implementation.................................................59 Chapter 5. Conclusion and Recommendation .............................................................................61 5.1 Conclusion .................................................................................................................61 5.2 Recommendation for further research .......................................................................63 Reference 65
    • 3 Abstract This study is aim to investigate the performance of lean supply chain management adopted in Chinese enterprises as well as to examine the correlation between firm lean supply chain strategy and the creation of competitiveness. The data is collected from several Chinese firms in manufacture industry in regards of their statistical information related to supply chain management, lean production, product characteristic and competitive performance. The result is observed showing that the concept of lean management is generalized to be more dynamic in China, particularly a number of firms have applied successful lean production into their strategy. Moreover, the study also reveals that lean strategies are in association with the firm competitive position through various innovative product characteristics. The results support the product characteristic/lean supply chain strategy.
    • List of Tables Table 4-1 Industry distribution of respondents and population ..........................................43 Table 4-2 Respondent profile..............................................................................................44 Table 4-3 Company profile.................................................................................................45 Table 4-4 Analysis of variance of supply chain strategies..................................................51 Table 4-5 Analysis of variance for control variables versus supply chain strategy............52 Table 4-6 The assessment of discrepancy of cargo features by supply chain tactic...........54 Table 4-7 The assessment of dissimilarity in performance of finance and operation by using supply chain tactic..........................................................................................................55
    • 5 List of Figures Figure 3-1An outline of the main steps of the qualitative research ....................................37 Figure 3-2Research design..................................................................................................38 Chapter 1. Introduction 1.1 Research motivation There has been a tremendous progress over the past century in the innovations and growths in the achievement of a higher extent of elasticity and client responsiveness, with the start since the industrial revolution in the 18th century. Yet, there has been the redundant product so-called waste causing from the extreme growths. As per Kundu et al. (2011), the definition of wastes stands for any action which creates no worth within the resources conversion (which is chiefly from raw materials) into a goods/service as per client’s request. Lean application is viewed to be among the reasonable resolutions which are getting the adoption by a lot of areas all over the world to speak to the matters of waste. Researchers have made report of various kinds of waste with the identification: loss created by overproducing, waiting time loss, delivery loss, processing loss, inventory loss, motion loss, and loss from goods defects (Ōno, 1988; Oguchi et al., 2006; Stehlík, 2009; Elezi et al., 2010; Abdel-Wahab et al., 2011). As a result, the producers could achieve great standard and less expensive expenditures in the processing line via the removal of barriers and obstacles from the scheme. Main beliefs of lean thinking have got a broad acceptance from a lot of producing implementations and a successful application across a lot of rules. Whist a lot of investigators have done research regarding lean, a few investigations on lean have been
    • implemented in China (Hofer et al., 2011; Taj and Morosan, 2011). The research of Hofer et al. (2011) was made up with a concentration on examining the application of lean producing in the electrical and electronics field via viewing at different matters for example its comprehension among the responsive firms, its advantages and disadvantages, the equipments and tactics utilized. Lean excellence is defined to be a corresponding feedback to current extremely competitive surrounding. Due to the broad fame of the triumph of lean, it is getting the adoption by a lot of fields and is expanding to a lot of other fields of the value chain. Fascinatingly, beginning the perspectives from lean producing, just grew supply chain hypothesises and schemes often receives examination related to leanness. Increasingly, companies are confronting a revolution in which lean principles has got the application to logistics and supply chain management. Papadopoulou and Ozbayrak (2005) have declared that in a lot of circumstances leanness acts as the landmark hypothesis with which evaluations are being driven between the second and newly leading tactics. There was further argument that in an association, supply chain makes the encompass of every side of the schemes yet the upgrading of flawless working schemes is undeniably high however a lot of firms can reduce the whole loss from the scheme to make sure of flawless and efficient implementation (Azevedo et al., 2012). Additionally, losses are made up owing to the inappropriate stream of resources, data and funds inside the supply chain. For instance, if the providers of a producer are providing just wholesales and if there happens to be longer lead times, it is such a waste of time for the producer. There are other instances for example: Baum and Luria (2010) gave the comment that nearly $250 to $400 billion are lost per year just in North American fields owing to ineffectiveness in the supply chains. There was the estimation that this sum could become $1 trillion all over the world. Parfitt et al. (20120); Perez et al. (2010); Ji (2012) made the
    • 7 identification that several of the losses (i.e., matters and concerns) regarding food and pork supply chains and made the classification of them into losses in relation with goods currents, losses in relation with information and loses in relation with managing and controlling. Kristal et al. (2010) made a detailed study of the connection between waste cut and supply chain tactics and made the argument that the competitive advantage of a supply chain can be seen as a continual procedure of accomplishing management over various kinds of loss. Plenert (2010) distinguished conventional lean with lean supply chain. As per their view, the concentration of conventional lean is to deliver value to the client. The main instrument for progress is to remove loss from the association procedures with clients in mind. On the contrary, the lean supply chain perspective is established on the wider target of offering value to the client via the optimization of the implementation of the supply chain as a scheme. A characteristic lean supply chain is the involvement of upgrading the whole upstream and downstream actions into a logical entire and just some papers which directed the perspective of the application of lean producing tactics to the entire of supply chain are accessible. More simply, the definition of lean supply chain can be as an applying of lean producing tactics to supply chain to upgrade the actions of the whole shareholders concerned in the supply chain net and offer value to the clients via the elimination of losses. The target of this investigation, thus, is investigating the degree of lean supply chain performances chain for the invention of a competitive supply chain in China where the lean supply chain will be among the best method in trading performances to supply chain implementation. Arlbjørn et al. (2011) assisted that lean supply chain is creating the values and chance of trade procedure progress and steadiness. Primarily, simultaneously it will be offering ongoing productivity to the trading surrounding in China.
    • 1.2 Research aim and objectives The targets of the investigation are as below:  For the investigation of the degree of performance for lean supply chain customs and the impacts of lean supply chain customs on the implementation of the lean in China.  For the identification of the essential connections between lean implementations and the invention of a competitive supply chain in China.  For the examination if lean implementation intervene the connections between lean supply chain performances and with lean supply chain implementation in China. 1.3 Research Structure So as to accomplish the investigation targets, the dissertation is with below structure:  Chapter 1: Introduction: This chapter shows the presentation of an outlook of investigation, targets, tactics, aims and range, pragmatic meaning and organization of the investigation report. To summarize, there is the presentation of foundation, targets, the method of conducting and advantages of the investigation.  Chapter 2: Literature Review: In this chapter, there is the presentation of hypothesises in relation with competitive advantages, supply chain management and lean perspective.  Chapter 3: Research Methodology: In this chapter, there is the presentation of investigation conducting tactics, the adjustment and test of scale, the establishment of model, new theories and the method of building instance.
    • 9  Chapter 4: Results and Discussion: There is the analysis of the statistics, giving the presentation of assessments to examine model and theories.  Chapter 5: Conclusions and Recommendation: There is the discussion and review of the outcomes of the investigation; an amount of suggestions are proposed for the development of an efficient and competitive supply chain management to enhance competitive status of companies. This document is provided by: VU Thuy Dung (Ms.) Manager Center for Online Writing Resources Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/vu.thuydung.5076 Email : assignmentsource@gmail.com Blogger : http://assignmentsource.blogspot.com/ Website : http://assignmentsource.com/
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