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Plagiarism

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A presentation on plagiarism aimed at undergraduates, featuring the unicorn.

A presentation on plagiarism aimed at undergraduates, featuring the unicorn.

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  • Here is an example of how plagiarism can have serious consequences. In 2006, Harvard sophomore KaavyaViswanathan received a two-book deal from publisher Little, Brown for her book, “How Opal Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild, and Got a Life.” There was even interest from a film company. However, that all fell apart when Harvard’s student newspaper revealed that the book had more than 40 instances of similar or the same text as two books by Megan McCafferty, Sloppy Firsts and Second Helpings. Look at the example above. The underlined words under Sloppy Firsts are shown in their plagiarized form in bold under Opal Mehta, and you can see that there is both exact wording and close paraphrasing. A representative of McCafferty’s publisher called it “an act of literary identity theft.” Little, Brown eventually recalled all the copies of Opal Mehta and canceled Viswanathan’s contract. Remember- you CAN get caught, and the stakes can be very high.
  • Transcript

    • 1. PLAGIARISMBy Vicky Ludas Orlofsky What It Is, Why Its Bad, and How To Avoid It
    • 2. What is Plagiarism?The uncredited copying of another persons words or ideas. Plagiarism = theft.
    • 3. How much have you really learned if you’re just copying someone else?
    • 4. Plagiarism: An ExampleOriginal text: "The unicorn, one of the most fabulous of all hybrid creatures, has appealed to the imagination as much as the dragon, from the early days of civilization to our own time. Not as old as the dragon, its features are not as ugly or repulsive. ... Its most significant attributes include, first of all, the single horn, which is frequently spiralled, the speed of its action, its solitary habits and the colors ascribed to its body and horn. Like the dragon it is ambivalent in character: it can be very gentle and bestow a number of benefits; it can also be the most ferocious of adversaries." Image from: http://thinkprettythoughts.com/storage/Unic orn.JPG?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION =1286026372497Suhr, E.G. (1964, Summer). An interpretation of the unicorn. Folklore 75(2), 91-109.
    • 5. Copying Without QuotingPlagiarized: The unicorn is as much a part of cultural history as the dragon, but its features are not as ugly or repulsive. Though its physical characteristics remain relatively stable, the single horn being the most obvious, it is ambivalent in character; it can be very gentle or it can be ferocious.
    • 6. How to Fix ItFixed: The unicorn is as much a part of cultural history as the dragon, but Suhr (1964) notes that "its features are not as ugly or repulsive" (91). Though its physical characteristics remain relatively stable, the single horn being the most obvious, "it is ambivalent in character; it can be very gentle or it can be ferocious" (Suhr 1964, 91).
    • 7. Back to the UnicornOriginal text: "The unicorn, one of the most fabulous of all hybrid creatures, has appealed to the imagination as much as the dragon, from the early days of civilization to our own time. Not as old as the dragon, its features are not as ugly or repulsive. ... Its most significant attributes include, first of all, the single horn, which is frequently spiralled, the speed of its action, its solitary habits and the colors ascribed to its body and horn. Like the dragon it is ambivalent in character: it can be very gentle and bestow a number of benefits; it can also be the most ferocious of adversaries." Image from: http://thinkprettythoughts.com/storage/Unic orn.JPG?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION =1286026372497Suhr, E.G. (1964, Summer). An interpretation of the unicorn. Folklore 75(2), 91-109.
    • 8. Copying Ideas or OrganizationPlagiarized: The unicorn, a wondrous beast, has been as fascinating as the dragon, from ancient times to the present. Though the idea of the unicorn is younger than that of the dragon, it is much more appealing in looks, especially the single horn, which is usually a spiral. Similar todragons, it can be either friend or foe.
    • 9. How to Fix ItFixed: Suhr describes how the mythical unicorn has been as fascinating to people as the dragon since it was first devised. Though the idea of the unicorn is younger than that of the dragon, he notes that it has been seen as much more appealing in looks, especially the single, usually spiral horn. He also cites the unicorns ambivalence, similar to that of the dragon, in that it can be either friend or foe (Suhr 1964, 91).
    • 10. Consequences• Mild  Written warning• Severe  Immediate interim suspension, suspension, expulsion, or revocation of a degree
    • 11. Don’t Let This Be You! 2006: KaavyaViswanathan, Harvard sophomore, 2-book deal from Little, Brown Plagiarized!Opal Mehta (2006), page 14: "Priscilla wasmy age and lived two blocks away. For the Sloppy Firsts (2001), page 7: "Bridget is my age andfirst fifteen years of my life, those were the lives across the street. For the first twelve years of myonly qualifications I needed in a best friend. life, these qualifications were all I needed in a best… But that was before freshman year, when friend. But that was before Bridgets braces came offPriscillas glasses came off, and the first in a and her boyfriend Burke got on, before Hope and I metlong string of boyfriends got on” (quoted in in our seventh grade Honors classes” (quoted in ZhouZhou 2006a). 2006a). “an act of literary identity theft” (Steve Ross, quoted in Zhou 2006b)
    • 12. Self-TestAsk yourself: Am I deliberately recalling any particular source of information as I write this paper? Am I consulting any source as I write this paper? (Pratt Institute Student Handbook 2012, 137)
    • 13. How to Avoid ItCite it! • Put quotation marks around exact wording with the author, year, and page number in parentheses: “My cat is furry” (Smith 1999, 23). • Paraphrase ideas while attributing them to their original author, and include the year in parentheses: Smith (1999) said his cat was furry. • Include everything you read or were influenced by in the list of references: Smith, M. (1999). My cat. Journal of Feline Felicities 43(2), 19-34.Chunk it! • "As a general rule, you should not have more than two or three direct quotes per page of writing, and these quotes should be less than four lines of text each." (Plagiarism and the internet, Strayer University 2012) • Do a block quotation for long quotations more than 40 words, but these should be minimal! • Anything more than that should be summarized and paraphrased, and the original source cited.Use Turnitin!
    • 14. ReferencesPratt Institute (2012). Student Handbook 2012. Retrieved 20 October 2012 from http://www.pratt.edu/uploads/5445_student_handbook_2012.pdf.Strayer University (n.d.). Consequences of plagiarism. Retrieved 20 October 2012 from https://icampus.strayer.edu/lrc/plagiarism/consequences.Strayer University (n.d.). Plagiarism. Retrieved 20 October 2012 from https://icampus.strayer.edu/lrc/plagiarism.Suhr, E.G. (1964, Summer). An interpretation of the unicorn. Folklore 75(2), 91-109.Zhou, D. (2006, April 23). Examples of similar passages between Viswanathan’s book and McCafferty’s two novels. Harvard Crimson. Retrieved 22 October 2012 from http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2006/4/23/examples-of-similar-passages-between- viswanathans/.Zhou, D. (2006, April 26). Publisher rejects Soph’s apology. Harvard Crimson. Retrieved 22 October 2012 from http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2006/4/26/publisher-rejects-sophs-apology- the-publisher/.