Budget and financialaudit
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Budget and financialaudit

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Budget and financialaudit Budget and financialaudit Presentation Transcript

  • PRESENTED BY : VRUTI PATEL, FINAL YEAR M.SC., SNC.
  • Budget word was first coined by the British Kings in early days from the word ‘BOUGETTE’ which means leather bag or pouch. A budget is a tool for planning, quantifying the plans and controlling costs. - Flinker, 1984 A budget is a plan that uses numerical data to predict the activities of an organization over a period of time and it provides a mechanism for planning each unit’s needs and contributions. - carruth, carruth and Noto, 2000
  • A budget can be defined as ‘a tool used to relate planned resource consumption to a period of time’. - Mellett et al. 1993 This definition highlights the three main features of a budget: • It is a plan that is developed before an event has occurred; • It can include a broad range of resources – not just money; • It relates to a specific period of time.
  • WHAT IS UNION BUDGET ? •The union budget of India, referred to as annual Financial Statement in Article 112 of constitution of India, is the annual budget of the Republic of India, presented each year on the last working day of February by the Finance Minister of India in Parliament. •The budget has to be passed by the parliament house before it come into effect on April 1, the start of India's financial year. The Union Budget 2013-14 presented by P.Chidambaram on 28 February 2013,11 am, the Financial Minister of India. •The budget implemented on 1st April 2013.
  • 1 2 3 4 BUDGET APPROVAL BUDGET ESTIMATE PREPARATION BUDGET MONITORING STEPS IN BUDGETARY PROCESS BUDGET ALLOCATION
  • LOGO ADMINISTRATORGOVERNING BODY DEPARTMENT HEADBUDGET DIRECTOR 1 2 3 4 BUDGET ESTIMATE PREPARATION
  • THE GOVERNING BODY • Responsible for the general planning function • Selects the budget steering committee, determines the budgetary objectives, and reviews and approves the master budget. THE ADMINISTRATOR • Responsible for the formulation and execution of the budget • by correlating the governing board’s goals with the guidelines for budget preparation and supervising the budget preparation.
  • THE BUDGET DIRECTOR •Responsible for the budgeting procedures and reporting. •Establishes a completion timetable. •Forms prepared, and supervises data collection and budget preparation. •serves as the chairperson of the steering committee, which approves the budget before it is submitted to the governing board.
  • DEPARTMENT HEADS •Prepare and review goals and objectives and prepare the budgets for their departments. •Departmental budgets need to be prepared and coordinated. •During this phase, units of service, staffing patterns, salary and non-salary expenses and revenues are forecasted so that preliminary rate setting can be done.
  • ITEM NO INCOME EXPENDITURE ACTUAL LAST YEAR CURRENT BUDGET ACTUAL BUDGET NEXT YEAR PROPOSED APPROVED                                                            
  • The revised estimate is an estimate of the probable receipts or expenditure for a financial year, framed in the course of that year. It does not authorise any expenditure, nor does it supersede the budget estimate as the basis for regulation of the expenditure. If an excess is anticipated in the revised estimate under any particular head, it is necessary for controlling authority to apply separately in proper time for REVISED ESIMATION
  • PLAN EXPENDITURE  Plan expenditure is estimated after discussions between each of the ministries concerned and the Planning Commission.  Plan expenditure forms sizeable proportion of the total expenditure of the Central Government.  The demands for Grants of the various Ministries show the Plan expenditure under each head separately from the Non-Plan expenditure.
  • NON-PLAN REVENUE EXPENDITURE  Non-plan revenue expenditure is accounted for by interest payments, subsidies (mainly on food and fertilizers), wage and salary payments to government employees, grants to States and Union Territories governments, pensions, police, economic services in various sectors, other general services such as tax collection, social services, and grants to foreign governments. The expenditure in developing ‘planned’
  •  Non-plan capital expenditure mainly includes defence, loans to public enterprises, loans to states, union territories and foreign governments.  The maintenance and running of the existing projects is known as non-plan expenditure. NON-PLAN CAPITAL EXPENDITURE
  • 1 2 3 TYPES TYPESOFBUDGET ZERO BASED PERFORMANCE CAPITAL AND REVENUE
  • ZERO-BASED BUDGETING  one of the budgets that do not utilize any historical data to determine activity level of expenses anticipated.  All the expenses are justified based on expectation or desires for the upcoming year.  Zero based budgeting was adopted in India in 1986 as a technique for determining expenditure budgets.
