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Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
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Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
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Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
Agile presentation ONA12
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Agile presentation ONA12
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Agile presentation ONA12

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  • 1. Agile Product Design and Project Management Valentina Powers Director of Digital Operations, NYPR Bryan Young Digital Project Manager, NYPRMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 2. Agenda • The “traditional” project • Traditional becomes Lean, Lean becomes Agile • What is Agile? • What is Scrum? • Real-life applications of Agile • Workshop: using AgileMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 3. I. Before AgileMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 4. “Traditional” Project Management: Waterfall “I believe in this concept, but the implementation described above is risky and invites failure.” - Dr. Winston Royce, creator of WaterfallMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 5. When Waterfall Works • predictable, repeatable, certain processes and requirements • the next step is always known (linear) • ex. accounting, payroll, billing.Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 6. When Waterfall Doesn’t Work • uncertain requirements • change is inevitable • the next step is not known! (non-linear) • ex: strategy, marketing, web, software, most thingsMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 7. From Waterfall to Lean • Lean manufacturing and the modernization of Mass Production • Multi-disciplinary Lean approach: lightweight and Agile Toyota Production Toyota propagates System Dell, IBM adopt The Agile Lean (TPS) is launched lightweight Manifesto 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 8. Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 9. II. What Agile IsMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 10. What is Agile?Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 11. What is Agile? • a non-traditional approach to Project Management that stresses collaboration, flexibility, and quick, iterative cycles of productivity • adapted widely in software development but is multi-disciplinaryMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 12. Who Uses Agile? Technology/Software Investment/Banking Media Education Automotive Retail 12Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 13. What is Agile? • focus is on needs and usability, not requirements • acceptance of failures, learning to adapt • Build - Measure - Learn: create feedback loops • team input is crucialMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 14. What is Agile? • Develop Minimum Viable Products (MVP) • build simple products • reduce goals, add later • learn quickly • prioritize features • if it fails, that’s okay! • more than 60% of software functionality never usedMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 15. The Agile Manifesto We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools; • Working software over comprehensive documentation; • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation; • Responding to change over following a plan.Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 16. 12 Agile Principles • Customer satisfaction by rapid delivery • Welcome changing requirements, even late in development • Working software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months) • Working software is the principal measure of progress • Sustainable development, able to maintain a constant pace • Close, daily co-operation between businessMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 17. 12 Agile Principles • Face-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location) • Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trusted • Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design • Simplicity • Self-organizing teams • Regular adaptation to changing circumstancesMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 18. Why Agile? • Cost of change is minimal • Focus from cost to revenue • Time to market • Better customer satisfaction • Less process, more productsMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 19. Why Agile? • Greater visibility into project progress • Early defect detection/prevention. Catch mistakes early! • Adaptive/flexible: lessons learned at every iteration • Stress is on creating quality products • Improved team moraleMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 20. The downsides (and upsides) of Agile • Need for organizational support / organizational efficiency across the board • Focus on shorter sprints vs. big picture / keep momentum • Change fatigue from users / change is good! • Less documentation / documentation is not the primary vehicle of communicationMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 21. Agile Techniques • Extreme Programming (XP) • DSDM • FDD • Lean • ...and ScrumMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 22. III. ScrumMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 23. Scrum • an Agile project management process stressing collaboration and flexibility • an iterative approach to product development, when requirements are uncertain or constantly changing • a method by which to keep an ongoing dialog between users and creators • scalable to distributed, large and long projectsMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 24. Scrum Roles Scrum Master • manages the process • shields the team from distractions Product Owner • manages the vision, ROI, releases • updates and prioritizes requirements Team • manages the development; commits to results to be achieved • self-organizing and self-managed; determines the best way to deliver the highest priority featuresMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 25. Scrum Terms Sprint • an iteration (or short burst) of work • typically 14 days in duration: deliverables are built Product Backlog • to-do list (list of functionality) for a particular product, managed and prioritized by the client Sprint Backlog • to-do list (list of functionality) for a particular sprint, managed and prioritized by the teamMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 26. Scrum Terms User story • As a <role>, I want <functionality> so that <value or justification>. Daily scrum • daily stand-up Burndown chart • a big picture view of a project PSP / MVPMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 27. What Scrum Looks LikeMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 28. IV. Real-life applications of AgileMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 29. Why Did We Go Agile? • It’s a movement/trend in Software Development with traction • Proven to be successful – 1 in 7 companies using Agile (2005) – NPR and other media companies use Agile • Growing NYPR digital staff with lots of projects • Allows us to move quickly, be innovative, launch better products.Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 30. How We Did It • Co-location If we don’t all sit together, • Training we will fail! • Projects split into releases, releases split into sprints • Daily scrums • Split up into smaller project teams; more developer involvement • Work closer with internal clients & collaborate- more transparencyMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 31. How We Did It • Lessons learned • Integration of feedback loops • Collaborative tools to share information (JIRA, Trello, rapid boards, white boards, etc.) • Use contractors who are known "partners" and have an existing relationshipMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 32. Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 33. RAPID BoardMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 34. Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 35. Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 36. Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 37. How We Did It • Take more risks (failure is OK!) – Allows us to be innovative • Create teams with people who work well together, self-managed teams with generalists (team members wear multiple hats) – Synergy is keyMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 38. In the Works... • Hold internal hackathon, 20% built into sprints: ways developers can explore projects. – Keeps creative juices flowing. • More Prototypes, less comps- – Solve problems before we hit dev • More MVP’s-”minimum viable products” – Simple now, evolve later – Helps us move fasterMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 39. Specifications- On Demand PlayerMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 40. Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 41. In the Works... • Developers blog & feedback forms – Transparency with our users, more feedback loops • More guerilla testing! – Quick feedback at lower costsMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 42. Case study: The Lean Newsroom • Problems: • too many communication channels, not enough accountability • who owns what and how do we know who owned what?Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 43. Case study: The Lean Newsroom • Task: develop a better way to monitor the progress of a story from inception to execution • improve transparency and communication • allow for easy determination of ownership and accountability • reduce wasteMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 44. Case study: The Agile NYPR NewsroomMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 45. How can you be Agile? • Create small, empowered, self-organized teams that can make quick decisions, but keep stakeholders in the loop • Team members made up of generalists: competent and eager to learn • Use existing Agile tools to streamline communication and collaborateMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 46. How can you be Agile? • start simple - don’t overthink - test the waters - think MVP • break down large projects into smaller parts • set goals, not hard requirements • think of your audience’s needs • take risks (it’s okay to fail!)Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 47. How can you be Agile? • learn lessons: “how did we do?” • incorporate feedback loops in subsequent iterations • be quick to respond to change - flexibility is key • get trained!Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 48. Recommended Reading • “Agile Software Development with Scrum” by Ken Schwaber • “Succeeding with Agile: Software Development Using Scrum” by Mike Cohn • “Extreme Programming Explained” by Kent Beck • “Agile and Iterative Development” by Craig Larman • The Scrum Alliance: http:// www.scrumalliance.org/Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 49. Q&A • Questions? • Thoughts? • Feeling nimble?Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 50. and now... • BREAK!!Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 51. V. Activity: Creating a MenuMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 52. Let’s be Agile! Now that you’ve learned what Agile is, let’s put it into practice by creating a menu using Agile techniques. You will... • Be part of an Agile team • Create user stories • Size and prioritize the backlog • Do the sprint • Review / retrospectMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 53. Break into teams! • (4-5 to a team, please.) • Appoint one Scrum Master, one Product Owner + teamMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 54. Choose Your Requirements • Create cover art/brand/logo • Menu layout • Create categories • Provide drink options • Location/map • Set pricing structure • Contact information • Delivery information (minimum and delivery area) • Provide satisfied customer testimonial • Provide ratings (Zagat/Yelp) • Provide hours of operation • Provide photo of the restaurant • Menu material (paper/covering) • Separate delivery/take out menu • Website/digital menu • Daily specialsMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 55. User Stories 20 minutes • Write 3 user stories for each of your requirements for this sprint. • Example: As a customer, I want to be able to see what beverages are available so that I can purchase something to drink with my dinner.Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 56. Size and Prioritize 20 minutes • Do a round of time estimates for items in the backlog, based their relative complexity • Assign a point value to each PBI • Range: 0 (no effort) 1/2 (tiny effort), 2 (small effort), 3 (medium effort), 5 (big effort), 8 (very big effort), 13 (huge effort), 20 (forget about it)Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 57. Sprint 20 minutes • Assign each user story to a team member • Sprint away! • (Incorporate “daily SCRUM” ) - 2 minsMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 58. Now let’s... • BREAK!Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 59. Review • Meeting in which the team demonstrates the work they have completed • Typically 2 hours for each 14 day sprint • Team presentations!Monday, September 24, 2012
  • 60. Retrospective • What went well and what didn’t? How can we improve for next time? • Typically 90 minutes for 2 week sprint • 4 SquareMonday, September 24, 2012
  • 61. Thank you! • Questions for us? • How will you apply it?Monday, September 24, 2012

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