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Safely Back to School Draft 8 2 11
&quot;Holy (blank). Holy (blank). This is terrifying.&quot;  <ul><li>Declan Sullivan tweeted his last words while winds ra...
Brilliant Yale student pulled into lathe <ul><li>In a  New York Times  article, Michele Dufault was described as a student...
World-renowned bird tracker struck by freight train <ul><li>Even the most carefree occupations become life-threatening whe...
<ul><li>These students were cut down in their prime. Sadly, the deaths of these bright students were all preventable. Stud...
Accidents and Fatalities <ul><li>OSHA investigated 551 accidents in SIC 82, which is a category that covers educational in...
Injury Prevention Basics <ul><li>With the following resources and tools at hand, worker and student accidents and fataliti...
Some basic  OSHA rules to remember <ul><li>Each employee in the recognition and avoidance or unsafe conditions, standards,...
PPE – Not another acronym! <ul><li>Don’t worry, we’ll fill you in on this one </li></ul><ul><li>PPE – personal protective ...
Construction worker plummets 100 feet to his death Working from heights <ul><li>26-year-old Zachary John Wilson was doing ...
General rules when working from heights <ul><li>If working on a cherry picker, aerial lift, or platform suspended in the a...
Prevalence of scaffolding deaths in education <ul><li>According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, 72% of all scaffold...
Extreme heat and weather <ul><li>Working in extreme weather </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Students and workers walk from administr...
Heat factors in the  death of a Dallas coach <ul><li>The National Weather Service said temperatures in the Dallas area top...
Ways to beat the heat <ul><li>If you’re an agriculture professor or a football coach, sometimes there’s no choice but to w...
The Dept. of Labor makes monitoring weather easier with its latest app <ul><li>We live in a fast-paced world, and not ever...
Prepare for snow and ice removal <ul><li>When a snowstorm blankets campus in a dangerous coat of ice and snow, every worke...
Also, someone has to clear the snow <ul><li>While many of us stay indoors during the blizzard, others work because of the ...
Basic tips to prevent the cold chill you to the bone <ul><li>Driving tips for workers who operate vehicles </li></ul><ul><...
Hazardous equipment and chemicals in labs, workshops and other areas
Working with chemicals <ul><li>Those who wish to pursue the sciences will work in labs with an array of substances and che...
Some basics on working with machinery <ul><li>In the case of Michele Dufault’s death, OSHA “told Yale the lathe lacked req...
Sitting: a subtle killer <ul><li>Many jobs and positions at schools involve sitting at a desk for hours on end. </li></ul>...
How to sit or stand at the desk <ul><li>There are several simple ways to improve employee health and at the same time prod...
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  • The accident happened October 20, 2010 Photo Joe Reynolds AP Authorities were investigating the incident. The hydraulic scissor lift, which can be lowered or raised depending on needs, stretched across a nearby street. According to one report, the tower stood about 50 feet above the ground. Winds in the area were gusting to 51 mph at the time, according to the National Weather Service, and the team practiced indoors Tuesday because of the blustery conditions. Sullivan indicated via his Twitter account that he was in a dangerous predicament. According to a report from WTSB in South Bend, Sullivan posted the following tweet at 3:22 p.m. ET, just as practice was beginning: &amp;quot;Gusts of wind up to 60 mph. Well today will be fun at work. I guess I&apos;ve lived long enough.&amp;quot; Then, at 4:06 p.m. according to the station, Sullivan posted another tweet: &amp;quot;Holy (blank). Holy (blank). This is terrifying.“ http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/news/story?id=5734494 http://newsinfo.nd.edu/news/17292-homily-for-declan-sullivan/
