Day 5 standards and digitial citizenship bridgewater 2011

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  • ISTE Performance Indicators ISTE provides a number of performance indicators for teachers, each of which addresses a different stage of a teaching career. Links to provided below: beginning pre-service teachers - prospective teachers - recent graduates from a teacher education program - teachers at the end of their first year - seasoned teachers, general standards for all teachers (??) When we look at specific issues for standard IV we will look at performance standards for all of these groups. Other ISTE standards 
 There are also standards for students and administrators that address social, ethical, legal and human issues. These are important to know as they will inform your teaching, as well as how you what you are teaching fits into the overall administrative goals of your institutions. Links to these include the following: student standards administrator standards What’s your philosophy? Click here examples of teacher philosophies of educational technology. What’s your school’s technology culture? Each school or educational environment has a unique technology culture. Typically, schools differ in their areas of technology specialty, their regard for technology, how they plan for technology and how they involve their educational community members in helping develop technology awareness, skills and perspectives. It is important to understand your school’s technology culture in order to be successful. To do so, try conducting an inventory of your school’s culture using Assessing a school’s technology culture . This casts you in the role of anthropologist, seeking to understand your school as a culture through the lens of technology adoption and organization. Whether you conduct the survey formally or informally, it will help you see more clearly your schools commitment to and understanding of technology in education.
  • ISTE Performance Indicators ISTE provides a number of performance indicators for teachers, each of which addresses a different stage of a teaching career. Links to provided below: beginning pre-service teachers - prospective teachers - recent graduates from a teacher education program - teachers at the end of their first year - seasoned teachers, general standards for all teachers (??) When we look at specific issues for standard IV we will look at performance standards for all of these groups. Other ISTE standards 
 There are also standards for students and administrators that address social, ethical, legal and human issues. These are important to know as they will inform your teaching, as well as how you what you are teaching fits into the overall administrative goals of your institutions. Links to these include the following: student standards administrator standards What’s your philosophy? Click here examples of teacher philosophies of educational technology. What’s your school’s technology culture? Each school or educational environment has a unique technology culture. Typically, schools differ in their areas of technology specialty, their regard for technology, how they plan for technology and how they involve their educational community members in helping develop technology awareness, skills and perspectives. It is important to understand your school’s technology culture in order to be successful. To do so, try conducting an inventory of your school’s culture using Assessing a school’s technology culture . This casts you in the role of anthropologist, seeking to understand your school as a culture through the lens of technology adoption and organization. Whether you conduct the survey formally or informally, it will help you see more clearly your schools commitment to and understanding of technology in education.
  • ISTE Performance Indicators ISTE provides a number of performance indicators for teachers, each of which addresses a different stage of a teaching career. Links to provided below: beginning pre-service teachers - prospective teachers - recent graduates from a teacher education program - teachers at the end of their first year - seasoned teachers, general standards for all teachers (??) When we look at specific issues for standard IV we will look at performance standards for all of these groups. Other ISTE standards 
 There are also standards for students and administrators that address social, ethical, legal and human issues. These are important to know as they will inform your teaching, as well as how you what you are teaching fits into the overall administrative goals of your institutions. Links to these include the following: student standards administrator standards What’s your philosophy? Click here examples of teacher philosophies of educational technology. What’s your school’s technology culture? Each school or educational environment has a unique technology culture. Typically, schools differ in their areas of technology specialty, their regard for technology, how they plan for technology and how they involve their educational community members in helping develop technology awareness, skills and perspectives. It is important to understand your school’s technology culture in order to be successful. To do so, try conducting an inventory of your school’s culture using Assessing a school’s technology culture . This casts you in the role of anthropologist, seeking to understand your school as a culture through the lens of technology adoption and organization. Whether you conduct the survey formally or informally, it will help you see more clearly your schools commitment to and understanding of technology in education.
