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Conducting a Capital Campaign in the Current Economy
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  • 1. CONDUCTING A CAPITAL CAMPAIGN IN THE CURRENT ECONOMY November 17, 2009
  • 2. The Curtis Group
    • OUR MISSION
    • Committed to promoting philanthropy,
    • we help you plan your future, build awareness,
    • and raise substantial amounts of money.
  • 3. The Curtis Group
    • We offer fundraising consulting & marketing services for nonprofit organizations
      • Development Assessments & Planning
      • Campaign Feasibility Studies
      • Campaign Management & Counsel
      • Fundraising Marketing & Communications
      • Planned Giving
  • 4. The Curtis Group
    • Raised hundreds of millions for more than 80 nonprofits
    • Celebrating our 20 th anniversary this year
    • Only Virginia-based member of North America’s 35-member Giving Institute
  • 5. Giving Institute: Leading Consultants To Nonprofits
    • Offers thought leadership on philanthropy
    • Promotes high standards of ethical fundraising
    • Publishes annual Giving USA and quarterly Giving USA Spotlights
  • 6.
    • Are you considering
    • a major campaign?
  • 7.
    • Have you put your
    • campaign plans on hold?
  • 8. 2008 Charitable Giving Total = $307.65 billion ($ in billions) Individuals $229.28 75% Foundations $41.21 13% Bequests $22.66 7% Corporations $14.50 5% Source: Giving USA 2009
  • 9. Recipients of Gifts, 2008 Total = $307.65 billion ($ in billions) Environment and Animals $6.58 2% Grants to Individuals* $3.71 1% Human Services $25.88 9% International Affairs $13.30 4 % Arts, Culture, and Humanities $12.79 4% Public-Society Benefit $23.88 8% Unallocated giving $19.39 6% Health $21.64 7 % Gifts to Foundations $32.65 11% * *Foundation grants awarded to individuals Religion $106.89 35% Education $40.94 13%
  • 10. Changes by Recipient Organization 2007–2008 2006–2007
  • 11. Recent S&P Activity Source: BigCharts/MarketWatch.com
  • 12. Importance of Individual Giving
    • 88% of giving comes from individuals
    • 10% ($100,000+ incomes) give 51% of individual $
    • Between 1996 and 2008, number of nonprofits jumped 81%, f rom 654,000 to 1.2 million
    • January 2009 survey by Cygnus found that:
      • 42% percent of donors would give to nonprofit they had not supported before if someone they knew asked for gift
  • 13. High-Net-Worth Households
    • The more they volunteered, the larger their gifts
      • Average gift, non-volunteers: $35,127
      • Average gift, volunteers, 101-200 hours: $124,267
      • Average gift, volunteers, 200+ hours: $132,315
    • Top reason they stopped giving to nonprofit:
    • “ No longer feeling connected to the organization”
    • Source: “2008 Study of High Net Worth Philanthropy” by Bank of America & Indiana University Center on Philanthropy (HNW = $200,000+ income or $1 million+ net worth)
  • 14.
    • Have you ever been involved with a major campaign?
  • 15. What Is a Campaign?
    • Large, intensive, volunteer fundraising effort conducted over long, defined timeframe
    • Raises large sum for specific purpose
    • Focus is big gifts pledged over multi-year period
      • Not effort to seek average gifts
    • Personal solicitations with specific asks
      • By board members and volunteers who call on people they know
  • 16. Phases of a Major Campaign
    • Phase I: Feasibility Study
    • Phase II: Planning & Organization
    • Phase III: Leadership, the Quiet Phase
    • Phase IV: Public Phase
  • 17. Phase I: Feasibility Study
    • Takes three to four months
    • Series of confidential interviews with potential volunteers and donors that:
      • Assesses image and reputation
      • Identifies priority of need
      • Determines if volunteers are willing to help and contributors are willing to give
      • Lays groundwork for education and cultivation
      • Bottom Line: Will people give and get major gifts?
