Primary Teaching Resources – Looking for a solution for Primary APP?
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Primary Teaching Resources – Looking for a solution for Primary APP?

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Take a look at our fantastic new resources to support Primary School Teachers with APP (Assessing Pupils’ Progress). ...

Take a look at our fantastic new resources to support Primary School Teachers with APP (Assessing Pupils’ Progress).

Within this booklet you’ll find some really useful information about APP, about the products available to help support you and some fantastic free samples from the APP for… series.

Why choose APP for…?

• It works with Assessment for Learning (AfL) to help you identify your pupils strengths and weaknesses
• It helps you track your pupils’ progress over time
• Helps you in your curriculum planning and promotes teaching that is matched to your children’s needs.

APP for…is a series of resources created to fully support you with APP in Primary Science, Maths and Reading and Writing. It breaks APP down into smaller, more manageable steps making it simple to carry out, and with prices starting from as little as £30 it’s a really cost effective Primary APP solution.

Find out more about APP for... here www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4

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Primary Teaching Resources – Looking for a solution for Primary APP? Primary Teaching Resources – Looking for a solution for Primary APP? Document Transcript

  • A P P for... Your Solution for Primary A P P FREE sample pages inside!
  • A P P for... What is APP? Assessing Pupils’ Progress (APP) is the structured approach to teacher assessment, designed to help you make judgements on your children’s progress. It equips you with the tools needed to fully understand their needs so that you can tailor your planning and teaching accordingly. The aim of APP is to provide a generalised agreement of pupil progress across the Primary phase to ensure skills progression into KS3. What are the benefits? 3 Works together with Assessment for Learning strategies to help you learn more about your children’s strengths and weaknesses. 3 Helps you track progress over time. 3 Allows you to make judgements about children’s attainment linked to National Curriculum levels. 3 Provides a framework for you to share with children where they are, and what they need to do to make progress. 3 Helps you in your curriculum planning and promotes teaching that is matched to your children’s needs. 3 Helps you to identify gaps in provision or areas that need review. 2 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • So, how can we help you put APP into practice? APP for… is a new series of resources created to fully support you with APP in Primary Science, Maths and Reading & Writing. l Breaks APP down into smaller steps, making it simple and easy to carry out. l Everything you need in one place, providing a complete solution to APP. l Task-based assessments cover all the APP assessment foci. l Cost from as little as £30, making them great value for money. How does APP for… work? Teacher Sheets include an overview of each task, key u Planning concepts covered, and resources needed. There are also suggestions for ways of approaching each task and its outcomes, that can be adapted by you to suit the needs of your class. u Photocopiable pupil sheets put the tasks into a fun and Teaching and Learning motivational context, and prompt children as they complete the task. Teachers’ notes provide advice and support for approaching and delivering each task. u Assessment grids help you to level a child’s work against each Assessment Foci and National Curriculum Level to Assessing see where they are, and what they need to do to move up a level. They can then be used to help you plot a child’s progress and inform your future planning. 3 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • What’s inside this booklet? This booklet is designed to give you a taster of how APP for… will help you to accurately assess your children’s work as part of everyday classroom practice. Inside, you’ll find a complete sample task for Science, Maths and Reading and Writing which include teacher sheets, pupil pages and assessment grids. A P P Year 1 for Reading and Writing Year Year 1 978 0 4350 4140 3 978 0 4350 4150 2 1 Years 1 & 2 £35 £35 978 0 4350 3349 1 Series Editor Deborah Herridge Your solution for APP £30 A P P for Reading and Year 2 Writing Year 2 Year 2 978 0 4350 4141 0 978 0 4350 4151 9 £35 £35 Series Editor Deborah Herridge Your solution for APP A P P for Reading and Years 3 & 4 Year 3 Writing Year 3 Year 3 978 0 4350 3360 6 978 0 4350 4142 7 978 0 4350 4152 6 £30 £35 £35 Series Editor Deborah Herridge Your solution for APP A P P for Reading and Year 4 Writing Year 4 Year 4 978 