  • ISTE Performance Indicators ISTE provides a number of performance indicators for teachers, each of which addresses a different stage of a teaching career. Links to provided below: beginning pre-service teachers - prospective teachers - recent graduates from a teacher education program - teachers at the end of their first year - seasoned teachers, general standards for all teachers (??) When we look at specific issues for standard IV we will look at performance standards for all of these groups. Other ISTE standards 
 There are also standards for students and administrators that address social, ethical, legal and human issues. These are important to know as they will inform your teaching, as well as how you what you are teaching fits into the overall administrative goals of your institutions. Links to these include the following: student standards administrator standards What’s your philosophy? Click here examples of teacher philosophies of educational technology. What’s your school’s technology culture? Each school or educational environment has a unique technology culture. Typically, schools differ in their areas of technology specialty, their regard for technology, how they plan for technology and how they involve their educational community members in helping develop technology awareness, skills and perspectives. It is important to understand your school’s technology culture in order to be successful. To do so, try conducting an inventory of your school’s culture using Assessing a school’s technology culture . This casts you in the role of anthropologist, seeking to understand your school as a culture through the lens of technology adoption and organization. Whether you conduct the survey formally or informally, it will help you see more clearly your schools commitment to and understanding of technology in education.
  • Sometimes this element is the most difficult for teachers to address in the classroom. Some teachers feel that this is not their responsibility to teach students to be informed, careful consumers. Because online purchasing is becoming the norm, students should be taught to understand this process. Anyone who is actively working, playing, or purchasing items online is a member not only of a digital community but of an economic community as well. Students need to understand that their actrions online can folow them throughout their life ( running up credit card debt).

Transcript

  • 1. Class 3
  • 2. Standards
  • 3.  
  • 4. Essential Conditions Self - Assessment
    • Review the essential conditions as outlined by iste…
    • How are we doing?
  • 5. What about Nova Scotia
    • Vision for ICT..
    • Skim and Scan….anything stand out?
  • 6.
    • 1. BASIC OPERATIONS AND CONCEPTS
    • Concepts and skills associated with the safe, efficient operation of a range of information and
    • communication technology.
    • 2. SOCIAL, ETHICAL, AND HUMAN ISSUES
    • The understanding associated with the use of ICT, which encourages in students a commitment to
    • pursue personal and social good, particularly to build and improve their learning environments and
    • to foster stronger relationships with their peers and others who support their learning.
    • 3. PRODUCTIVITY
    • The efficient selection and use of ICT to perform tasks such as
    • • the exploration of ideas
    • • data collection
    • • data manipulation, including the discovery of patterns and relationships
    • • problem solving
    • • the representation of learning
    • 4. COMMUNICATION
    • Specific, interactive technology use supports student collaboration and sharing through
    • communication.
    • 5. RESEARCH, PROBLEM SOLVING, AND DECISION MAKING
    • Students’ organization, reasoning, and evaluation of their learning rationalize their use of
    • information and communication technology.
    FRAMEWORK STRANDS FOR THE INTEGRATION OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • 7. Student Profiles
    • Realistic?
    • Thoughts?
  • 8. Zooming in on one…
  • 9. Standard 4 Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility
    • ISTE Standard IV- Promote and Model Digital Citizenship. Teachers understand local, global societal issues in an evolving digital culture and exhibit legal, ethical behavior in professional practices.
    • Teachers need to be able to (in abbreviated form):
      • advocate, model, teach the safe, legal, respectful, ethical use of digital information and technology, including copyright
      • address the diverse needs of all learners by using learner-centered strategies and providing access to tools and resources
      • promote digital etiquette and responsible interactions
      • develop, model cultural understanding, global awareness by engaging students, colleagues multiculturally using digital tools
  • 10. Nova Scotia equivalent?
    • 2. SOCIAL, ETHICAL, AND HUMAN ISSUES
    • The understanding associated with the use of ICT, which encourages in students a commitment to
    • pursue personal and social good, particularly to build and improve their learning environments and
    • to foster stronger relationships with their peers and others who support their learning.
  • 11. Unpacking Standard 4
    • The following activity comes from a presentation by Dr. Jason Ohler / www.jasonohler.com / jason.ohler@uas.alaska.edu
  • 12. ISTE Standard IV asks teachers to balance - and help their students balance - many things: PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview ISTE Standard IV seeks balance…
    • Opportunity, and responsibility
    • Excitement, and caution and consideration
    • Personal fulfillment, and community well-being
    • Global perspective, and local action
    • Empowerment, and invisible, displaced impacts
    • Philosophical considerations of living with technology, as part of their interests and ethics, and practical considerations, in terms of their behaviors, practices.
