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Misuse of wetlands lecture 9

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Environmental Science lecture 9

Environmental Science lecture 9

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  • 1. Environmental Science A Study of Interrelationships Thirteenth Edition Enger & Smith Chapter 12 Land-Use Planning Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
  • 2. Land-Use Planning
  • 3. 12.1 The Need for Planning  Once converted to intensive human use, • unavailable for other uses  Present land use in the United States: • 52% - Crops and livestock • 44% - Forests and natural areas • 4% - Intensive human use
  • 4. 12.2 Historical Forces That Shaped Land Use  North America rural • industrial growth began in last third of the 1800s.  Cities grew because of: • Industrial Revolution – farms to industrial jobs in cities • European immigrants – Congregated in cities – jobs were available
  • 5. Migration from the Central City to the Suburbs  As cities grew, • certain sections within city deteriorated • Pollution and crowding – made cities undesirable  In the early 1900s, • people moved out of cities • 1950 - 60% urban population lived in central cities. • 1990 - 30% urban population lived in central cities.
  • 6. Migration from the Central City to the Suburbs Rural-to-urban population shift
  • 7. Migration from the Central City to the Suburbs Rural-to-urban population shift
  • 8. Migration from the Central City to the Suburbs  Urban sprawl • Spread low-density, auto-dependent development • On rural land outside compact urban centers (suburban) • Characteristics: – Excessive land consumption. – Lack of choice in ways to travel. – Fragmented open space (scattered appearance). – Lack of choice in housing – Segregation of commercial and housing – Lack of public spaces
  • 9. 12.4 Problems Associated with Unplanned Growth  Death of the Central City • less than 10% work in the central city.  Loss of Sense of Community • feeling isolated  Higher Infrastructure Costs • Extension of municipal services more costly
  • 10. 12.4 Problems Associated with Unplanned Growth  Transportation • As cities grew, – little thought given to transportation corridors. – constant road building. – Large Metro – 40 hours/year stuck in traffic
  • 11. 12.4 Problems Associated with Unplanned Growth Loss of Open Space and Farmland
  • 12. 12.4 Problems Associated with Unplanned Growth  Air Pollution • traffic increases, so does air pollution. • public transportation difficult with highly dispersed population.  Water Pollution – high runoff and potential flooding.
  • 13. 12.4 Problems Associated with Unplanned Growth  Floodplain (low areas near rivers) • flooding • Many cities on floodplains – originally established along waterways. – Flat land is attractive to developers – Flood control structures – Forces water downstream – floodplain zoning ordinances – Restrict building in floodplain
  • 14. 12.4 Problems Associated with Unplanned Growth Flooding in Floodplain
  • 15. 12.4 Problems Associated with Unplanned Growth  Wetlands (like estuaries) • areas periodically covered with water. • Many have been drained, filled, or used as landfills. – U.S. lost 53% of wetlands since the European immigration – Reproductive phase of many organisms. – Provide sediment filtration.
  • 16. 12.5 Land-Use Planning Principles  Land-use planning • • • • process of evaluating: needs and wants of a population, the land characteristics and value, various alternative solutions to land uses before changes are made. • A basic rule should be to make as few changes as possible.
  • 17. 12.7 Special Urban Planning Issues  Urban Transportation Planning • Four goals: – Conserve energy and land resources. – Provide efficient and inexpensive transportation, – Provide efficient transportation to suburban. – Reduce urban pollution.
  • 18. 12.7 Special Urban Planning Issues  Urban open space; recreation planning • nature centers
  • 19. 12.7 Special Urban Planning Issues  Smart growth • Developing “livable” cities and towns. • Quality of environment directly affects quality of life.  Principles: • • • • • Mix land uses. compact building designs (multistory) Walkable neighborhoods Preserve open space Variety of transportation choices.
