Lecture 6-creative strategy-implentation compressed

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  • Relation to Text This slide relates to pages 293-294 of the text and Exhibit 9-2. Summary Overview This show an example of a rational appeal, which focuses on the consumer’s practical, functional, or utilitarian need for the product. Use of this Slide Use this slide to discuss the rational appeal presented by this Red Bull ad, which focuses on the various ingredients contained in the energy drink and the benefits they provide, such as: Enhanced performance Endurance Concentration This particular ad is targeted to college students, and suggests that Red Bull can help you stay awake and alert when studying for exams. Note: This is a good time to show one or more of the Red Bull videos on the accompanying DVD.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to page 295-296 of the text and Figure 9-1. Summary Overview This slide presents the types of personal and/or social-based appeals upon which an ad may be based. Use of this Slide Use this slide to introduce emotional appeals and the various personal feelings on which such advertisements can be based. Emotional appeals relate to the customers’ social and/or psychological need to purchase a product or service. Many feelings or needs can serve as the bases for these appeals, including psychological states or feelings directed to the self, as shown on this slide. Ads using humor, sex, and other appeals that are entertaining, arousing, upbeat, or exciting can affect the emotions of consumers and put them in a favorable frame of mind. Studies show that emotion-based ads are better remembered than are non-emotional messages.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to pages 297-299 of the text and Exhibit 9-7. Summary Overview Use of this Slide Use this slide to point out that, as David Ogilvy and Joel Raphaelson have stated, few purchases of any kind are made for entirely rational reasons. Even a purely functional product, such as laundry soap, could offer the emotional benefit of seeing one’s children in bright, clean clothes. Consumer purchase decisions are often made on the basis of both emotional and rational motives, and attention must be given to both when developing effective advertising. This American Airlines ad was created to show that American can better help flyers navigate through their entire travel experience. The award-winning campaign has helped American connect emotionally with its most valuable customers and increase their brand loyalty.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to pages 298-299 of the text and Figure 9-2. Summary Overview This slide shows the three levels of relationships with brands that occur with emotional bonding. Use of this Slide Use this slide to discuss the concept of emotional bonding with a brand. The McCann Erickson Worldwide advertising agency developed a proprietary research technique known as emotional bonding that assesses how consumers feel about brands and the nature of any emotional rapport they have with them. The three levels of customer/brand relationships are: Product benefits – how consumers think about brands with respect to product benefits. This occurs through a rational learning process. Personality – the consumer assigns a personality to the brand (aggressive, adventurous, timid, etc.). This personality is determined on the basis of cues found in advertising. Emotions – the strongest relationship between brand and consumer and is based on feelings and emotional attachment to the brand.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to pages 299-300 of the text. Summary Overview This slide shows a reminder ad used by Nature Valley. Use of this Slide Use this slide to prompt a discussion of reminder ads, including how and why they are used, and by whom. The objective of reminder advertising is to build brand awareness and/or keep the brand name in front of consumers. Reminder ads are often used by well-known brands and market leaders. This clever ad reminds golfers to carry Nature Valley Granola Bars in their golf bags, because many golfers consume granola and energy bars during a round of golf. Products and services that have a seasonal pattern to their consumption also use reminder advertising.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to page 302 of the text. Summary Overview Creative execution is the way in which an advertising appeal is presented. As shown on this slide, there are a number of ways in which creative specialists can present the advertising message. Use of this Slide This slide can be used to discuss the various options available to advertisers for executing their ads. The slides that follow show some examples of advertisements using several of these techniques.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to pages 302-303 of the text, and Exhibit 9-11. Summary Overview This slide presents a Ford ad that can be used as an example of how straight sell execution is used in advertising to communicate product features and benefits, and appeal to rational purchase motives. Use of this Slide One of the most basic types of creative executions is the straight sell or factual message, which relies on a straightforward presentation of information about a product or service. This type of execution is often used with informational/rational appeals, where the focus of the message is the product or service and its specific attributes and/or benefits. Ford uses a straight-sell execution style in the ad shown on this slide.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to page 303 and Exhibit 9-13 of the text. Summary Overview This slide presents a demonstration ad used by Samsung. Use of this Slide This ad can be used to introduce demonstration advertising, which is designed to illustrate the key advantages of a product or service by showing it in actual use or in some staged situation. TV is particularly well suited for demonstration executions, because the benefits or advantages of the product can be shown right on the screen. This slide shows an ad that Samsung uses to demonstrate the ultra thin feature of their new LED television.