  • 13. PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Synthesis of all three sets of ISTE standards Drilling down, synthesizing these three sets standards, produces the following areas:
    • Area 1 : Social needs, cultural identity, global community
    • Area 2 : Equity, diversity, equal access
    • Area 3 : Legalities, ethics, copyright
    • Area 4 : Privacy and security
    • Area 5 : Safety and health
    • Area 6 : Media bias
    • Area 7 : Personal responsibility, appropriate vs.
    • inappropriate technology use, translating good behavior into the technical world
    Synthesis of all 3 standards sets… Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview
  • 14. PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Good question to ask yourself How has my unit of instruction, approach to content and method for engaging students addressed the following:
    • Area 1 : Social needs, cultural identity, global community
    • Area 2 : Equity, diversity, equal access
    • Area 3 : Legalities, ethics, copyright
    • Area 4 : Privacy and security
    • Area 5 : Safety and health
    • Area 6 : Media bias
    • Area 7 : Personal responsibility, appropriate vs.
    • inappropriate technology use, translating good behavior into the technical world
    Synthesis of all 3 standards sets… Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview
  • 15. The seven pieces of the ethics, social impacts puzzle This chapter looks at the seven areas of social and ethical concern that emerge from ISTE’s administrator, teacher and student standards. PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
  • 16. Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle Overview PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited ISTE Standards revisited With our crash course in technology investigation complete, let’s take another look at the ISTE standards. Synthesizing many standards. You will recall that ISTE has several sets of standards related to social and ethical issues. To begin with, they have separate standards for administrators, teachers and students. In addition, although Teacher Standard IV provides general direction for all teachers, ISTE created performance profiles for four specific phases of a teacher’s career: general education preparation, professional teacher preparation, classroom internship, and first-year teaching. Each profile addresses specific issues about “the social, ethical, legal and human issues” associated with technology use in the classroom.
  • 17. Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle Overview PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited ISTE Standards revisited, cont’d You will also recall that it is because of all of the standards that exist in this area that I synthesized them so that we could all have a common set of talking points, regardless of our position in our school community. The synthesis revealed the following categories, that fit together like pieces to a puzzle: 1. social needs, cultural identity, global community 2. equity, diversity, access, assistive technology 3. legalities, ethics, copyright 4. privacy and security 5. safety, health 6. media bias 7. personal responsibility, appropriate tech use
  • 18. Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle Overview PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited ISTE Standards revisited, cont’d Add your own web resources. The following information is provided for each area:
    • An overview of the issue
    • Essential questions and thinking points
    • At least one web resources, with room for you to add your own. Web resources come and go, so I leave it to you to find the web resources that are best suited for your particular unit of instruction, as well as the age and grade level of your students.
  • 19. Area 1: Social, cultural, global issues ISTE Standard IV Area 1 - Social needs, cultural identity, global community This area of ISTE standards is concerned with how teachers can take advantage of “the global village” created by the Internet to engage students in learning about social, environmental and other large-scale issues. It is also concerned with using the Internet to help students appreciate the similarities and differences that exist among cultures. And it is concerned with how the Internet can connect all the stakeholders in the local educational process: schools, parents, students, and community.
    • Essential questions/thinking points
    • What academic projects allow students to explore how technology both strengthens and challenges cultural identity and global community?
    • What issues are common to students from diverse cultural and geographic backgrounds?
    • How can you use technology to build bridges among family, school and community?
    Helpful links: The Global Nomad Group . A non-profit organization dedicated to heightening children's understanding and appreciation for the world and its people, using interactive technologies such as videoconferencing. http://www.gng.org/ The Global SchoolNet Foundation . GSN is a not-for-profit that has been linking classrooms around the world since 1984. http://www.globalschoolnet.org/index.html Add Your Links Here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
  • 20. ISTE Standard IV Area 2 - Equity, diversity, access, assistive technology This area of ISTE standards focuses on how technology can be a barrier as well as a gateway to opportunity for students. It is concerned with how technology can level the playing field for all students, or, if we aren’t careful, favor some and exclude others due to physical, financial or social limitations.