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/14/nyregion/yale-student-dies-in-machine-shop-accident.html April 13, 2011 Yale Student Killed as Hair Gets Caught in Lathe By LISA W. FODERARO As a Yale undergraduate majoring in astronomy and physics, Michele Dufault was used to extreme physical environments. She worked on underwater robotic vehicles last summer as a fellow at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. She also traveled to Houston as part of a team of undergraduates chosen by NASA to perform a plasma physics experiment in reduced gravity. But it was a rudimentary machine — a lathe in a campus laboratory — that erased what everyone imagined to be a brilliant future for Ms. Dufault, who also found time to mentor girls interested in science and to play saxophone in Yale’s precision marching band. On Tuesday, just weeks from graduating, she toiled late at night inside a machine shop in a chemistry lab, as she had for weeks while working on her senior thesis: investigating the possible use of liquid helium for detecting dark matter particles. Ms. Dufault, 22, was killed when her hair became caught in the lathe, whose rotating axis is used to hold materials like wood or metal being shaped. Students and staff members were overwhelmed by the news on Wednesday, and met in small groups to share their grief. Linda Koch Lorimer, a Yale vice president and its secretary, called the death a “terrible accident” in a letter to students, and said counselors were available. A candlelight vigil was held Wednesday night in the courtyard of Saybrook College, the residential complex where Ms. Dufault lived on the New Haven campus. “ She was incredibly passionate about every sort of science,” said Joe O’Rourke, a fellow astronomy and physics major and member of the physics team. “She was the hardest-working person I know.” Connecticut’s chief medical examiner ruled the death an accident, citing the cause as asphyxia due to neck compression. The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration said it would investigate; Ted Fitzgerald, a spokesman for OSHA in Boston, said the agency had jurisdiction over the lab because Yale employees also use its equipment. Yale’s president, Richard C. Levin , said in a statement that the university would also review “the safety policies and practices of laboratories, machine shops and other facilities with power equipment” operated by undergraduates, in both science and arts buildings. Until the review is complete, he said, undergraduates will have access to those places only during set hours, and monitors will be present. Mr. O’Rourke said the machine shop in Sterling Chemistry Laboratory, which he also uses, always had a staff member present during daytime hours. But many students use the shop at night; Dr. Levin said that other students who were working in the building found Ms. Dufault’s body and called the police. The chemistry department’s Web site says access to the machine shop is “strictly limited” to those who have completed an introductory shop course. Yale lists safety precautions online for another machine shop on campus, warning students: “If you have long hair or a long beard, tie it up — If your hair is caught in spinning machinery, it will be pulled out if you are lucky.” Ms. Dufault was taking an advanced course on machine shop protocols this semester, Mr. O’Rourke said. And for the NASA reduced-gravity experiment, she helped write a 60-page document on safeguards. “ She’s always been very careful,” he said. “That’s why I was shocked that this happened. I worked with her in that lab and always saw her taking the safety precautions.” Manfred Philipp, a chemistry professor at Lehman College in the Bronx, who had no direct knowledge of the Yale accident, said lathes and similar equipment were notoriously hazardous. “ You have to be really careful around a machine like this because it has immense power,” he said. “The lathe has revolving moving parts, and if your hair gets stuck in that, then your head would be pulled toward the machine.” Ms. Dufault, who grew up in Scituate, Mass., had planned to pursue a graduate degree in ocean science. At the Noble and Greenough School in nearby Dedham, she was remembered as “one of the most precocious students whom her teachers ever encountered.” “ Her mind, her sense of curiosity, her perceptiveness, her sensitivity and her enjoyment of what she did were extraordinary,” said Robert P. Henderson Jr., the head of school. “She was a true intellectual.” This article has been revised to reflect the following correction: Correction: April 16, 2011 An article on Thursday about a Yale student who was killed in a lathe accident in a campus laboratory misstated the location of Lehman College, the employer of a professor who was quoted about the danger of lathes. It is in the Bronx, not Queens.
