Teachers' Digital Competence and Participation in teacher networks (ED-Media symposium)

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Presentation from the ED-Media symposium "Teachers’ Role in the SNS-Era". Abstract: …

Presentation from the ED-Media symposium "Teachers’ Role in the SNS-Era". Abstract:
Teacher networks, i.e. communities to share and co-construct professional knowledge, are touted to be important for teachers’ continuous professional development. Especially social networks and online communities can offer opportunities anywhere, anytime and at a relatively low cost as compared to on-site training. In this paper we present a concept for comparing a set of teachers’ digital competence frameworks at international and national level with a specific focus on indicators for participation and activities in teacher networks. Furthermore, using data from Survey of Schools: ICT in education we present national differences regarding participation in teacher networks and reflect it through some national programmes focusing on teachers' digital competence building. The final aim of the paper is to reflect how teachers' participation and activities in teacher networks could better be studied as part of digital competence with a final aim to support the European level policy actions as outlined in the newly launched Communication on Opening Up Education by the European Union.

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  • 1. Teachers' Digital Competence and Participation in teacher networks ED-Media, June 24 2014 Riina Vuorikari Barbara Neža Brečko Teachers’ Role in the SNS-Era (ED-Media 2014 Symposium)
  • 2. European Commission, Joint Research Centre European Commission's in-house science service Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS) Research institute supporting EU policy-making on socio-economic, scientific and/or technological issues
  • 3. ICT for Learning and Skills http://essie.eun.org/ • >50 publications on IPTS eLearning website • Principal client: DG Education & Culture Policy • 2013 COM on Opening up Education; E&T 2020; Digital Agenda; New skills and Jobs; EU Recommendation on Key Competences for LLL,… What: • ICT for modernising and innovating Education & Training (E&T) in Europe • 21st century skills for digital economy and society Why: • Existing evidence is fragmented and not addressing the EU • ICT for learning and skills evolves fast • Tackle MS differences in ICT use in E&T • Europe is not a top performer in Education (E.g. PISA) Research strands • Opening up Education, OER & Science 2.0 • Innovating Learning and Teaching • Key Competences and 21st century skills
  • 4. Structure I. Context of this work II. Digital Competence Framework (DIGCOMP) III. Focus: Current work on teacher digital competence and teacher networks IV. Next steps and Discussion
  • 5. Teacher networks are online and/or offline professional collaboration communities to share and co-construct professional knowledge, e.g. Teachers Lifelong Learning networks EU-funded project (2009- 2012) www.tellnet.eun.org IPTS was responsible for scenarios of teaching profession in 2025
  • 6. JRC IPTS study on Digital Competence for DG EAC A3 (2010-2012) http://is.jrc.ec.europa.eu/pages/EAP/DIGCOMP.html
  • 7. Structure I. Context of this work II. Digital Competence Framework (DIGCOMP) III. Focus: Current work on teacher digital competence and teacher networks IV. Next steps and Discussion
  • 8. Digital Competence framework (DIGCOMP) Competence areas 1. Information 2. Communication 3. Content creation 4. Safety 5. Problem solving
  • 9. JRC IPTS study on Digital Competence for DG EAC A3 (2010-2012) Competence areas 21 Competences 1. Information 1.1 Browsing, searching, & filtering information 1.2 Evaluating Information 1.3 Storing and retrieving information 2. Communication 2.1 Interacting through technologies 2.2 Sharing information and content 2.3 Engaging in online citizenship 2.4 Collaborating through digital channels 2.5 Netiquette 2.6 Managing digital identity 3. Content creation 3.1 Developing content 3.2 Integrating and re-elaborating 3.3 Copyright and Licences 3.4 Programming 4. Safety 4.1 Protecting devices 4.2 Protecting data and digital identity 4.3 Protecting health 4.4 Protecting the environment 5. Problem solving 5.1 Solving technical problems 5.2 Expressing needs & identifying technological responses 5.3 Innovating, creating and solving using digital tools 5.4 Identifying digital competence gaps http://is.jrc.ec.europa.eu/pages/EAP/DIGCOMP.html