    • Essential questions/thinking points
    • How can we use technology to promote learner inclusion?
    • What assistive technologies exist that can help the students in your classroom?
    • What do the applicable laws and school policies say about inclusion and assistive technology?
    • How does the digital divide effect your classroom?
    Area 2: Equity, diversity, access, assistive tech Helpful links: The Digital Divide Network. The Digital Divide Network is one of the Internet's largest community for educators, activists, policy makers and concerned citizens working to bridge the digital divide. http://www.digitaldividenetwork.org/ Add your links here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
  • 21. Area 3: Legalities, ethics, copyright ISTE Standard IV Area 3 - Legalities, ethics, copyright This area of ISTE standards focuses on the ethical, respectful and legal use of software, information and media. In addition, it addresses how to approach the development of appropriate use policies for schools and classrooms.
    • Essential questions/thinking points
    • How does the “the golden rule” apply to using information and media on the Internet?
    • When it comes to the educational use of software and material found on the Internet, what do copyright laws actually say?
    • When should you and your students cite sources vs. ask permission vs. provide compensation?
    • A question for students: What if it was your original music someone else was downloading?
    Helpful links: Copyright Kids . Sponsored by Friends of Active Copyright Education, it provides information for kids, teachers and parents about copyright law and related issues. http://www.copyrightkids.org/ John Brim’s Copyright videos . A series of short videos aimed at helping teachers understand classroom implications for copyright. http://users.mhc.edu/facultystaff/awalter//Brim%20site/index.html Add your links here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
  • 22. Area 4: Privacy, security ISTE Standard IV Area 4 - Privacy and security This area of ISTE standards addresses the balancing act we all must do to live in the Digital Age. We must balance the privacy of students and teachers with legitimate needs for access to information by parents and school districts. We must balance our desire for convenient, open, easy-to-use systems with the vulnerability they create. We must balance our need for secure technological environments with the fact that they can often be restrictive and unfriendly.
    • Essential questions/thinking points
    • What is your school’s policy about accessing student information?
    • What is your school’s policy about posting student photos and student names online?
    • How does your IT department protect you and your students from SPAM and security breaches
    • What does your school’s legal counsel have to say about these issues?
    Helpful links: Children and Technology: 11 Steps to Healthy Computer Use . An informative site developed by Revolution Health. http://www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs29-education.htm Add Your Links Here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
  • 23. Area 5: Safety, health ISTE Standard IV Area 5 - Safety, health This area of ISTE standards addresses issues of physical health, such as ergonomics, radiation, eye strain, and physical inactivity. It also addresses issues of virtual safety, such as cyber stalking and cyber predation.
    • Essential questions/thinking points
    • Do you set limits on how much time students can spend at a computer? Do you blend computer activities with other kinds of activities?
    • How do you monitor what your students do online?
    • What rules do you give students about identifying themselves online?
    • What are students instructed to do when they receive something inappropriate?
    • What advice do you give parents about how to help ensure their children are safe online/
    Helpful links: Privacy Rights Clearing House Education Report. The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) is a nonprofit consumer organization with a two-part mission -- consumer information and consumer advocacy. This report focuses on privacy issues related to students and education. http://www.revolutionhealth.com/healthy-living/parenting/top-concerns/technology/healthy-computer-use Add Your Links Here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
  • 24. Area 6: Media bias ISTE Standard IV Area 6 - Media bias This area of ISTE standards addresses how media is used to persuade and convince listeners and viewers to think in particular ways, buy certain products, and otherwise influence behavior. The appropriate response to media bias is teaching students “media literacy,” which involves students in an inquiry process focused on understanding the rationale and mechanics of media persuasion. In addition it helps provide students the critical thinking tools they need to become discriminating consumers of media.
    • Essential questions/thinking points
    • What role can helping students “deconstruct” advertisements and programming in order to understand implied points of view play in your curriculum?
    • What can students learn by creating a short advertisement so they understand how media persuasion works?
    • How can you help students deconstruct why the buy the things they do?