  • http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2010-08-23/news/ct-met-bird-tracker-killed-0824-20100823_1_freight-train-patrick-waldron-train-friday-morning Legendary bird tracker struck by freight train Arlo Raim logged thousands of miles around the world over 35-year career August 23, 2010|By Ted Gregory, Tribune reporter Wiry, bearded and spectacled, Arlo Raim roamed the country with three dogs in his 1991 Saturn station wagon and held near legendary status among bird trackers. &amp;quot;He was one of, if not the best, bird tracker in the world,&amp;quot; said Mike Ward, coordinator of the critical trends assessment program at the Illinois Natural History Survey and one of Raim&apos;s supervisors. &amp;quot;He used radio telemetry to track animals as varied as peregrine falcons, coyotes, turtles and northern cardinals.” That work may have gotten Raim killed. Authorities from the DuPage County Sheriff&apos;s Office and the Canadian National Railway on Monday continued to investigate the death of Raim, who was struck by a train Friday morning in a DuPage County forest preserve near Bartlett. Raim had been in Pratt&apos;s Wayne Woods to monitor the effect of increased train traffic on cardinals, Natural History Survey spokeswoman Libby Johnston said Monday. A southbound Canadian National Railway freight train struck Raim, 67, about 7:30 a.m., CN spokesman Patrick Waldron said. That stretch of track has experienced increased traffic since CN bought the line from the Elgin, Joliet &amp; Eastern Railway in December 2008 for $300 million, Waldron said. He added that Raim was not authorized to be on the tracks, although the railway had hired the Natural History Survey, based at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, to assess the increased train traffic&apos;s impact on birds in the area. A nomadic researcher who rarely spent a night in his Danville home, Raim&apos;s most noteworthy research may have been the 2002 tracking that showed crows changed roosts every two days, a discovery that shed light on why West Nile virus spread so rapidly, Ward said. Longtime colleague and supervisor Bill Cochran noted that Raim also created a breakthrough technique to attach a transmitter to birds by sticking a false eyelash to the bird&apos;s back. Raim, who began working at the Natural History Survey in 1975, logged hundreds of thousands of miles tracking birds in Panama, Mexico, the U.S., Canada and Greenland, colleagues said. Raim also held the dubious distinction of being the subject of the most citizen calls to the Champaign County Sheriff&apos;s Office, Ward said, a consequence of Raim routinely wandering the area at all hours of the day and night while tracking. Raim routinely was courted by entities in Europe and elsewhere with higher salaries, Ward said. But he remained in the Champaign-Urbana area, primarily because he didn&apos;t want to move his dogs — two Dalmatians and a mixed hound he&apos;d obtained from shelters, Ward said. Raim also was passionate about stray animals. Cochran recalled that Raim once recovered babies from an opossum he&apos;d struck with his car and tried nursing the animals with an eyedropper. &amp;quot;He was a bit eccentric,&amp;quot; Ward said, &amp;quot;but a very kind and committed person to nature and to understanding nature.&amp;quot; TribLocal reporter Sheryl DeVore contributed to this report.
  • OHSAS 18001 is an Occupation Health and Safety Assessment Series for health and safety management systems. It is intended to help an organizations to control occupational health and safety risks. It was developed in response to widespread demand for a recognized standard against which to be certified and assessed.
  • http://www.osha.gov/Publications/Const_Res_Man/1926sub-c-overview.htm http://www.ohsas-18001-occupational-health-and-safety.com/
  • http://www.aonesafetyequipment.com/Industrial_safety_helmets_10410.htm http://www.envci.com/faq.html www. osha .gov/Publications/ osha 3151.pdf
  • Man who fell to death at Kansas State identified Posted: wnRenderDate(&apos;Monday, August 1, 2011 5:44 PM EST&apos;, &apos;&apos;, true); Aug 01, 2011 4:44 PM Monday, August 1, 2011 5:44 PM EST Updated: wnRenderDate(&apos;Tuesday, August 2, 2011 2:05 PM EST&apos;, &apos;&apos;, true);Aug 02, 2011 1:05 PM Tuesday, August 2, 2011 2:05 PM EST if (PLATFORM.EventMan) PLATFORM.EventMan.triggerEvent(&apos;WNStoryRelatedBoxdone&apos;); MANHATTAN, Kan. (AP) - A construction worker who died after falling from scaffolding at Kansas State University has been identified as a Council Grove man. Kansas State officials say 26-year-old Zachery John Wilson died Monday while he was doing masonry work at Kansas State&apos;s football stadium. Kansas State said in a news release that the man was working on the east side of Bill Snyder Family Stadium when the scaffolding gave way and he fell 100 feet to the parking lot. Wilson worked for Five Star Masonry, a subcontractor for Konrath Construction Managers, which is building the stadium&apos;s new restrooms. The university says it would be working with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to investigate the accident. Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
  • http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_id=10758&amp;p_table=STANDARDS
  • http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&amp;p_id=9720
