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Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
Ethics in Volunteer Engagement
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Ethics in Volunteer Engagement

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Sometimes it can be difficult to identify when you're facing an ethical dilemma in your work with volunteers. Using volunteer management scenarios and a conversational format, this webinar will cover …

Sometimes it can be difficult to identify when you're facing an ethical dilemma in your work with volunteers. Using volunteer management scenarios and a conversational format, this webinar will cover some of the dilemmas you face when you engage and manage volunteers and provide ideas on how to resolve these situations effectively and ethically.

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  • 1. Walking the Talk of Ethics CCVA 2014 1
  • 2. Ethics Is…  A guide for navigating confusion and conflict  More than a written “code”  Influenced by history, culture, faith, experience  A management tool  Connected to effective leadership CCVA 2014 2
  • 3. Ethical Organizations  Are accessible to diverse groups  Operate ethically with all stakeholders  Strive for excellence  Maintain the public trust  Sustain a helping environment  Are at low risk for legal actions against it CCVA 2014 3
  • 4. Types of Ethics Personal ProfessionalOrganizational CCVA 2014 4
  • 5. Recognizing an Ethical Dilemma  Am I trying to determine the right course of action?  Am I asking a “should” question?  Are values and beliefs involved?  Am I feeling uncomfortable?  Is there a downside to making the “correct” choice? CCVA 2014 5
  • 6. Universal Core Values Six “Pillars of Character”: Citizenship and Philanthropy Respect Responsibility Compassion and Generosity Justice and Fairness Trustworthiness Josephson Institute of Ethics CCVA 2014 6
  • 7. Professional Values and Principles Citizenship and Philanthropy  Personal philosophy of volunteerism  Social responsibility to meet human needs CCVA 2014 7
  • 8. Professional Values and Principles Respect  Self-determination  Mutuality  Human dignity  Privacy  Safeguarding confidential information  Accessibility CCVA 2014 8
  • 9. Professional Values and Principles Responsibility  Staff relationships  Professional responsibility  Diligence  Doing one’s best and perseverance  Continuous Improvement  Self-disclosure and self-restraint CCVA 2014 9
  • 10. Professional Values and Principles Compassion and Generosity  Caring and kindness  Minimal harm to others CCVA 2014 10
  • 11. Professional Values and Principles Justice and Fairness  Procedural fairness  Impartiality  Equity CCVA 2014 11
  • 12. Professional Values and Principles Trustworthiness  Truthfulness and candor  Sincerity/Non-deception  Principled and moral courage  Reasonability & clarity of commitments  Limitations to loyalty  Addressing conflict of interests CCVA 2014 12
  • 13. Real-Life Scenario I  You are Director of Volunteer Services at a residential facility for seniors.  An anonymous note was left on your desk, accusing a volunteer named Ruth of downloading and sharing information about residents.  As far as you know, Ruth does not have access to any confidential files and has very limited computer skills.  However, you am aware that Ruth has a reputation among staff and other volunteers for gossiping about community members during her volunteer shift.  How should you respond to the note? CCVA 2014 13
  • 14. Ethical Decision-Making Steps 1. Identify the facts. Evidence Situational context Multiple perspectives Relevant policies 2. Determine the ethical issue. Which ethical values & principles are involved? Where is the conflict? Who will be most affected by your decision? CCVA 2014 14
  • 15. Ethical Decision-Making Steps 3. Explore the options. Harms and benefits Legal implications Policy implications Connection to organizational mission and values What is the path of least harm? 4. Make a decision and test it. 5. Act, with confidence and courage. CCVA 2014 15
  • 16. Testing Your Decision Consequence Legal Image Culture Knot Source: Gardenswartz, Rowe & Digh for Florida Power Corp.CCVA 2014 16
  • 17. Real-Life Scenario II  You manage a group of 20 volunteers doing trail construction in a state forest.  Volunteers must be housed in congregate living with no individual rooms, shared sleeping and bathroom facilities, and limited privacy.  Alex, a transgender volunteer, expresses concern to you about how others will treat him and his potential exposure to fears, discrimination or prejudice from other workers.  Alex asks to be allowed to stay in a private hotel room nearby. CCVA 2014 17
  • 18. Real-Life Scenario II  You manage a group of 20 volunteers doing trail construction in a state forest.  Volunteers must be housed in congregate living with no individual rooms, shared sleeping and bathroom facilities, and limited privacy.  Alex, a transgender volunteer, expresses concern to you about how others will treat him and his potential exposure to fears, discrimination or prejudice from other workers.  Alex asks to be allowed to stay in a private hotel room nearby. What else do I need to know before deciding what to do? CCVA 2014 18
  • 19. Real-Life Scenario II  You manage a group of 20 volunteers doing trail construction in a state forest.  Volunteers must be housed in congregate living with no individual rooms, shared sleeping and bathroom facilities, and limited privacy.  Alex, a transgender volunteer, expresses concern to you about how others will treat him and his potential exposure to fears, discrimination or prejudice from other workers.  Alex asks to be allowed to stay in a private hotel room nearby. What are some possible courses of action I could take? CCVA 2014 19
  • 20. Real-Life Scenario II  You manage a group of 20 volunteers doing trail construction in a state forest.  Volunteers must be housed in congregate living with no individual rooms, shared sleeping and bathroom facilities, and limited privacy.  Alex, a transgender volunteer, expresses concern to you about how others will treat him and his potential exposure to fears, discrimination or prejudice from other workers.  Alex asks to be allowed to stay in a private hotel room nearby. What might I learn from this situation? How could it be prevented in the future?CCVA 2014 20
  • 21. Ideas for “Exercising” Ethics  Develop or revisit an organizational code of ethics  Discuss ethics at staff and volunteer orientation  Use scenarios as a discussion starter  Focus on each core value at staff or board meetings  Convene a training on ethical decision-making, and practice on examples from fellow professionals  Find colleagues to serve as a “sounding board” CCVA 2014 21
  • 22. Related Resources Independent Sector (sample codes) www.independentsector.org Professional Ethics in Volunteer Administration www.cvacert.org How Good People Make Tough Choices: Resolving the Dilemmas of Ethical Living, by Rushworth M. Kidder Josephson Institute of Ethics www.josephsoninstitute.org CCVA 2014 22
  • 23. Comments from The Ethics of Volunteer Engagement Conversation with  VolunteerMatch and Katie Campbell, CVA   05/06/2014  What else do I need to  know?   What are some possible  courses of action?  How could it be  prevented in the future?  has Alex experienced  discrimination or negativity in  the past?  see if there are other ways  for Alex to become involved  very clearly outline  expectations of housing    does he have specific  concerns about individuals?    would try to keep the team  together­ having one person  in a hotel changes the team  dynamic  I have learned to provide  details repeatedly ­ to  communicate to all  volunteers and to clarify  issues.     Would we be responsible for  paying for the room?  Talk with Alex and offer  another volunteer activity that  he may be more comfortable  in  frequent mentioning of  policies/expectations to  volunteers  is there a group he would feel  comfortable with ?  Provide congregate living for  all volunteers as an option,  also give everyone the option  to stay in a hotel on their  expense.    look into the facilities  available to volunteers and  the effectiveness of these  facilities based on changes  to our communities  Will Alex be singled out as  being provided special  treatment  i would opt to turn alex to  another opportunity that does  not require exceptions    did the group sign some sort  of code of respect as part of  their intake/orientation  process?      Privacy, respect                         

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