    Helpful links: The Alliance for a Media Literate America. The AMLA is committed to promoting media literacy education that is focused on critical inquiry, learning, and skill-building. This national, grassroots membership organization is a key force in bringing media literacy education to all 60 million students in the United States, their parents, their teachers and others who care about youth: http://www.amlainfo.org/ The New Mexico Media Literacy Project. NMMLP is one of the largest and most successful independent, activist media literacy project in the United States, cultivates critical thinking and activism in our media culture to build healthy and just communities: http://www.nmmlp.org/ Add Your Links Here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
  • 25. Area 7: Personal responsibility, appropriate use ISTE Standard IV Area 7 - Responsibility, appropriate vs. inappropriate technology use This area of ISTE standards is implied all the other area, but this deals directly with issues of personal behavior, including using technology to be rude, unfair, or socially inappropriate.
    • Essential questions/Thinking points
    • Do you have rules for public cell phone use in your school or text messaging in classroom? Are there instances where using these technologies can be acceptable and even helpful?
    • Are you on the look out for a number of unacceptable cyber behaviors, such as cyber bullying, sending inappropriate or mean messages, or accessing adult materials?
    • Do you ask students to avoid “technology overkill” and to avoid using technology for technology’s sake when using traditional methods are more effective or desirable?
    Helpful links: Cyber Bullying. An informational site by the non-profit organization Kidscape. http://www.kidscape.org.uk/childrenteens/cyberbullying.shtml Challenging Cyber Bullying. An informational site by the non-profit Media Awareness Network organization. http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/resources/special_initiatives/wa_resources/wa_shared/backgrounders/challenge_cyber_bullying .cfm Surfing Safely: Discouraging Access to Inappropriate Online Materials, by Jayne Cravens from the Virtual Volunteering Project http://www.youthlearn.org/techno/inappropriate.html Add Your Links Here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
  • 26. Just like Dr. Jason Ohler unpacked iste’s standard
    • Others started investigating this whole idea and coined a new term…Digital Citizenship
  • 27. Why do we care?
    • Chrissy’s Story
    • Even Ellen cares….
    • Surely we should…heck it’s even an outcome
  • 28. Nine Elements Digital Citizenship – an overview Dr. Mike Ribble, Ed. D. Director of Technology Manhattan-Ogden School District miker@manhattan.k12.ks.us
  • 29. Why Digital Citizenship?
    • Some would say we don’t need to teach Digital Citizenship just citizenship as they are one in the same now.
    • Others argue that we need to have a common language and resources that we use with parents, students and teachers.
  • 30. What We Do Know!
    • Digital Citizenship will be constantly changing with the times as new tools are developed and used.
    • As within any society, we need a structure which people need to honor so that we are respectful to each other.
  • 31. Digital Citizenship in the 21 st Century
    • #1 Goal for Digital Citizenship is to teach teachers, students and parents what are the basics of technology issues are today (and help for tomorrow).
    • Provides a Framework using Nine Elements and comes with teaching resources.
  • 32.
    • Digital citizenship is defined
    • as the norms of appropriate,
    • responsible behavior
    • with regard to technology use.
    Nine Elements of Digital Citizenship – an overview
  • 33. Article – Passport to Digitial Citizenship
    • Read the article by Mike Ribble
  • 34.
    • Digital Access
    • Digital Commerce
    • Digital Communication
    • Digital Literacy
    • Digital Etiquette
    • Digital Law
    • Digital Rights and Responsibilities
    • Digital Health and Wellness
    • Digital Security
    Nine Elements of Digital Citizenship
  • 35. full electronic participation in society
  • 36.
    • Do all students have access throughout the day to technology?
    • Do all students have access to technology at home or in the community?
      • Open computer labs
      • After school access in libraries
    • Teachers also need to encourage technology use in their classrooms.
    • Special needs students – required equipment?
    • High speed access as opposed to dial- up.
    Digital Access Definition: Full electronic participation in society.
  • 37. $$ buying and selling online $$ EBAY iTunes Amazon
  • 38.
    • Online purchasing has become an important factor in student’s lives.
    • Students (GEN Y) ages 8-24 now spend $196 billion per year online. (Shop.org, 2006)
    • Students often buy online without understanding the consequences.
      • - Scams, identity theft, viruses, spyware…
      • - Protecting Privacy (credit card info, bank numbers, or personal data to insecure sites.)