  • http://stlouis.cbslocal.com/2011/02/01/mizzou-closed-again-wednesday-for-snow/ http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/08/04/rules-dont-protect-high-school-athletes-from-extreme-heat/
  • http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/sports/hso/7680791.html http://dfw.cbslocal.com/tag/wade-mclain/ http://www.the33tv.com/news/kdaf-prestonwood-football-coach-heat-death-story,0,6812816.story PLANO, TEXAS— The Medical Examiner in Collin County says heart issues associated with heat exposure killed a football coach on the football field at Prestonwood Christian Academy Monday morning. The football equipment stood unused on the field at Prestonwood Christian Academy today. Just a day after the school&apos;s beloved assistant football coach, 55-year-old Wade McLain, passed out during the varsity team&apos;s first practice of the year. &amp;quot;It&apos;s just not right that something like that happened to such good people. There&apos;s so many rotten people walking around in this world and it&apos;s sad to lose the good ones,&amp;quot; said Neighbor Judy McBroom. Neighbor, Judy McBroom, says Coach McLain was a strong family man who always offered to help her with yard work. &amp;quot; I can testify that he was a wonderful person, wonderful family man, wonderful Christian man. He was available when anyone needed help,&amp;quot; said McBroom. Those who knew McLain through Prestonwood had similar things to say. One woman told us Coach McLain was a father figure to her son. &amp;quot;He was always just so supportive to my son who had lost his dad. Just reached out a tried to let him know that he was there and supported him,&amp;quot; said Prestonwood Christian Academy Teacher McKay Minnie. Monday was the first day High School teams across Texas could hit the the gridiron. Temperatures across D-FW spiked at 107 degrees. In Statement to The 33 News, Prestonwood&apos;s pastor said: &amp;quot;I was out there on the field with the coaches and team for a while yesterday and Coach McLain was very active and being himself, having a good time coaching. They had been stopping regularly for water and air-conditioning breaks, and during one break he became ill and collapsed. He was rushed to the hospital, where he passed away.We all realize life is a gift and this is one of those times when someone left unexpectedly,&amp;quot; said Prestonwood Baptsist Church Pastor Jack Graham. The Prestonwood community says Coach McLain leaves behind a strong legacy: a loving wife, five kids, four grand kids and a championship football team. &amp;quot;Very uplifting, just always didn&apos;t look at the negative, always looked at the positive,&amp;quot; said Minnie. While most other high school football teams across North Texas continued with two a days today. The Prestonwood team took the day off. Practice is expected to resume tomorrow.
  • http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=INTERPRETATIONS&amp;p_id=24008 www. osha .gov/OshDoc/data_Hurricane_Facts/ heat _stress.pdf http://new.eletewater.com/worker-safety/
  • http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_index/heat_app.html
  • http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/emergencypreparedness/guides/winterstorms.html
  • http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/emergencypreparedness/guides/winterstorms.html What safety precautions can I take if I must drive in a winter storm? Inspect the vehicle to ensure the following systems are operating properly: Brakes: Brakes should provide even and balanced braking. Also check that brake fluid is at the proper level. Cooling System: Ensure a proper mixture of 50/50 antifreeze and water in the cooling system at the proper level. Electrical System: Check that battery is fully charged and that connections are clean. Check that the alternator belt is in good condition with proper tension. Engine: Inspect all engine systems. Exhaust System: Check exhaust for leaks and that all clamps and hangers are snug. Tires: Check for proper tread depth and no signs of damage or uneven wear. Check for proper tire inflation. Oil: Check that oil is at proper level. Visibility Systems: Inspect all exterior lights, defrosters (windshield and rear window), and wipers. Install winter windshield wipers. Also carry an emergency kit in the vehicle with the following items: Blankets/sleeping bags Cellular telephone or two-way radio Windshield scraper Snow brush Flashlight with fresh/extra batteries Extra winter clothes Shovel Tow chain Matches Traction aids (bag of sand or cat litter) Emergency flares Jumper cables Snacks Water Road maps
  • http://www.emsworld.com/online/article.jsp?siteSection=1&amp;id=17760 http://www.wkow.com/story/15151790/uwpd-responds-to-possible-electrocution-on-uw-campus?clienttype=printable http://media-newswire.com/release_1156861.html
  • http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_General_Facts/hazardouschemicalsinlabs-factsheet.html