  • 18. Phase II: Planning & Organization
    • Successful fundraising is 80% organization
    • and 20% solicitation
  • 19. Phase II: Planning & Organization
    • Takes six to nine months or more
    • In planning phase:
      • Finalize funding priorities
      • Write case for support
      • Identify campaign leadership
      • Determine staff’s role
      • Solicit the board
      • Develop donor pool
      • Create campaign materials
  • 20. Guidelines for Capital Campaign Gifts
    • Top Gift = 10% of Goal
    • Next 10 Gifts = 25% of Goal
    • Next 100 Gifts = 40% of Goal
    • Remainder of Gifts = 25% of Goal
    • 100%
  • 21. Phase III: Leadership, the Quiet Phase
    • Takes 12 to 15 months
    • Recruit campaign chair
      • Must be visible in community, able to open doors
      • Must make a lead gift; must ask others
    • Most critical function is leadership – form a strong Steering Committee
  • 22. Phase III: Leadership, the Quiet Phase
    • Solicit advance gifts and fundraising volunteers
    • Identify, research, and evaluate lead and major gift prospects
      • Best prospects are current givers and your board
    • Hold cultivation events
    • Begin to solicit lead and major gifts
  • 23. Phase III: Leadership, the Quiet Phase
    • Keep in mind:
    • If you were to start Phase I now, you would just be starting Phase III about a year from now
    • By early 2011, when there’s a good chance the economy has improved, you’ll be in early stages of quiet phase
  • 24. Phase IV: Public Phase
    • Takes six to 12 months
    • Announce campaign publicly when:
      • At least 60% of goal raised
      • Pledges made by all board members
      • Leadership gifts in hand
      • Major gifts being solicited
  • 25. Phase IV: Public Phase
    • Public phase
      • Still involves face-to-face calls with bigger donors
      • Use direct mail for smaller gifts
      • Hold special events
  • 26. What We’re Seeing
    • HNWI giving to fewer nonprofits but still giving
    • Fewer building and endowment campaigns; focus is on programs and operating efforts
    • More funding of human services vs. the arts
    • Private family foundations pulling back
  • 27. What We’re Seeing
    • Giving decisions taking longer; not getting declines but not getting responses
    • Some donors staging their gifts over time
    • Volunteers hesitant to make calls
    • Donors apologizing for not giving more
  • 28. What We’re Seeing
    • Some layoffs, cutbacks, talk of mergers
    • Income from fundraising events is down
    • Bank of America/Wachovia effect
    • BUT—
    • Nonprofits doing it right way are having success
  • 29. What We’re Advising
    • Giving tracks the stock market and personal income
    • A drop in giving is probable this year
    • Even so, people with money will still give
    • You must work to remain a philanthropic priority
  • 30. Are You Ready for a Campaign?
    • 1. Now more than ever, your case must articulate needs and successes clearly and concisely
      • Test your case; does it advance your mission?
      • Donors want specifics on how gift will make a difference
  • 31. Are You Ready for a Campaign?
    • 2. Board members must be clear about their role;
    • talk to them
      • It’s not only about the ask
      • Must be advocates and thank donors
      • Should visit donors to begin campaign cultivation process
  • 32. Are You Ready for a Campaign?
      • 3. Help your board by having regular training sessions
    • 4. Keep your current donors close
      • Talk to top 10-20% about their funding interests
      • Make sure communication is one on one
      • It’s appointments vs. asking
    • 5. Create a cultivation plan for each top donor
  • 33. Are You Ready for a Campaign?
      • 6. Develop new leaders; they’ll be ready when
      • campaign launches
    • 7. Implement a consistent communications program
    • 8. Invest in campaign tools, such as fundraising
    • management software and prospect research
  • 34. Are You Ready for a Campaign?
    • 9. Don’t simply assume people won’t be able to
    • give; people with money will still give
    • 10. Focus on planning needed to become campaign-
    • ready; work to remain a philanthropic priority
  • 35. Campaign Must-Haves
    • Community’s confidence in the board and staff
    • Strong case for support
    • A board willing to give and get
    • Not just any, but the right campaign leadership
    • Top 10 lead gifts to set the tone for the campaign
    • Leaders experienced in major-gift solicitation
  • 36.
    • 757.496.2224
    • [email_address]
    • www.curtisgroupconsultants.com