    Digital Commerce Definition: The buying and selling of goods online.
  • 39. electronic exchange of information
  • 40.
    • Texting has become the preferred method of communication, how does this change interpersonal communication.
    • Cell phones can be a major distraction in class but some phones allow access to applications and Internet access that could improve learning.
    • How do we teach communication methods in a digital society?
    Digital Communication definition: the electronic exchange of information
  • 41. knowing when and how to use tech
  • 42.
    • Technology infused learning is becoming common place; however, teaching how to use technology appropriately has not kept pace.
    • Instruction on inappropriate and appropriate use has to be taught as well as the technology itself.
    • Teachers need to learn how to create lessons with technology that are engaging.
    Digital Literacy Definition: The capability to use digital technology and knowing when and how to use it.
  • 43. Learning Right from Wrong in the Digital Age Understanding appropriate and inappropriate uses of technology
  • 44.
    • It is our job as educators to model proper digital etiquette so that students understand the subtle and not so subtle rules when using technology.
    • Students need to realize how their use of technology effects others.
    • Examples:
      • Understand that what is said in text or on a social networking site might be seen (and misunderstood) by others.
      • Students need to know when and how to use handheld devices whether their in school or in public settings.
    Digital Etiquette Definition: The standard of conduct expected by other digital technology users.
  • 45. Legal rights and restrictions governing technology use
  • 46.
    • Are students using technology the way that it was intended or are they infringing on the rights of others?
    • Have we taught Copyright procedures in our schools?
    • Examples:
      • Using file sharing sites
      • Pirating software
      • Subverting Digital Rights Management (DRM) tech.
      • Hacking into systems
      • Stealing someone’s identity
    Digital Law The legal rights and restrictions governing technology use.
  • 47.
    • Privileges and freedoms
    • extended to all digital technology users, and the behavioral expectations that come with them
  • 48.
    • Students need to be given a clear understanding of the behavior that is required from them.
    • Examples:
      • Acceptable use policies, terms of use.
      • Using online material ethically, citing sources and requesting permission.
      • Reporting cyberbullies, threats and other inappropriate use.
      • Google – adheres to basic good-citizenship tenets such as “do no harm”
    Rights and Responsibilities The privileges and freedoms extended to all digital technology users, and the behavioral expectations that come with them.
  • 49.
    • The elements of physical and psychological well-being related to digital technology use
  • 50.
    • Examples:
      • Carpel Tunnel Syndrome
      • Eyestrain, poor posture
      • Internet addiction
    Digital Health and Wellness The elements of physical and psychological well-being related to digital technology use.
  • 51.
    • The precautions that all technology users
    • must take to guarantee their personal safety
    • and the security of their network
  • 52.
    • Students need to learn how to protect their data.
      • Virus protection software
      • Firewalls
      • Backups
      • Password- protecting, not sharing, changing, different passwords for different interactions.
      • Https sites
    Digital Security The precautions that all technology users must take to guarantee their personal safety of their network.
  • 53.
    • Protecting hardware and network security
    • Protecting personal security, identity theft, phishing, online stalking.
    • Protecting school security: hackers, viruses
    • Protecting community security: terrorist threats
    Digital Security Issues
  • 54. By embracing technology and encouraging students to explore its various forms, educators also have a responsibility to teach students to use technology in a responsible manner.
  • 55. Let’s take a moment to reflect / jot down some thoughts…
    • Use handout The Elements of Digital Citizenship.
  • 56. Some more exploring….
    • http:// digitaltattoo.ubc.ca /protect/
  • 57. Digital Etiquette Movie
    • http://www.brainpop.com/technology/computersandinternet/digitaletiquette/
  • 58. Everything you need to know about digital citizenship.
    • http://ad4dcss.wikispaces.com/
  • 59. Explore…
    • http:// digitalcitizenship.net/Home_Page.html
    • http://www.ciconline.org/newmedia
    • http://www.nortellearnit.org/technology/Digital_Ethics/
    • http://www.goodworkproject.org/research/digital.htm
    • http://sites.google.com/site/361techcheck/digital-ethics
    • http://its.leesummit.k12.mo.us/digitalethic.htm#Digital_Ethics
    • http://123digitalcitizenship.wikispaces.com/