0 4350 4143 4 978 0 4350 4153 3 £35 £35 Series Editor Deborah Herridge Your solution for APP Years 5 & 6 A P P 978 0 4350 3361 3 for Reading and Year 5 Writing Year 5 Year 5 £30 978 0 4350 4144 1 978 0 4350 4154 0 £35 £35 Series Editor Deborah Herridge Your solution for APP A P P Year 6 Year 6 for Reading and Writing APP for Science can also be bought Year 6 978 0 4350 4145 8 978 0 4350 4155 7 as part of these BBC Active Packs: £35 £35 Series Editor Deborah Herridge Primary Science Your solution for APP Age 7-9 978 1 4066 5666 4 Whole-school Pack Whole-school Pack £160 978 0 4350 4147 2 978 0 4350 4156 4 £200 £199.50 Primary Science Age 9-11 978 1 4066 5669 5 £160 Prices are provisional until publication 4 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • A P P 42 44 AF5 AF4 APP Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and • Forces • Fair test Sample pages from APP practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: Outcomes M01_SCIE_SB_KS2_3613_M01.indd 44 AF4 • Select equipment or information • Select appropriate equipment or • Explain why particular pieces of Key concepts Task overview trapeze in 1859. • Assessing risks sources from those provided to address a information sources to address specific equipment or information sources • Using evidence Using question or idea under investigation e.g. questions or ideas under investigation are appropriate for the questions or Teaching notes investigative QCA: 6e chooses sensible equipment from a e.g. is able to say that a stopwatch ideas under investigation e.g. can • Reliability of results approaches selection which is appropriate to is better than a clock to measure explain that a stopwatch is needed anyone or anything. the task time accurately because it can measure the timing • Repeating measurements M01_SCIE_SB_KS2_3613_M01.indd 42 for Science Years 5 & 6 accurately to 0.1s • Recognise obvious risks when • Identify possible risks to themselves prompted e.g. The bucket could hit and others e.g. If the bucket falls off • Make, and act on, suggestions to someone when it is swinging. the string or it hits anyone, someone control obvious risks, e.g. I will make a related investigations to research? how many swings in a given time)? could get hurt. barrier so that no-one can be hit when the bucket swings. for Science... for Years 5 & 6 AF5 • Identify straightforward patterns in • Provide straightforward explanations • Identify patterns in data presented in science can inform health and safety plans. observations or in data presented in for differences in repeated observations various formats, including line graphs Working critically various formats, including tables, pie or measurements e.g. recognises e.g. recognises that the time taken with evidence and bar charts e.g. recognises that that the three repeat readings are for larger masses to swing is longer changes depending on mass. Consideration of how the larger mass swings slowly unlikely to be exactly the same than that for smaller masses Investigation into how the course of swinging objects because of slight human errors • Suggest improvements to their working • Suggest improvements to their working when carrying out the test Task 12 Trapeze Trouble methods e.g. I think we need to do our methods, giving reasons e.g. We need Task 12 Trapeze Trouble timing more carefully. to always do the swings in the same • Evaluate the effectiveness of their on a string. Discuss which forces are acting on the ‘trapeze’. way, like starting to swing the trapeze working methods, making practical appropriate? How could the reliability of the results be improved? from a definite, marked place. suggestions for improving them e.g. • rulers (masses) Our timing and swinging weren’t very Resources accurate. The same person should • stopwatches swing the trapeze as starts the timer. National Curriculum Programme of Study: Sc1 2e Sc4 2b,c Children should take care that the bucket does not collide with www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 help children to set up the fair test investigation to test a range of masses. • Predict whether different masses in the bucket will affect the swing of the • Discuss how results could be presented e.g. which type of graph would be Can they suggest improvements to their investigation or identify any other Pupil Sheet) and make sure that everyone knows that the flying trapeze is a by ropes. Talk and find out about Jules Léotard who first invented the flying • Task 12 Pupil Sheets • Children prepare a health and safety report for Mr Master, the circus owner. • Set the scene for the task by discussing the dilemma faced by Mr Master (see circus act where the performer performs tricks from a swinging bar suspended • Demonstrate how the trapeze can be modelled using a toy bucket suspended • Keep safe! The bucket should be securely tied to string by an adult. • Ask children to identify hazards and carry out a risk assessment. If necessary, bucket. How could they measure the swing (e.g. the time taken for 10 swings or attached to a toy bucket • objects of different weights Teacher Sheet • 1 metre length of string securely • Health and safety report advising whether Monsieur Muscle should perform on the trapeze. Assessment Sheet © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Science Years 5 and 6 0845 630 22 22 12/3/10 13:07:29 12/3/10 13:07:33 5