  •  According to the ministries of Finance instructed all the administrative ministries to review their respective programmes and activities in order to prepare expenditure budget estimates based on the principles of zero based budgeting.
  • STEPS IN ZERO BASE BUDETING
  • ADVANTAGES • Forces the nurse managers to plan each program package afresh. • Avoids the common tendency in budgeting of looking at changes from a previous period • Efficient allocation of resources, as it is based on needs and benefits • Cost effective ways to improve operations • Detects inflated budgets • Useful for service departments where the output is difficult to identify.
  • • Increases staff motivation by providing greater initiative and responsibility in decision-making. • Increases communication and coordination within the organization • Identifies and eliminates wasteful and obsolete operations. • They force managers to set priorities and use resources most efficiently. • Identifies opportunities for outsourcing • Forces cost centres to identify their mission and their relationship to overall goals.
  • DISADVANTAGES • Difficult to define decision units and decision packages, as it is time-consuming and exhaustive. • Forced to justify every detail related to expenditure. • Necessary to train managers. • Difficult to administered and communicate the budgeting because more mangers are involved in process. • Compressing the information down to a useable size might remove critically important details. • Honesty of the managers must be reliable and uniform.
  • CAPITAL BUDGET • It consists of capital receipts and payments. Capital Budget also incorporates transactions in the Public Account.
  • • Capital receipts: The main items of capital receipts are loans raised by Government from public which are called Market Loans, borrowings by Government from Reserve Bank and other parties through sale of Treasury Bills, loans received from foreign Governments and bodies and recoveries of loans granted by Central Government to State and Union Territory Governments and other parties.
  • • Capital payments: Capital payments consist of capital expenditure on acquisition of assets like land, buildings, machinery, equipment, as also investments in shares, etc., and loans and advances granted by Central Government to State and Union Territory Governments, Government companies, Corporations and other parties.
  • REVENUE BUDGET • Revenue defined as total income produced by a given source. The revenue budget consists of revenue receipts of the governments (revenues from tax and other sources) and the expenditure met from these revenues.
  • Revenue Receipts: Revenue receipts are divided into tax and non-tax revenue. •Tax revenues are made up of taxes such as income tax, corporate tax, excise, customs and other duties which the government levies. •Non-tax revenue consists of interest and dividend on investments made by government, fees and other receipts for services rendered by Government.
  • • Revenue expenditure: Revenue expenditure is the payment incurred for the normal day-to-day running of government departments and various services that it offers to its citizens. • The government also has other expenditure like servicing interest on its borrowings, subsidies, etc. Usually, expenditure that does not result in the creation of assets, and grants given to state governments and other parties are revenue expenditures.
  • • The difference between revenue receipts and revenue expenditure is usually negative. This means that the government spends more than it earns. This difference is called the revenue deficit.
  • PERFORMANCE BUDGETING • It is based on functions such as direct nursing care, supervision, in service education, nursing audit and so on.
  • STEPS IN PERFORMANCE BUDGETING • Identify and analyse the work of organization into functions, sub functions; programmes, sub programmes, activities, sub activities in result • Lay down the targets of each scheme, function, programs • Set the performance norms or standards for each activity or task. • Identify specific indicators regarding each task.
  • • Specify means of achieving them. • Design the monitoring and evaluation system or performance recording and reporting system. • Calculate the costs of all inputs, resources to achieve the targets in terms of benefits • Thus the performance budgeting tries to define the physical and financial aspects of each program and activities and thereby establishes the relationship between output and inputs. IT assesses each programme in the light of financial and economic factors.
