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Bill Bruty

Bill Bruty

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Bill Bruty Opening Speaker Bill Bruty Opening Speaker Presentation Transcript

  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Calling Community Entrepreneurs Bill Bruty Director Fundraising Training Ltd Slide 1
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Bill Bruty Director of Fundraising Training Ltd Bill is a Fellow of the Institute of Fundraising, having been a fundraiser since 1984. He is a world-leading expert in grantseeking and the development of fundraising practise. Clients range from Cancer Research UK, to less mainstream causes; such as the National Union of Students (NUS). Bill has also supported a wide range of community groups and social enterprises across the UK and all over the world, such as International Rivers (US) and The African Field Epidemiology Network, based in Kampala.
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd The Real Face of Enterprise Global Enterprise Monitor (GEM): http://www.gemconsortium.org/ The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) project is an annual assessment of the entrepreneurial activity, aspirations and attitudes of individuals across nearly 100 countries. It was initiated in 1999 as a partnership between London School and Babson College, US. The 2013 survey is set to cover 75% of world population and 89% of world GDP. Slide 2
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Established Business Ownership Rate: “percentage of 18-64 year olds who are currently an owner or manager of an established business” Slide 5
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Established Business Ownership Rate: “percentage of 18-64 year olds who are currently an owner or manager of an established business” Slide 5
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Perceived Opportunities: “percentage of 18-64 year olds who see good opportunities to start a firm in the area where they live.” Slide 5
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Fear of Failure Rate: “percentage of 18-64 year olds who are positive about setting up a business who indicate that fear of failure would prevent them.” Slide 4
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd UK compared with Uganda There is a lot of talk about a new dawn of an ‘enterprise culture in the UK’. Truth is that we’re non-starters in this global race. In 2013 just over 6% of 18-64 year olds in the UK ran their own business. This compares with 36% in Uganda – the world leader in enterprise. So it’s time for the UK to learn from Uganda about being entrepreneurial. Slide 5
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Ugandan Entrepreneurs: Peter Odokonyero Nyeko Slide 4
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Ugandan Entrepreneurs: Peter Odokonyero Nyeko Slide 4
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Ugandan Entrepreneurs: Peter Odokonyero Nyeko Slide 4
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Ugandan Entrepreneurs: Peter Odokonyero Nyeko “People here are prepared to ‘spread their bets’, do very different things at the same time. Everyone has at least two businesses, one for cash (such as a salaried job, or farming) and one for profit (such as transport or selling clothing, jewellery).” “At the outset, I haven’t known anything about the businesses I’ve started. Prior to establishing my 100 hectare farm in Uganda, my only exposure to farming was dabbling with an allotment in Bristol when I was a student.” “I’m the ‘start-up’ specialist. I experiment with new markets, such as buses in Kampala and biofuels. I get in without too much cost, then wait to see if the ‘big boys’ arrive. If they don’t appear, I get out; if they do, I also get out and sell my expertise to them. I could never raise the capital these guys have at their finger tips.” Slide 4
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Ugandan Entrepreneurs: Whitney Grace Najjuko GNAJ By Whitney Gnaj is a Ugandan fashion label founded by Whitney Grace Najjuko, fashion designer and entrepreneur. “It is an Afrocentric label that creates an engagement between African and western fabrics and textiles, driving its inspiration from divergent cultures, architecture and visual arts; going beyond the boundaries of convention.” “I didn’t think about what I could or could not do, I just did what I wanted to do. You have to believe that it is going to be totally awesome, otherwise, why bother?” Slide 4
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd Ugandan Entrepreneurs: Whitney Grace Najjuko GNAJ Fashion Label Slide 4
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd The secrets of Ugandan Enterprise 1.A sense of opportunity – that the future will be better than the past; this underpins a voracious appetite to start up something new. 2.No-one is precious about expertise – they will give anything a go and don’t feel that lack of qualifications, experience or expertise are barriers to starting something up. 3.Often there are no other economic choices; there are few salaried jobs and even if you have one, you need a ‘side business’ as a back-up - to pay for the extras and the unpredictable expenses, such as healthcare. 4.Lack of access or aversion to affordable credit. You’d rather cut back, live with family, to keep costs down that borrow to invest in the business. Therefore there is no financial cost of failure (creditors to pay etc). 5.A complete lack of ‘focus’. People often run very separate activities, one for cash (such as farming) and one for profit (such as transport). There’s no fear of taking on an unfamiliar challenge. You never know what might happen. There’s a delight in the unexpected. Slide 4
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd A final Comparison: Africa and the UK voluntary sector…. "I am made from the same odd pieces as this continent. For better or for worse, Africa's reality is mine. Life here is X-rated and in your face. It can swing from heartbreak to laughter in an instant, sad and hopeful, cruel and kind. It is not for the weak, yet inhabited by the meek. It is humanity simplified, raw and uncut. Things rarely work out the way you want them to, and nothing can be taken for granted. If you can keep the right mental attitude, every day is a divine adventure into the unknown. Good or bad, the moment you start taking it personally, you are doomed." Hendrik "Hendri" Coetzee (c. 1975 – 7 December 2010) was a renowned South African outdoorsman and author. He was killed after being taken by a crocodile in December 2010. Slide 4
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd
  • © Bill Bruty 2011fundraising training ltd