  • A P P for Science... for Years 5 & 6 Pupil Sheet Task 12 Trapeze Trouble Disaster! Tina Trapeze has broken her arm and cannot perform her high-flying act. Circus strongman, Monsieur Michel Muscle, wants to replace Tina. Michel is a large man and weighs twice as much as Tina. The circus owner, Mr Master, thinks that the swinging pattern of the trapeze will change and this could be a serious health and safety issue. Can you help Mr Master decide whether Michel should perform on the trapeze? What you need to do • Carry out a risk assessment. What do you need to do to keep safe? • Carry out a fair test to investigate if the trapeze swing changes when different objects of different masses are swinging. • Prepare a health and safety report for Mr Master, which includes your test results. You may find these words helpful forces, push, pull, gravity, air resistance, length, weight, mass, timing, table, graph, recommend © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Science Years 5 and 6 43 Sample pages from APP for Science Years 5 & 6 6 M01_SCIE_SB_KS2_3613_M01.indd 43 12/3/10 13:07:32 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • A P P 44 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: M01_SCIE_SB_KS2_3613_M01.indd 44 AF4 • Select equipment or information • Select appropriate equipment or • Explain why particular pieces of sources from those provided to address a information sources to address specific equipment or information sources Using question or idea under investigation e.g. questions or ideas under investigation are appropriate for the questions or investigative chooses sensible equipment from a e.g. is able to say that a stopwatch ideas under investigation e.g. can approaches selection which is appropriate to is better than a clock to measure explain that a stopwatch is needed the task time accurately because it can measure the timing Sample pages from APP for Science Years 5 & 6 accurately to 0.1s • Recognise obvious risks when • Identify possible risks to themselves prompted e.g. The bucket could hit and others e.g. If the bucket falls off • Make, and act on, suggestions to someone when it is swinging. the string or it hits anyone, someone control obvious risks, e.g. I will make a could get hurt. barrier so that no-one can be hit when the bucket swings. for Science... for Years 5 & 6 AF5 • Identify straightforward patterns in • Provide straightforward explanations • Identify patterns in data presented in observations or in data presented in for differences in repeated observations various formats, including line graphs Working critically various formats, including tables, pie e.g. recognises that the time taken or measurements e.g. recognises with evidence and bar charts e.g. recognises that for larger masses to swing is longerthat the three repeat readings are the larger mass swings slowly than that for smaller masses unlikely to be exactly the same because of slight human errors • Suggest improvements to their working • Suggest improvements to their working when carrying out the test methods e.g. I think we need to do our methods, giving reasons e.g. We need Task 12 Trapeze Trouble timing more carefully. to always do the swings in the same • Evaluate the effectiveness of their way, like starting to swing the trapeze working methods, making practical from a definite, marked place. suggestions for improving them e.g. Our timing and swinging weren’t very accurate. The same person should swing the trapeze as starts the timer. www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 Assessment Sheet © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Science Years 5 and 6 0845 630 22 22 12/3/10 13:07:33 7