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to page 303 and Exhibit 9-13 of the text. Summary Overview This slide presents a demonstration ad used by Samsung. Use of this Slide This ad can be used to introduce demonstration advertising, which is designed to illustrate the key advantages of a product or service by showing it in actual use or in some staged situation. TV is particularly well suited for demonstration executions, because the benefits or advantages of the product can be shown right on the screen. This slide shows an ad that Samsung uses to demonstrate the ultra thin feature of their new LED television.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to pages 304-305 of the text. Summary Overview This slide presents a slice-of-life advertisement for Listerine. Use of this Slide Use this slide to introduce slice-of-life advertising, a widely used advertising format that is generally based on a problem and solution. Slice-of-life ads are often criticized for being unrealistic and irritating to watch because they remind consumers of things such as dandruff, bad breath, body odor, and laundry problems. These ads often come across to consumers as contrived, silly, phony, or even offensive. However, many advertisers still prefer this style because they believe it is effective and presents a situation to which most consumers can relate. Slice-of-death advertising is often used in conjunction with a fear appeal that focuses on the negative consequences that result from not using the product or service. Listerine used a slice-of-life commercial, shown on this slide, to introduce a new Natural Citrus flavor of the popular mouthwash.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to page 305 and Exhibit 9-16 of the text. Summary Overview This slide introduces the use of animation in advertising, including the latest technique, rotoscoping. Use of this Slide Use this slide to introduce animated ads, which have become popular in recent years, especially for commercials targeted to children. Examples would be the Jolly Green Giant and the Keebler elves. Charles Schwab & Co. has been using a technique known as rotoscoping in its commercials. It involves shooting live-action digital videos of actors and then using special software to make them look animated. The technique was effective in drawing attention to the ads and creating an image of the company as being candid and real. The use of animation may increase as creative specialists discover the possibilities of computer-generated graphics and other technological innovations.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to pages 305-306 of the text, and Exhibit 9-17. Summary Overview This slide presents a well-known personality symbol, the Aflak Duck. Use of this Slide Use this slide to introduce personality symbols in advertising, the execution of which involves developing a central character or personality symbol that can both deliver the advertising message and be tied to the product or service. Examples include Mr. Whipple, “Please don’t squeeze the Charmin,” or the Maytag repairman, who sits anxiously by the phone, but is never needed. Personality figures can also be animated characters and animals, such as Morris the cat, Tony the tiger, and Charlie the tuna. Recent personality symbols include the Energizer bunny, the GEICO gecko, and the Aflac duck (shown on this slide). Note: This is a good time to show one or more of the Aflac videos on the accompanying DVD.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to pages 306-307 of the text and Exhibit 9-19. Summary Overview This slide shows a bebe ad, which uses imagery advertising to create a favorable image for the brand. Use of this Slide Use this slide and ad to demonstrate that imagery advertisements consist primarily of visual elements, such as pictures, illustrations, and/or symbols, rather than information. An imagery execution is used when the goal is to encourage consumers to associate the brand with the symbols, characters, and/or situation shown in the ad.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to pages 310-313 of the text. Summary Overview This slide shows the basic components of a print advertisement. Use of this Slide Use this slide to discuss the basic components of a print ad: Headline – words in the leading position of the ad, which are usually read first. May be direct (straightforward and informative) or indirect (questions, provocations, how-to statements, challenges) Subheads – secondary to the main headline, larger than the body copy Body copy – main text portion of the ad, getting the target audience to read this is difficult Visual elements – illustrations, drawings, and photos used to attract attention and communicate ideas or images Layout – physical arrangement of the various components of the ad Once the creative approach, type of appeal, and execution style have been determined, attention turns to the design, implementation, and production of the actual advertisement.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to pages 311-312 of the text and Exhibit 9-22. Summary Overview This slide displays an ad by Volkswagen, which uses an indirect headline to encourage consumers to read the body copy. Use of this Slide Use this slide to point out how companies use an indirect headline to g enerate curiosity or intrigue, so as to motivate readers to read the body copy to find the point of the message . The visual element of this ad is a picture of the car itself. The i ndirect headline, “This car is missing a seat,” is an intriguing statement that hopes to encourage readers to find out why.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to page 313 of the text and Exhibit 9-24. Summary Overview This slide contains a clever ad that uses a clever visual image to deliver a message about the dangers of secondhand smoke. Use of this Slide Use this slide to point out the impact that the right image can have in an ad. It is a strong and meaningful image, reinforced by two simple lines of copy. Would this ad and image have nearly the same impact without the copy?
