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Vlorahoti assignment

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    Vlorahoti assignment Vlorahoti assignment Presentation Transcript

    • What are your rights?
      An explanation of rights you have given to Facebook every time you use their service
    • According to Alexa (a company that monitors internet traffic), Facebook is the second most accessed web site in the world.
      (Alexa, 2010)
    • According to Alexa (a company that monitors internet traffic), Facebook is the second most accessed web site in the world.
      (Alexa, 2010)
      According to the Facebook , there are 500 million
      active users of the service.
      (Facebook, 2010)
    • So there’s a good chance you have an account.
    • The terms and conditions that govern your use of Facebook are listed on a “Statement of Rights and Responsibilities”
    • The terms and conditions that govern your use of Facebook are listed on a “Statement of Rights and Responsibilities”
      These can be viewed at www.facebook.com/terms.php
    • It’s not exactly the shortest of documents; there are 18 sections, and almost 4000 words of small print to read through. (In addition, there are a number of other more specific policies).
    • Just by using the service though, you’ve agreed to these terms and conditions.
    • Just by using the service though, you’ve agreed to these terms and conditions.
      (Which were last updated on October 4, 2010).
    • The entire document might not necessarily be relevant to you. You mightn’t give a hoot about the sections relating to payments, advertisers, and application developers...
      So what’s important to the everyday user?
    • Well...
      Here are the main things every user should know.
    • First of all, Facebook reserves the right to change these terms and conditions as often as they like.
    • First of all, Facebook reserves the right to change these terms and conditions as often as they like.
      In fact, you’ve agreed to give them this right.
    • The section titled “Amendments” states:
      “We can change this Statement if we provide you notice (by posting the change on the Facebook Site Governance Page) and an opportunity to comment. To get notice of future changes to this Statement, visit our Facebook Site Governance Page and become a fan”.
      (Facebook, 2010)
    • (So to keep track of any changes that occur to the nature of your agreement with Facebook, you’re best to click on the ‘Like’ button).
    • The next important thing to know relates to your intellectual property... I.e., content such as photos, videos, notes and even status updates that you share.
    • So who owns your content?
    • So who owns your content?
      Well, Facebook aren’t claiming ownership rights to your intellectual property.
      (relieved?)
    • BUT you HAVE agreed to give them a “non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook”.
      Basically, you’ve given Facebook an ‘IP License’.
    • This means....
    • That if Facebook want to, they can give another organisation or individual the right to use your content...
    • That if Facebook want to, they can give another organisation or individual the right to use your content...
      Whether you like it or not.
    • That if Facebook want to, they can use your content to make money...
    • That if Facebook want to, they can use your content to make money...
      And not give you a cent.
    • That Facebook (or any organisation or individual that Facebook has given a sub-licence to) can use your content anywhere in the world.
    • That Facebook (or any organisation or individual that Facebook has given a sub-licence to) can use your content anywhere in the world.
      And they don’t have to tell you about it.
    • Facebook have claimed a specific right to use your profile photo and name too, in connection to the advertisements that appear on the right hand side of your “news feed”.
    • Facebook gives you an option to opt out of this...
    • Facebook gives you an option to opt out of this...
      But you’ll need to change your settings from the default.
    • But unless you’ve been granted permission by making an appropriate payment, you can’t use Facebook for any commercial purposes.
      (So Facebook can associate your photo for free with the advertisements directed towards your friends, but you can’t create advertisements that are specifically targeted towards your friends unless you pay).
    • So where is the line drawn when you want to send a bunch of messages out letting your friends know that your band has a gig at the local pub or a stall at the market over the weekend?
    • You might want to delete your account, but clicking on that delete button is a hard thing to do...
    • You might want to delete your account, but clicking on that delete button is a hard thing to do...
      Especially when you have on average 130 friends.
      (Facebook, 2010)
    • I think it’s safe to assume that you don’t like
      what I’ve told you...
    • So what can you do if you want to protect your content whilst using Facebook?
    • So what can you do if you want to protect your content whilst using Facebook?
      The simple answer is to not share anything whilst using the service.
    • Kind of defeats the purpose of having a Facebook account, doesn’t it?
    • There don’t seem to be any reports of Facebook actively using the IP license you’ve given them.
    • There don’t seem to be any reports of Facebook actively using the IP license you’ve given them.
      So it’s up to you as to whether or not you want to trust them...
    • At least now that you know where your rights stand, you’ll at least be able to make more informed decisions about how you use your account.