  • A P P for Maths... for Year 6 Teacher Sheet Task 26 Spinners Framework objectives Assessment foci • Describe and predict outcomes from data AF1 – Using and applying (reasoning) using the language of chance or likelihood. AF4 – Handling data (processing and • Recognise events that are equally likely. representing data) • Introduce the probability scale of 0 to 1 on a number line. Resources • Pupil Sheet 26.1, one per child Task overview • Paper clips Children make predictions as to the • Pencils likelihood of different events occurring, plotting this on a probability scale. Activity • Ask children to examine the spinners on Pupil Sheet 26.1. First compare A and B, and then C and D, asking in each case which would produce the most odd numbers over a period of 50 trials. • Now compare A and C or B and D. Discuss why these pairs are less straightforward to compare but how that might be done. • Now consider spinner A. What is the chance of getting an even number? Where would this chance be plotted on the probability scale? Repeat for the other three spinners. • Choose one of the spinners and try out the experiment – with 50 spins do you get close to the predicted number of even numbers? Probability of getting an even number: A 0.5; B 0.7; C 0.6; D 0.2. Extension Create spinners that give a 0.1, 0.25, and 0.8 chance of getting an even number. Observe and ask • Which spinner will produce the most even numbers? Why? • How can you compare each spinner? • What would happen if you tried it out 50 times? • Are children able to compare likelihoods for the spinners, including those with different numbers of sections? • Are children able to plot the likelihoods on the probability scale? 56 M01_Math_SB_Year6_1458_M.indd 56 Sample pages from APP for Maths Year5/4/10 6 08:55:24 8 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • A P P for Maths... for Year 6 Sample pages from APP for Maths Year 6 9 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • A P P for Maths... for Year 6 Sample pages from APP for Maths Year 6 10 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • A P P for Reading and Writing... for Year 3 Teacher Sheet Task 5 Flood! Aims of this task Key concepts This task is designed to help you to make Reading judgements about children’s attainment in • retrieve information about background to the Reading AF2 and AF4 (with opportunities for AF1 story and the main events (AF2) and AF5 as well) and Writing AF3, AF5 and AF7 • identify the use of a cliff-hanger as a structural (with opportunities for AF1). The children read and device (AF4) respond to the first two chapters of an adventure • comment on how the writers’ language helps the story written by two eight-year-olds. They write a reader to imagine a scene (AF5) cliff-hanger ending for the next chapter. Writing • plan the next chapter and write a cliff-hanger Related Renewed Framework unit ending for it (AF1, AF3) • use varied sentences for effect (AF5) Narrative Unit 3: Adventure and mystery • write interesting words / phrases that show the passage of time (AF7) Renewed Framework objectives 7.1, 9.1, 9.2, 9.4, 10.1, 11.1 Questions for guided reading Starting off Tell the children they are going to read two chapters from a long story written by two eight-year-olds. As they read it, they should look at how each of the two chapters develops the plot and how the writers help the reader to imagine the sights, sounds and action. Introduce the term ‘cliff-hanger’. The children might be able to give examples from serial television programmes they have watched. Read and respond Read the text (AF1) and then use the following questions to prompt discussion: • What do you find out in Chapter 1? (AF2) • Why did the writers end Chapter 1 with the head telling everyone they are marooned? (AF4) • What are the main events of Chapter 2? (AF2) • Which words and phrases help readers to imagine the scenes in the story? (AF5) Going deeper • What does the first paragraph of Chapter 2 do? (AF4) • What does the second chapter do? (AF4) • Which words and phrases show the passage of time in the story? How are these useful in building up the story? (AF5) Reflect What might happen in Chapter 3? (AF3) © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Reading and Writing: Year 3 47 Sample pages from APP for Reading and Writing Year 3 11 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • 12 A P P 48 Chapter 1: Marooned! Chapter 2: The Worst Lunch Ever There had been waterworks on Earlham Road It was quarter past twelve, lunchtime! Sam for over a month now! sat down and waited for his hot lunch. He It took the children a long time to get waited for five minutes until the Head came home. Steve, Jamie and Sam were sick of it. in and said: “I’m sorry children, there are “I wonder how long this will go on for?” no hot dinners today because the dinner wondered Sam. couldn’t arrive through the flood.” Jamie and Steve wondered too. Everyone sighed, but mostly Sam. “I www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 “It’s probably going to take five weeks,” said wonder what we’re going to eat,” Sam Sam. wondered. The next day the three boys walked to He went to Jamie and Steve and sighed. school together. Suddenly they heard a shout “Can you believe it? No hot lunches!” from near the roadworks: “HELP!” Meanwhile the water was still rising. for Reading and Writing... for Year 3 They saw water pouring out from the Suddenly there was a shout. “Come roadworks. So they ran for their lives all the way quick!” It was Charlotte. to school. The three of them rushed to the door, 0845 630 22 22 They burst through the but they had to wait ten minutes before it classroom door shouting, “FLOOD!” was their turn to go and look at the water. It “Then shut the door!” ordered was rising fast. Steve, Jamie and Sam stood Task 5 Flood! by Jakk and Ranjit, aged 8 Charlotte, and so they did. at the door staring at the glittering, giant The Head walked in and said, puddle of dirty water. Suddenly the water Resource Sheet “I’m sorry children, we are crept through a crack in the door. A shiver © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Reading and Writing: Year 3 marooned for a month.” ran down their spines. They were frightened. Sample pages from APP for Reading and Writing Year 3