  • http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/17/us-yale-osha-idUSTRE77G3OE20110817 MHERST, Mass | Wed Aug 17, 2011 11:22am EDT AMHERST, Mass (Reuters) - Federal safety regulators say Yale University lab equipment responsible for a student&apos;s accidental death this spring lacked some required safety features, a finding that the school disputed on Tuesday. Michele Dufault, a senior from Scituate, Massachusetts, was killed on April 12 in the student machine shop in the Sterling Chemistry Lab when her hair got caught in a lathe as she was working on a project. The Connecticut medical examiner&apos;s office found cause of the accidental death to be asphyxia from neck compression. In a letter dated August 15, the U.S. Department of Labor&apos;s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) told Yale the lathe lacked required safeguards and that the school&apos;s policies and practices for its operation were unsafe. Such missing features could include an emergency shut-off switch as well as a guard or shield to protect a person using the lathe, OSHA spokesman Ted Fitzgerald told Reuters. OSHA claimed these items were critical for safely operating the lathe, which dates from about 1962. Officials found other safety flaws in the shop, including warning signs that were missing and insufficient record keeping, OSHA said. A person operating the lathe alone violates basic safety guidelines, the agency added. But Yale said OHSA&apos;s assessment contained &amp;quot;significant inaccuracies.&amp;quot; &amp;quot;The machine in question met ANSI (American National Standards Institute) standards, which incorporate both training and personal protective equipment for certain types of machines and activities,&amp;quot; a Yale statement said on Tuesday. &amp;quot;Machine tool training provided by Yale was extensive, consistently reinforced by professional staff, and confirmed by Yale&apos;s expert to be exemplary.&amp;quot; Personal protective equipment was provided in the shop and students were told not to use the machines without a &amp;quot;buddy present,&amp;quot; Yale said. The university, which said it was deeply saddened and troubled by the accident, has begun implementing recommendations following a review of its machine shops and equipment, and its policies and practices, with the goal of enhancing safety and accident prevention. Monitors will be present in shops at all times they are in use by undergraduates, Yale said. OSHA did not fine Yale, as it lacks the jurisdiction to do so in cases where students, rather than employees, are affected. Dufault had a double major in astronomy and physics and intended to pursue a career in oceanography following graduation. She also was a saxophonist in the Yale band.
  • Photo: http://www.healthtipsguides.com/archives/most-sitting-can-trigger-chronic-disease/
  • http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/computerworkstations/positions.html http://www.healthtipsguides.com/archives/most-sitting-can-trigger-chronic-disease/
  • Transcript of "University and college safety8 29 11"

    1. 1. Safely Back to School Draft 8 2 11
    2. 2. &quot;Holy (blank). Holy (blank). This is terrifying.&quot; <ul><li>Declan Sullivan tweeted his last words while winds raged and blew the aerial lift, a tower where Sullivan was filming a Notre Dame game </li></ul><ul><li>51-mile-per-hour winds caused the aerial lift to sway in the wind </li></ul><ul><li>There had ample warning of the dangerously windy conditions: a wind alert had been in effect for two days </li></ul><ul><li>The aerial lift toppled, and Sullivan fell 50 feet to the ground </li></ul><ul><li>Declan, age 20, was slated to go off to study in China next semester. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Brilliant Yale student pulled into lathe <ul><li>In a New York Times article, Michele Dufault was described as a student “used to extreme physical environments” </li></ul><ul><li>She worked on underwater robotics and on a team of undergraduate students for NASA </li></ul><ul><li>But one night, while operating a lathe, her hair became caught in the machine </li></ul><ul><li>She was dragged into the machine and died of asphyxiation </li></ul>
    4. 4. World-renowned bird tracker struck by freight train <ul><li>Even the most carefree occupations become life-threatening when in risky environment. </li></ul><ul><li>67-year-old Arlo Raim would travel the country with his three dogs in his 1991 station wagon to track birds; many prestigious European universities courted him, but he said he would never subject his dogs to a move from the University of Illinois. </li></ul><ul><li>Raim was monitoring the effects of increased train traffic on cardinals when a Canadian National Railway freight train struck and killed him. </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>These students were cut down in their prime. Sadly, the deaths of these bright students were all preventable. Students and workers in schools, especially universities and colleges, are subjected to different environments with potential dangers. Only through preventative, cautious measures can students, faculty and other workers safely achieve higher learning and understanding of the world. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Accidents and Fatalities <ul><li>OSHA investigated 551 accidents in SIC 82, which is a category that covers educational institutions from 1/1/2000 to 8/1/2011. </li></ul><ul><li>132 accidents alone have occurred since Jan. 1, 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA conducted 140 fatality investigations from 2000-2010. </li></ul><ul><li>But this previous number is actually much higher </li></ul><ul><ul><li>OSHA does not hold jurisdiction over certain public employees, such as in Alabama, Missouri, Wisconsin and Nebraska. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students killed on campus would not be investigated by OSHA unless there is an employer-employee relationship. Construction workers having accidents would not be included because they are SIC 15-17, a different classification of worker accidents. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Falls and trips, equipment malfunction/misuse and factors from weather are the three most common causes. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Injury Prevention Basics <ul><li>With the following resources and tools at hand, worker and student accidents and fatalities can be significantly avoided </li></ul><ul><li>2100 VPP Companies </li></ul><ul><li>1600 SHARPs </li></ul><ul><li>1910.119 </li></ul><ul><li>ANSI Z9.10 </li></ul><ul><li>States AR, CA, LA, HI, MN, MT NV, NH, NY, OR, WA </li></ul><ul><li>Management leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Employee Participation </li></ul><ul><li>Hazard Prevention and Control </li></ul><ul><li>Education and Training </li></ul><ul><li>Program Evaluation and Improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Communication and coordination on multiemployer sites </li></ul>
    8. 8. Some basic OSHA rules to remember <ul><li>Each employee in the recognition and avoidance or unsafe conditions, standards, to control or eliminate any hazards or other exposure. - 1926.21(b)(2) </li></ul><ul><li>Employees instructed in the hazards, precautions, PPE, emergency equipment. - 1926.21(b)(6) </li></ul><ul><li>Use safety and health programs by OSHA. - 1926.21(b)(1) </li></ul><ul><li>Procedures for escape, accounting, medical, alarms, and training. - 1926.35 </li></ul><ul><li>Following these rules might cost a bit in the short run, but in the long run, you’ll prevent costly lawsuits, OSHA fines, and most importantly, accidents and deaths. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the OSHAS 18001, which is an international management system created by different nations for the benefit of worker safety. The system helps employers identify and control its health and safety risks, reduce the accidents, aid compliance and improve overall performance. </li></ul>
    9. 9. PPE – Not another acronym! <ul><li>Don’t worry, we’ll fill you in on this one </li></ul><ul><li>PPE – personal protective equipment </li></ul><ul><li>It’s a fancy term to describe all the equipment, clothing and other protective devices that workers used to protect themselves </li></ul><ul><li>Judging by the industry in which you work, you’ll have different PPE. But know what PPE you need by visiting the PPE homepage. </li></ul><ul><li>Some examples of PPE: </li></ul>
    10. 10. Construction worker plummets 100 feet to his death Working from heights <ul><li>26-year-old Zachary John Wilson was doing masonry work on Kansas State’s Bill Snyder Family Stadium. </li></ul><ul><li>One of the planks on which he was standing gave way, and he fell 100 feet from the scaffolding to the ground below. </li></ul><ul><li>He died, and an OSHA investigation is ongoing. </li></ul><ul><li>Had he the proper scaffolding equipment to help repair the stadium, he could have lived to see the finished project. </li></ul>
    11. 11. General rules when working from heights <ul><li>If working on a cherry picker, aerial lift, or platform suspended in the air, proper guardrails should be in place - 1926.502(b) </li></ul><ul><li>Body belts and hoists should be used to ensure workers safety from heights; however, do not use these implements to hoist other objects and materials. </li></ul><ul><li>Covers, or the surfaces on which workers stand at high heights, should be able to hold twice the amount of the worker, machinery, and other tools on that surface - 1926.502(i)(2) </li></ul>
    12. 12. Prevalence of scaffolding deaths in education <ul><li>According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, 72% of all scaffolding accidents occur because of planks/support giving way or objects falling and striking workers below. </li></ul><ul><li>OSHA regulation mandates that all scaffolding must be constructed to hold four times its maximum intended load - 1910.28(a)(4) </li></ul><ul><li>Also, OSHA regulation 1910.28(a)(18) requires that employers not subject their workers to scaffolding work during storms or high winds </li></ul><ul><li>Training is essential; only assign students or workers to aerial lifts or scaffolding after they’ve received the proper training </li></ul><ul><li>Heights can be very dangerous, whether you’re a worker on doing masonry work, a videographer filming the game or a spectator watching from the last row in the stadium </li></ul>
    13. 13. Extreme heat and weather <ul><li>Working in extreme weather </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Students and workers walk from administrative building to classroom, across the quad and back to the dorm. But when storms pelt these pedestrians, getting to that 8 o’clock on time becomes not only more miserable, but dangerous. </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Heat factors in the death of a Dallas coach <ul><li>The National Weather Service said temperatures in the Dallas area topped 100 degrees on the Monday assistant coach Wade McLain was to start high school football practice for the year. </li></ul><ul><li>The sweltering heat, as well as a preexisting heart condition, caused McLain to pass out. </li></ul><ul><li>He was rushed to the hospital, but could not be revived. He was 55. </li></ul>&quot;It's just not right that something like that happened to such good people. There's so many rotten people walking around in this world and it's sad to lose the good ones,&quot; said neighbor Judy McBroom.