  • 20. 12.7 Special Urban Planning Issues  Smart growth • building of “green buildings.” • using recycled materials, • ensuring better ventilation in buildings, • reducing water and energy use
  • 21. Environmental Science A Study of Interrelationships Thirteenth Edition Enger & Smith Chapter 14 Agricultural Methods and Pest Management Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
  • 22. 14.1 The Development of Agriculture  Development of agriculture • manipulating environment to produce food • increase in human population.  Mechanized monoculture agriculture • manufacture pesticides and fertilizer
  • 23. 14.1 The Development of Agriculture  Problems with mechanized monoculture agriculture: • Increases soil erosion. • Little genetic differentiation – increased pesticide use. • No crop rotation depletes soil nutrients, – increasing fertilizer use.
  • 24. 14.3 Agricultural Chemical Use  A pesticide • any chemical used to kill or control populations of unwanted fungi, plants, or animals (pests).  Based on the organisms they control. • • • • • Insecticides -- insect populations. Fungicides---fungal pests. Rodenticides---mice and rats. Herbicides --plant pests. Biocides
  • 25. 14.3 Agricultural Chemical Use  The discovery of chemicals that could kill insects • major advance in the control of disease and the protection of crops. • Mosquitoes  In 1942, DDT became the first synthetic organic insecticide produced.
  • 26. 14.3 Agricultural Chemical Use  Organophosphates and carbamates • short-lived pesticides • do not persist in the environment.  Affect the nerve cells of humans and other vertebrates  Must use special equipment  receive special training in safe application practices.
  • 27. 14.3 Agricultural Chemical Use  Herbicides • • • • • control unwanted plants heavily used in genetically modified crops. 60% of all pesticides used in U.S. Weeds compete with crops for soil nutrients Traditional weed control methods – expensive in terms of time and energy.
  • 28. 14.3 Agricultural Chemical Use  Fungicides • protect agricultural crops from spoilage • prevent spread of disease • protect seeds from rotting in the ground – Methyl mercury is extremely toxic to humans.  Rodenticides  prevent poisoning non-target organisms  Especially humans
  • 29. 14.4 Problems with Pesticide Use  Persistent pesticides (DDT) • attached to small soil particles • easily moved by wind or water. • distributed throughout the world from local applications. • Discovered in polar ice • present in the bodies of animals, including humans, throughout the world.
  • 30. 14.4 Problems with Pesticide Use  Bioaccumulation • process of accumulating higher and higher amounts of material within an organism’s body. – build up in fat tissues.  Biomagnification • process of acquiring increasing levels of a substance in bodies of higher trophic-level organisms. – DDT, mercury, and PCBs
  • 31. The biomagnification of DDT
  • 32. 14.4 Problems with Pesticide Use  Pesticide resistance • Insecticides only kill susceptible individuals. • Surviving individuals – characteristics allowed them to tolerate the pesticide. – Survivors pass on genetic characteristics for tolerance. – Subsequent pesticide applications less effective.
  • 33. 14.4 Problems with Pesticide Use  Most pesticides are not species-specific • kill beneficial species as well as pest species. • Many kill predator and parasitic insects – normally control pest insects. • Insecticides may change the population structure – species not previously a problem may become a serious pest.
  • 34. 14.4 Problems with Pesticide Use  Short-term and long-term health effects  Acute poisoning during application  WHO • 1 million and 5 million acute pesticide poisonings a year • resulting in 20,000 deaths. • Farmers exposed to pesticides over many years – higher levels of certain kinds of cancers
  • 35. Environmental Science A Study of Interrelationships Thirteenth Edition Enger & Smith Chapter 15 Water Management Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
  • 36. 15.5 Kinds of Water Use Urban domestic water uses
  • 37. 15.6 Kinds and Sources of Water Pollution  Disease-causing organisms • pollution problem in most of the world.  Source of these organisms • Untreated or inadequately treated human or domesticated animal waste • Sewage treatment and drinking-water treatment plants – reduce this public health problem.