  • A P P for Reading and Writing... for Year 3 Reading Response Sheet Task 5 Flood! 1. What do you find out in Chapter 1? 2. Why did the writers end Chapter 1 with the Head telling everyone that they are marooned? 3. What are the main events of Chapter 2? 4. Which words and phrases help readers to imagine the scenes in the story? 5. What does the first paragraph of Chapter 2 do? © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Reading and Writing: Year 3 49 Sample pages from APP for Reading and Writing Year 3 13 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • 14 A P P Main Assessment Focus: AF2 (understand, describe, select or retrieve information, events or ideas from texts and use quotation and reference to texts) 50 Question Exemplified responses Grid reference Notes What do you find out in Recalls some key events: ‘There was a flood; the children ran into school; they shut Level 2 / bullet 1 Chapter 1? the door.’ Recalls main events, characters and setting but with no specific detail: ‘There were Level 3 / bullet 1 roadworks near the school’; ‘Water escaped and there was a flood’; ‘The worker shouted ‘Help’’; ‘The Head said that they were marooned.’ What are the main events Simple response about events: ‘They had lunch and they ran to look at the water that Level 2 / bullet 1 of Chapter 2? came in.’ Identifies main events: ‘It was lunchtime; the flood water was creeping under the Level 3 / bullet 1 door.’ Might start re-telling: ‘Charlotte shouted ‘Come quick!’ and water came under the door.’ Task 5 Flood! Main Assessment Focus: AF4 (identify and comment on the structure and organisation of texts, including grammatical and presentational features at text level) www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 Why did the writers end Personal or literal response: ‘So they could tell their mum or dad’; ‘So they wouldn’t Level 2 this chapter with the Head get wet or drown’; ‘The next chapter says what happened next.’ telling everyone they are marooned? Some awareness of the use of the ‘cliff-hanger’: ‘So you’ll want to read the next Level 3 chapter to see what happens.’ What does the first Awareness of time change, though not explicit: ‘It is lunchtime. The children are Level 2 paragraph of Chapter 2 waiting for their hot dinners.’ do? Identifies it as a time change: ‘It tells us that it is later on. It is now lunchtime.’ Level 3 for Reading and Writing... for Year 3 Other Assessment Focus: AF5 (explain and comment on writers’ use of language, including grammatical and literary features at word and sentence level) Which words help readers Identifies some effective words but with no comment: ‘Burst is a good word’; ‘I like Level 2 / bullet 1 to imagine the scenes in marooned.’ the story? 0845 630 22 22 Identifies basic features of language, with little or no comment: ‘There are some good Level 3 words for “said”, like “shouting”, “ordered” and “sighed”’; ‘”A shiver ran down their spines” shows they were scared.’ Exemplified responses matched to levels of attainment are provided as a guide. As always, professional judgement must be used when assessing pupils’ learning progression and a range of evidence should be gathered for each AF. Reading Responses: Levelling Guidance © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Reading and Writing: Year 3 Sample pages from APP for Reading and Writing Year 3
  • A P P for Reading and Writing... for Year 3 Writing Response Sheet Task 5 Flood! 1. Write some interesting words and phrases that can show the passage of time in a story. 