    15. 15. Ways to beat the heat <ul><li>If you’re an agriculture professor or a football coach, sometimes there’s no choice but to work in the heat. Here’s some ways to keep your work environment safe. </li></ul><ul><li>Train workers for hot temperatures </li></ul><ul><li>Provide plenty of water and breaks for workers to drink the water. Workers should drink 6 ounces, or a medium sized class of water every 15 minutes. And how does a worker tell if he’s hydrated? His or her urine should be clear or lightly colored. If it’s not, drink up. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand symptoms of heat-related illnesses </li></ul><ul><li>Wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothes that cover the entire body </li></ul><ul><li>Let your body acclimate to the heat over a five-day period. On the first day, begin with 50% of the workload. Gradually increase the workload to 100% on the fifth day. </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor weather reports </li></ul>
    16. 16. The Dept. of Labor makes monitoring weather easier with its latest app <ul><li>We live in a fast-paced world, and not every busy employer and employee has the time to listen to Tom Skilling’s entire weathercast. But the Dept. of Labor has made it easier for employers and employees to track heat with a new app. </li></ul><ul><li>The app allows workers and supervisors to calculate the heat index and displays a risk level to outdoor workers. You can get reminders about the protective measures that should be taken at that risk level to protect workers from heat-related illness. </li></ul><ul><li>To download the app, visit the following link: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_index/heat_app.html </li></ul>
    17. 17. Prepare for snow and ice removal <ul><li>When a snowstorm blankets campus in a dangerous coat of ice and snow, every worker, student and visitor is subject to slippery conditions. </li></ul><ul><li>The number one cause of death among educational services sector is trips and falls. Many of these reported cases include icy walkways and unsalted sidewalks. Simple steps can be taken at the workplace and on the way home to avoid nasty falls. </li></ul>
    18. 18. Also, someone has to clear the snow <ul><li>While many of us stay indoors during the blizzard, others work because of the storm. Someone has to clear and salt the sidewalks and roads for pedestrians, workers and other community members. </li></ul><ul><li>The following occupations have to work in snowy, dangerous conditions: utility workers, law enforcement personnel, firefighters, emergency medical personnel, federal, state and local government personnel, military personnel, highway personnel, and sanitation workers. </li></ul><ul><li>70 percent of all injuries during these winter storms are vehicle accidents, while another 25 percent occur because people are trapped outside. </li></ul>
    19. 19. Basic tips to prevent the cold chill you to the bone <ul><li>Driving tips for workers who operate vehicles </li></ul><ul><li>Brakes: Brakes should provide even and balanced braking. Also check that brake fluid is at the proper level. </li></ul><ul><li>Cooling System: Ensure a proper mixture of 50/50 antifreeze and water in the cooling system at the proper level. </li></ul><ul><li>Electrical System: Check that battery is fully charged and that connections are clean. Check that the alternator belt is in good condition with proper tension. </li></ul><ul><li>Engine: Inspect all engine systems. </li></ul><ul><li>Exhaust System: Check exhaust for leaks and that all clamps and hangers are snug. </li></ul><ul><li>Tires: Check for proper tread depth and no signs of damage or uneven wear. Check for proper tire inflation. </li></ul><ul><li>Oil: Check that oil is at proper level. </li></ul><ul><li>Visibility Systems: Inspect all exterior lights, defrosters (windshield and rear window), and wipers. Install winter windshield wipers. </li></ul><ul><li>Quick tips to stay safe </li></ul><ul><li>Wear insulated boots with rubber treads </li></ul><ul><li>Walk with shorter steps and at a slower steps to give you enough reaction time to slippery conditions </li></ul><ul><li>Beware of vehicles that are spinning out of control </li></ul><ul><li>Wear sunglasses - the white snow reflects the sunlight and can blur or blind vision, cause headaches </li></ul><ul><li>Wrap up warmly to prevent frostbite and hypothermia </li></ul><ul><li>Have an emergency kit available in your vehicle in case it breaks down or you become stranded in the snow </li></ul>