  • 38. 15.6 Kinds and Sources of Water Pollution  Point source • source of pollution readily located… identified. • Municipal and industrial waste (discharge pipes).  Nonpoint sources • • • • Difficult to identify and control. Pollutants from agricultural land Pollutants urban paved surfaces Acid rain
  • 39. 15.6 Kinds and Sources of Water Pollution  Protect surface and ground waters from nonpoint pollution: • Use less toxic or nontoxic alternatives to home chemicals. • Buy chemicals only in the amount you need, apply as directed. • Unwanted household chemicals to hazardous waste collection centers. – not pour them down the drain.
  • 40. 15.6 Kinds and Sources of Water Pollution  Municipal Water Pollution • Waste from homes – organic matter from garbage, food preparation, cleaning of clothes and dishes, and human waste. – Fecal coliform bacteria  Agricultural activities are the primary cause of water pollution. • Excessive fertilizer • Runoff from animal feedlots carries nutrients, organic matter, and bacteria.
  • 41. Wastewater Treatment
  • 42. 15.6 Kinds and Sources of Water Pollution  Factories and industrial complexes • frequently dispose of waste in municipal sewage systems. • may require special wastewater treatment.  Mining – Industrial water pollution. • Chemical run-off is released into streams. • Water draining from mines is highly acidic.
  • 43. Environmental Science A Study of Interrelationships Thirteenth Edition Enger & Smith Chapter 16 Air Quality Issues Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
  • 44. 16.3 Categories of Air Pollutants  Primary air pollutants • released directly into the atmosphere • sufficient quantities to pose a health risk. They are: • Carbon monoxide • Volatile organic compounds (hydrocarbons) • Particulate matter • Sulfur dioxide • Oxides of nitrogen
  • 45. 16.3 Categories of Air Pollutants  Carbon monoxide • organic materials are burned with insufficient oxygen. • The single largest source is the automobile. – Remainder from burning, i.e., power plants, leaves, etc. • Binds to hemoglobin in blood – makes the hemoglobin less able to carry oxygen. • It is most dangerous in enclosed spaces
  • 46. 16.3 Categories of Air Pollutants  Sulfur dioxide (SO2) • compound of sulfur and oxygen produced when sulfurcontaining fossil fuels are burned. • Burning coal releases SO2. • coal-burning power plants. – U.S. levels of SO2 decreased 56% between 1990 and 2007.
  • 47. 16.3 Categories of Air Pollutants  Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) are formed when fossil fuels are burned. • Nitrogen monoxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) most common. • Burning fossil fuels in internal combustion engines – Primary source of nitrogen oxides. – Automobiles produce 38% – Non-road motorized equipment produces 21%
  • 48. 16.7 Global Warming and Climate Change  Climatic records indicate over the past 160,000 years • close correlation between greenhouse gas concentration and global temperatures. • Climate change report (2007) – Average temperature on Earth has increased 0.56 to 0.92°C (1.0-1.7° F) in the past 100 years – Sea level is rising about 1.8 mm/yr or 18 cm in 100 years
  • 49. Changes in Average Global Temp
  • 50. 16.7 Global Warming and Climate Change  .A strong correlation exists between temperature increase and amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. • Human activity increases greenhouse gases in atmosphere. – Greenhouse gases increased 70% btw 1970 and 2004
  • 51. 16.7 Global Warming and Climate Change  Greenhouse effect: • Greenhouse gases allow sunlight to penetrate the atmosphere. • Sunlight is absorbed by Earth’s surface. • It is reradiated as infrared energy (heat). • The heat is absorbed by gases in the atmosphere.
  • 52. 16.7 Global Warming and Climate Change Greenhouse effect
  • 53. 16.7 Global Warming and Climate Change  Carbon dioxide--most abundant of the greenhouse gases. • Deforestation contributes to the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.  Methane • comes from biological sources and • from some fossil-fuel burning activities.  Nitrous oxide • from fossil fuels and fertilizers.  Chlorofluorocarbons from refrigerants, and propellants.
  • 54. 16.7 Global Warming and Climate Change  Small increase in the average temperature may seem trivial • set in motion changes that could significantly alter the climate • Affect: – hydrologic cycle – sea level, – human health, – survival and distribution of organisms – use of natural resources by people.