2. Plan the next chapter of the story. Write notes about the main events. Chapter 3 3. Write a cliff-hanger ending for Chapter 3. Use a separate piece of paper or the back of this sheet. REMEMBER! • Use interesting words to show the passage of time. • Use some short and some longer sentences. © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Reading and Writing: Year 3 51 Sample pages from APP for Reading and Writing Year 3 15 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • A P P for Reading and Writing... for Year 3 Writing Responses: Levelling Guidance 1 Task 5 Flood! A pupil response within the range for Level 2 might be: Question 1 (AF7) • Some interesting words and phrases – using those from the text: e.g. a long time, suddenly, a quarter past twelve, five minutes, ten minutes. Question 2 (AF3) • New chapter shows links with the previous one. Characters from the stimulus text appear in the new chapter; there is more about the water coming under the door. Question 3 (AF1, AF3, AF5, AF7) AF1 AF3 Relevant content (e.g. rescuing belongings from Some basic sequencing of ideas: time-related words the flood, getting on to the roof for safety), but and phrases (‘first’, ‘second’, ‘third’, ‘then’). rather repetitive speech (‘get are things’, ‘get are Closing signalled: chapter ends with a character belongings’, ‘get are penceil caseies’, ‘get are school wondering what will happen next. bag’). Apt word choices: ‘belongings’ and, to indicate panic / response to emergency, ‘quic’. AF5 Variation in sentence openings: ‘quic’, ‘I wonder if’, ‘carefully’. Mainly simple sentences. Consistent use of past tense in narration and present tense in speech: ‘So they did that’, ‘Then Charlotte started crying’, ‘Let’s get are school bag’, ‘Why are you crying?’ AF7 Simple, speech-like vocabulary, limited in range: ‘started crying’, ‘I miss my mum and dad’. Some adventurous word choices: ‘quic’, ‘carefully’. 52 © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Reading and Writing: Year 3 Sample pages from APP for Reading and Writing Year 3 16 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • A P P for Reading and Writing... for Year 3 Writing Responses: Levelling Guidance 2 Task 5 Flood! A pupil response within the range for Level 3 might be: Question 1 (AF7) • Simple vocabulary but some words and phrases chosen for effect: e.g. in a flash, at that moment. Question 2 (AF3) • Chapter 3 plan builds on Chapter 2. Some ideas about flood water, what the teacher and children do. Notes indicate some sequencing of events. Question 3 (AF1, AF3, AF5, AF7) AF1 AF3 Some imaginative and appropriate ideas: Ideas sequenced: ‘water started pushing the door elaboration (‘window in their class led up to’, ‘water open’, ‘now the water was up to their knees’. started pushing the door open’). Also sequencing of children’s actions: ‘ran into their classroom corner’, ‘clambered up on top of the chairs and tables…’. Closing signalled: ‘I wonder if the flood will ever go down.’ AF5 Mainly uses simply structured sentences: ‘Suddenly the water started pushing the door open’, ‘Everyone was terrified’. Some complex sentences, some subordination: ‘“What’s happening and how will we get out of here?” said Steve who had just swallowed some of the flooding water.’ Some variation in use of past and present tenses: ‘“Oh dear. I don’t want you getting a cough,” said the teacher.’ AF7 Appropriate vocabulary selected: ‘Everyone was terrified’, ‘Now the water was up to their knees’. Some words selected for effect: ‘too scared to move’, ‘coughed and spluttered’, ‘clambered’. © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Reading and Writing: Year 3 53 Sample pages from APP for Reading and Writing Year 3 17 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • A P P for Reading and Writing... for Year 3 Next Steps for Learning 1 Task 5 Flood! Reading Next steps for developing AF2 To further develop the children’s skills in understanding, describing and retrieving information, events or ideas from texts, you could ask questions such as the following when reading a text together: • Why don’t [character x] and [character y]] get on with one another? • Why wouldn’t [character x] …? Which words tell you this? • What are the key events of this chapter? Point out where each one begins. • Which event changes what happens in the story? This activity should be part of a range of evidence gathered for AF2. Evidence for AF2 can be gathered from other sources, such as: • reading and responding to both fiction and non-fiction texts, in print and other media; • drama activities – e.g. role-play, acting out stories; • note-making for other subjects: e.g. geography, science, history. All tasks in this book provide opportunities to gather evidence for AF2. Next steps for developing AF4 You could develop the children’s understanding of the structure and organisation of stories through discussion points and questions such as: • Why does chapter x end as it does (e.g. cliff-hanger, question, warning)? • Explain the author’s use of chapter headings. • What do the illustrations add to your understanding of the text? • How does the writer set the scene / provide information about characters or what has already happened before the story begins? This activity should be part of a range of evidence gathered for AF4. Evidence for AF4 can also be gathered from other sources, such as: • observations during guided and shared reading of different genres of text; • investigating the organisation