  • Tools Used in Performance Budgeting It involves the development and use of more refined management tools : •Work measurement studies to measure or to identify various works. •Performance standards and its specific indications to measure the performance •Monitoring methods like PERT •Other methods like cost analysis.
  • ALLOCATION OF RESOURCES BUDGET EXECUTION APPRAISAL ANDEVALUATION PREPARATIOPN OF BUDGET
  • MID TERM APPRISAL • The Mid Term Appraisal (MTA) reviews the experience in the first three years of the five year plan and seeks to identify areas where corrective steps may be needed. • Provides an opportunity to take stock of the economy and to introduce policy correctives and new initiatives in critical areas in the context of the new priorities, the success achieved on the investment front. • MTA presents a candid assessment of the resources position facing both the centre and the state and the implications.
  • AUDIT • Audit is an assessment of the management practices, financials and operations of an organization. • According to the institute of chartered Accountants of India (ICAI) ‘Auditing is the independent examination of financial information of any entity, whether profit oriented or not, and irrespective of its size or legal form, when such an examination is conducted with a view to expressing an opinion thereon.’
  • • The Marriam-webstar Dictionary defines an audit as ‘a formal examination of an organization or individual’s accounts or financial situation.
  • PURPOSES  It makes sure that all the financial statement of concern is presented fairly.  Audit gives a fair and true picture in accordance with financial reporting framework.  It enhances the degree of confidence of intended users in financial statement.
  • EXTERNAL AUDIT •click to add text INTERNAL AUDIT TYPES OF AUDIT
  • EXTERNAL AUDIT • An external audit is a review of the financial statements or reports of an entity, usually a government or business, by someone not affiliated with the organization or agency. • The audit is conducted by regulatory agency hired by the entity and the auditors are generally in public accounts.
  •  For government or public sectors, an external audit will include a review of the budget, the allocation of funds and the actual expenses to ensure the budgeted revenues and expenses were correctly compiled and used.
  •  In a private-sector, it includes a review of the organization quarterly or monthly financial reports as well as statement on revenues and expenditure to ensure they are correctly tabulated and reported.  Usually conducted once a year at the end of fiscal year.  A yearend financial report is prepared by the entity, which is one of the documents verified in external audit.
  • FINANCIAL AUDIT OPERATIONAL AUDIT COMPILANCE AUDIT TYPES OF EXTERNAL AUDIT
  • FEATURES OF THE EXTERNAL AUDIT • It generates a summary of overall validity of the financial statement. • It uncovers the discrepancies between the statements. Presented by the organization and the external the external auditor. • It reflects the conclusion of the audit.
  • PURPOSE OF EXTERNAL AUDIT • The main purpose of external audit is to ensure that internal control, processes, guidelines are adequate and in line with the government requirements. • To provide an independent and unbiased assessment of an organization’s internal governance and financial matters. • To verify internal procedures. • To evaluate adherence of the organization to standards and principals. • To evaluate the adequacy and effectiveness of existing internal control.
  • INTERNAL AUDIT • Internal audit has been recognized as an aid to management for monitoring the financial performance and effectiveness of various departments in the execution of various programmes. • According to the Institute of internal auditors (IIA), internal auditing is an independent objective assuring and consulting activity design to add values and improve organization operations.
  • OBJECTIVE OF INTERNAL AUDIT • To suggest improvements to the functioning of the entity organization • To strengthen the overall governance mechanism of the entity organization including its strategic risk management as well as internal control system • To prepare for the external audit
  • PURPOSE OF INTERNAL AUDIT • To establish standards and to provide guidance in respect of internal planning.
  • ROLE OF INTERNAL AUDIT Regulatory and compliance role •Quality of public expenditure •Proper implementation of rules and regulation •Maintenance of proper records •Accuracy in expenditure reporting
  • Efficiency cum performance roles •Efficiency and economy in public expenditure •Propriety of expenditure •Effectiveness of expenditure •Proper realization, accounting and reporting of revenue receipts.
  • ThankYou