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to page 313 of the text and Exhibit 9-25. Summary Overview This slide calls out the components of a typical ad. Use of this Slide Use this slide to point out the components of a typical ad. Headline – words in the leading position of the ad, which are usually read first. Subhead – secondary to the main headline, but larger than the body copy Body copy – main text portion of the ad. Getting the target audience to read this is difficult. Visual elements – the illustrations, drawings, and photos, used to attract attention and communicate ideas or images Layout – physical arrangement of the various components of the ad.
  • Relation to Text This slide relates to page 314 of the text. Summary Overview This slide illustrates the interactive elements that must be considered when creating a television commercial. Use of this Slide Use this slide to illustrate that TV is a unique and powerful advertising medium because it contains the elements of sight, motion, and sound, which can be combined in a variety of ways. Unlike print, the viewer does not control the rate at which the message is presented, so there is no opportunity to review points of interest or reread things that were not clear. As with any form of advertising, the first goals in creating TV commercials is to get viewers’ attention, and then hold it. It is important that the video and audio work together to create the right impact and communicate the advertiser’s message. The video elements are what is seen on the screen, including the product, the presenter, action sequences, demonstrations, and so forth. The audio portion includes voices, music, and sound effects.

Transcript

  • 1. Creative Strategy:Implementation and Evaluation Dr. George Belch San Diego State University © 2012 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., McGraw-Hill/Irwin
  • 2. Appeals and Execution Style The approach used to attract the attention of consumersAdvertising Appeals To influence consumer feelings toward a product, service, or cause The way an appeal is turned into an advertising messageExecution Style The way the message is presented to the consumer
  • 3. Informational/Rational Appeals Feature Focus on the dominant product traits Competitive Makes comparisons to other brands Price Makes price offer the dominant point News News announcement about the product Popularity Stresses the brand’s popularity
  • 4. A Popularity Appeal that Focuses on Benefits
  • 5. Appealing to Personal States or Feelings Personal Social-Based Safety Recognition Security Status Fear Respect Love, Affection Involvement Embarrassment Happiness, Joy Affiliation Nostalgia Rejection Sentiment Acceptance Excitement Approval Sorrow, Grief
  • 6. Combining Rational and Emotional Appeals
  • 7. Levels of Relationships With Brands Emotions Personality Product Benefits
  • 8. Reminder Advertising
  • 9. Ad Execution Techniques Straight sell AnimationScientific/Technical Personality Symbol Demonstration Imagery Comparison Dramatization Testimonial Humor Slice of life Combinations
  • 10. Straight Sell or Factual Message
  • 11. Samsung Uses a Demonstration
  • 12. Apple used testimonials to encourage brand switching
  • 13. Slice-of-Life Execution
  • 14. Charles Schwab Uses a Form of Animation
  • 15. Jack is a Personality Symbol
  • 16. Usage Based Imagery
  • 17. Basic Components of Print Advertising Headline Words in the Leading Position of the Ad Subheads Smaller Than the Headline, Larger Than the Copy Body Copy The Main Text Portion of a Print Ad Visual Elements Illustrations Such As Drawings or Photos Layout How Elements Are Blended Into a Finished Ad
  • 18. Use of an Indirect Headline to create couriousity
  • 19. This Ad Uses a Clever Visual Appeal
  • 20. Ad Layout Headline Subhead Visual Element Identifying mark Copy
  • 21. Creative Tactics for TelevisionSight Motion Sound
  • 22. Evaluation Guidelines for Creative Output Consistent with brand’s marketing objectives? Consistent with brand’s advertising objectives? Consistent with creative strategy, objectives? Does it communicate what it’s supposed to? Approach appropriate to target audience? Communicate clear, convincing message? Does execution overwhelm the message? Appropriate to the media environment? Is the advertisement truthful and tasteful?