of different types of text, especially when text is suited to its purpose: e.g. explanations with diagrams; alphabetically-ordered information, such as a glossary, index or dictionary; on-screen texts. Task 2 on pages 17 to 25, Task 3 on pages 26 to 36, Task 4 on pages 37 to 46 and Task 6 on pages 56 to 64 provide other opportunities to gather evidence for AF4. Writing Next steps for developing AF3 You could develop the children’s understanding of how to organise and present stories through discussion points and activities such as: • Looking at how they began a chapter or paragraph: how it sets the scene for a story or links to a previous chapter or paragraph. • Asking questions about what could happen in the story: e.g. if flood water started coming into the school, what would the children do first? What would the teacher do? What would happen next? • Listing the key events in their or a partner’s story or chapter in the correct order, perhaps as a flow-chart. • Discussing how they ended a chapter or story, and why. What would the reader think or wonder? 54 © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Reading and Writing: Year 3 Sample pages from APP for Reading and Writing Year 3 18 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • A P P for Reading and Writing... for Year 3 Next Steps for Learning 2 Task 5 Flood! Writing (continued) Next steps for developing AF3 This should be part of a range of writing activities from which evidence is gathered for AF3. Evidence for AF3 can also be gathered from: • planning, organising and writing other genres of narrative text; • planning, organising and writing poetry; • planning, organising and writing non-fiction texts. Task 2 on pages 17 to 25, Task 3 on pages 26 to 36, Task 4 on pages 37 to 46 and Task 6 on pages 56 to 64 provide other opportunities to gather evidence for AF3. Next steps for developing AF5 You could develop the children’s skills in writing varying sentences to add interest and create effects in stories through discussion points and activities such as: • Looking at the first words of each sentence and considering whether they are repetitive and whether this is appropriate for the story. • Deciding whether any sentences could be extended, and how. • Considering where any sentences would be better split into shorter sentences: e.g. ‘What’s happening and how will we get out of here?’ or ‘What’s happening? How will we get out?’; • Considering the connective words in their sentences, whether they can be replaced with commas or different words. (See above.) This should be part of a range of writing activities from which evidence is gathered for AF5. Evidence for AF5 can also be gathered from: • sentences the children write in other subjects, to communicate information, ideas or points of view; • writing notes and then expanding them to create sentences; • writing poetry (this could include splitting sentences across lines of poetry and writing words and phrases that do not form complete sentences). You could also use the children’s work from some of the other writing tasks in this book to assess AF5, although they are designed mainly to focus on other AFs. Next steps for developing AF7 You could develop the children’s vocabulary and their appreciation of the effects of words through activities and discussions such as: • Picking out words from the children’s writing and talking about their effects: e.g. ‘suddenly’, ‘spluttered’, ‘clambered’. • Asking if they can think of some better words for some of the ones they used: e.g. is ‘suddenly’ used too often? Is it always the best word? Perhaps consider ‘all of a sudden’, ‘in a flash’. • Enacting scenes, considering how a person spoke or moved then asking for words to express this and suggesting some: ‘yelled’, ‘whispered’, ‘strode’ etc. This should be part of a range of writing activities from which evidence is gathered for AF7. Evidence for AF7 can also be gathered from: • writing connected with topics the children have studied in other subjects; • previous work on powerful or expressive verbs or adjectives. Task 1 on pages 7 to 16, Task 2 on pages 17 to 25 and Task 6 on pages 56 to 64 provide other opportunities to gather evidence for AF7. © Pearson Education Ltd 2010. APP for Reading and Writing: Year 3 55 Sample pages from APP for Reading and Writing Year 3 19 www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22
  • A P P for... Order APP for Science, Maths or Reading & Writing online or by phone. www.pearsonschools.co.uk/app4 0845 630 22 22 To see more of what Pearson Primary has to offer, and to download and try a variety of print and interactive samples for free, why not visit our website? We’ve a wide range of exciting resources available to meet your needs including support for APP, mixed-age classes, struggling learners, ECAR and more. www.pearsonschools.co.uk/primary Q341 P10APM00013