    20. 20. Hazardous equipment and chemicals in labs, workshops and other areas
    21. 21. Working with chemicals <ul><li>Those who wish to pursue the sciences will work in labs with an array of substances and chemicals to better understand the world around us. </li></ul><ul><li>But some of these chemicals, when used carelessly or improperly, can be deadly immediately or long-term. </li></ul><ul><li>Wear proper lab coats and eye protection to prevent chemicals from entering through the skin and eyes. </li></ul><ul><li>To ensure your laboratory is safe for faculty and students, conduct a process hazard analysis so that you know the potential dangers. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure the lab has adequate enclosures and ventilation. Without routine checks on these preventative measures, long- and short-term exposure will cause detrimental and even fatal health problems - 1910.134(a)(1) </li></ul><ul><li>For more rules and regulations on lab safety, check out Part 1910.119 of the U.S. Federal Code. </li></ul>
    22. 22. Some basics on working with machinery <ul><li>In the case of Michele Dufault’s death, OSHA “told Yale the lathe lacked required safeguards and that the school's policies and practices for its operation were unsafe.” </li></ul><ul><li>Guarding protects workers from “hazards such as those created by point of operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips and sparks,” and these guards are an obligation of the employer to the worker - 1910.212(a)(1) </li></ul><ul><li>Not only should sufficient guarding be provided for large machines, like the lathe at Yale, but also for other portable power tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Anchor fixed machinery properly so that it does not move during usage, which can be extremely dangerous for the operators and those around the operator- 1910.212(b) </li></ul>
    23. 23. Sitting: a subtle killer <ul><li>Many jobs and positions at schools involve sitting at a desk for hours on end. </li></ul><ul><li>Of the 531 accidents and fatalities that occur in education services, some of them take place at the thought-to-be safe office cubicle. </li></ul><ul><li>Heart disease is the main cause of death in this administrative work spaces. </li></ul><ul><li>Although the exact causes in some worker heart attacks and subsequent deaths are unknown, a career at a desk can cause very adverse health effects. </li></ul><ul><li>Something as simple as office ergonomics can prolong your workers’ lives. </li></ul>
    24. 24. How to sit or stand at the desk <ul><li>There are several simple ways to improve employee health and at the same time productivity. </li></ul><ul><li>Too much sitting can be bad for circulation, and too much typing with bad posture can wreak havoc on the back and cause carpal tunnel syndrome. </li></ul><ul><li>On other hand, too much standing has its adverse effects as well. For more information on jobs that require hours of standing, visit this helpful OSHA link. </li></ul>Positions to sit and stand at your desk <ul><li>Hands, wrists, and forearms are straight, in-line and roughly parallel to the floor. </li></ul><ul><li>Head is level, or bent slightly forward, forward facing, and balanced. Generally it is in-line with the torso. </li></ul><ul><li>Shoulders are relaxed and upper arms hang normally at the side of the body. </li></ul><ul><li>Elbows stay in close to the body and are bent between 90 and 120 degrees. </li></ul><ul><li>Feet are fully supported by the floor or a footrest may be used if the desk height is not adjustable. </li></ul><ul><li>Back is fully supported with appropriate lumbar support when sitting vertical or leaning back slightly. </li></ul><ul><li>Thighs and hips are supported by a well-padded seat and generally parallel to the floor. </li></ul><ul><li>Knees are about the same height as the hips with the feet slightly forward. </li></ul>Consider these posture tips to prevent chronic pain and disease
    25. 25. Thank you page…
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