  • 10. What does it mean to be digitally competent? KNOWLEDGE SKILLSATTITUDES COMPETENCE Digital competence ≠ use of ICT tools Digital competence involves the confident and critical use of ICT for employment, learning, self- development and participation in society (EC, 2006).
  • 11. Source: Elaborated by IPTS, based on the structure of the eCompetence framework for ICT professionals
  • 12. Structure I. Context of this work II. Digital Competence Framework (DIGCOMP) III. Focus: Current work on teacher digital competence and teacher networks IV. Next steps and Discussion
  • 13. Previous work on teacher competence descriptions* • In the EU, in general, they mirror concerns with the development of the 8 European key competences for LLL • Digital competence is one of the 8 key competences • They highlight the relevance of collaborative, research and reflective competences in teachers as adaptive experts and lifelong learners. * European Commission (2012). Commission Staff Working Document: Supporting the Teaching Professions for Better Learning Outcomes Accompanying the document Communication from the Commission Rethinking Education: Investing in skills for better socio-economic outcomes
  • 14. Our current work on teacher digital competence In this paper, we • looked at 2 examples of teacher digital competence frameworks (UNESCO and Slovenian e-competency) • focused on how they describe teachers' professsional collaboration in teacher networks (focus on PD) • mapped the 2 example frameworks into DIGCOMP framework
  • 15. OUTCOMES of 2 examples of teacher digital competence frameworks mapped to DIGCOMP framework Competence areas 21 Competences 1. Information 1.1 Browsing, searching, & filtering information 1.2 Evaluating Information 1.3 Storing and retrieving information 2. Communication 2.1 Interacting through technologies 2.2 Sharing information and content 2.3 Engaging in online citizenship 2.4 Collaborating through digital channels 2.5 Netiquette 2.6 Managing digital identity 3. Content creation 3.1 Developing content 3.2 Integrating and re-elaborating 3.3 Copyright and Licences 3.4 Programming 4. Safety 4.1 Protecting devices 4.2 Protecting data and digital identity 4.3 Protecting health 4.4 Protecting the environment 5. Problem solving 5.1 Solving technical problems 5.2 Expressing needs & identifying technological responses 5.3 Innovating, creating and solving using digital tools 5.4 Identifying digital competence gaps
  • 16. And what does it all mean (1)..? The example frameworks seem to value teacher collaboration as such • but mostly for PD reasons (not so much as a teaching competence) • A gap identified: when competence frameworks talked about the use of SNS to facilitate teacher networking, not all competences needed are equally covered, e.g. issues related to other symposium papers • netiquette with students/ parents; • managing digital identity as a teacher vs. private life
  • 17. And what does it all mean (2)..? Current empirical studies (e.g. Survey of schools: ICT .., TALIS) • offer too little data to study teachers' digital competence building and the role of teacher network (and SNS) within • do not cover all the competence areas equally • E.g. TALIS 2014 has very few questions related to the use of ICT for education or PD
  • 18. Structure I. Context of this work II. Digital Competence Framework (DIGCOMP) III. Focus: Current work on teacher digital competence and teacher networks IV. Next steps
  • 19. JRC-IPTS future work in this area 1. The DIGCOMP framework will be referenced with the European Qualification Framework (EQF) • Each DIGCOMP competence will be referenced using the main three reference level descriptors (knowledge, skills, competence) on 8 levels. Descriptors will indicate the learning outcomes relevant to each level in any system of qualifications. • Work most likely finished by mid-2015 2. Creation of Teachers' Digital Competence Framework using the EQF levels • Work will be carried out in 2014- 2015
  • 20. Thank you! Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS) Information Society Unit http://is.jrc.ec.europa.eu JRC Science Hub: https://ec.europa.eu/jrc