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Collection and development plan
Collection and development plan
Collection and development plan
Collection and development plan
Collection and development plan
Collection and development plan
Collection and development plan
Collection and development plan
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Collection and development plan

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  • 1. Velvet FerrariCollection Development Plan AssignmentFRIT 7134 – Spring 2011February 26, 2011DESCRIPTION OF SITE AND LEARNERS I work at East Central Elementary School which is located in Rome, Georgia. It is one ofseven elementary schools in Floyd County. In this school district, there is also one middleschool, one high school, one alternative school, and four private schools. More than 60% of theRome City Schools teachers and administrators hold a Masters, Education specialists, and/orDoctoral degree. At East Central Elementary, there are currently 510 students enrolled. Wehave 38% students who qualify for free lunch and 53% students who qualify for reduced lunch.There are 35 certified teachers, 2 administrators, 23 classified staff members and 1 nurse. Themedia center offers over 14,572 books for children to choose from, with 9,652 of these beingAccelerated Reader titles. This gives the school an average of 28.5 books per student. Themedia center has around 400 titles in its audiovisual collection. Also in the media center is aceiling mounted projector, 10 desktop computers for research, AR, STAR test, and looking upbooks using Safari; 2 VCR/DVD players for showing movies on the closed-circuit channels. Rome, Georgia is located at the center of the Atlanta - Birmingham - Chattanoogatriangle. Known as the "Capital of Northwest Georgia," Rome was recently named the #1 MostLivable City in the Southeast and the #1 Small City with the Best Health Care in the UnitedStates. Floyd County, one of the 50 wealthiest non-metro cities in the United States, is theeconomic hub and medical center of all of Northwest Georgia. Its renowned healthcare facilitiesare home to more physicians per capita than any city in Georgia. More than 150 diverse
  • 2. manufacturers and some of Americas fastest growing high-tech and diverse industries provideRome and Floyd County with a wide range of job opportunities. Ranked 15th in economic strength among all of Georgias counties, Floyd County enjoysa billion dollar retail sales economy and is recognized as the commercial center of NorthwestGeorgia. Undoubtedly, Rome will remain Northwest Georgias economic leader. Quality recreational and cultural opportunities abound. Rome is the 9th ranked tennis cityin the United States. The souths oldest symphony, college and local theatres, arts festivals, andseveral museums add to the rich quality of life that provides families with unique experiences inwhich they may share and further enrich their lives. Twenty-four percent of the population is under the age of 18. Sixty-three percent of thepopulation is white, twenty seven percent is African-American, one percent is Asian, and tenpercent is Hispanic or Latino. Twelve percent of the people do not speak English in their home.Sixty-eight percent of persons age 25 or older are high school graduates. The median householdincome is $30,930, with twenty percent falling below poverty. There are four 2nd grade teachers at East Central Elementary School this year. These fourclassrooms consist of 70 total students with three of the classrooms containing 16 – 19 studentsand the EIP classroom contains 16 students. There are 11 gifted students, three special educationstudents, and eight EIP students mixed within the classrooms. The gifted children are pulled outof class one day a week to meet with the gifted teacher. There are eight ESOL students who arepulled daily for 30 minutes. The ethnic breakdown is as follows: African American: 17 Caucasian: 42 Multi-Racial: 2
  • 3. Hispanic: 8 Asian: 3There are ten children who are pulled daily for direct instructions in reading for thirty minutes.We have two students who are autistic and one who functions on a four year old level. Thesechildren are pulled out by a reading resource teacher daily. The reading level is extremelyvaried. There are 5 students who are reading above a 5th grade level, 17 students who arereading above a 3rd grade level, 35 students on grade level, and 13 students reading below gradelevel.Curriculum Review For this activity, I have chosen to concentrate on the historical understandings ofGeorgia. The following standards are addressed within this unit: SS2H1 The student will read about and describe the lives of historical figures inGeorgia history.a. Identify the contributions made by these historic figures: James Oglethorpe, Tomochichi,and Mary Musgrove (founding of Georgia); Sequoyah (development of a Cherokeealphabet); Jackie Robinson (sports); Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights); Jimmy Carter(leadership and human rights).b. Describe how everyday life of these historical figures is similar to and different fromeveryday life in the present (food, clothing, homes, transportation, communication,recreation, rights, and freedoms).SS2H2 The student will describe the Georgia Creek and Cherokee cultures of the pastin terms of tools, clothing, homes, ways of making a living, and accomplishments.a. Describe the regions in Georgia where the Creeks and Cherokees lived and how thepeople used their local resources.b. Compare and contrast the Georgia Creek and Cherokee cultures of the past to Georgianstoday.SS2G2 The student will describe the cultural and geographic systems associated withthe historical figures in SS2H1 and Georgia’s Creeks and Cherokees.a. Identify specific locations significant to the life and times of each historic figure on apolitical map.
  • 4. B. Describe how place (physical and human characteristics) had an impact on the lives ofeach historic figure.c. Describe how each historic figure adapted to and was influenced by his/her environment.d. Trace examples of travel and movement of these historic figures and their ideas acrosstime. e. Describe how the region in which these historic figures lived affected their livesand compare these regions to the region in which the students live.SS2CG3 The student will give examples of how the historical figures under studydemonstrate the positive citizenship traits of honesty, dependability, liberty,trustworthiness, honor, civility, good sportsmanship, patience, and compassion.SS2E1 The student will explain that because of scarcity, people must make choices andincur opportunity costs.SS2E2 The student will identify ways in which goods and services are allocated (byprice; majority rule; contests; force; sharing; lottery; command; first-come, first-served; personal characteristics; and others).Map Skills: 1,2,3,6,7 Standard Concept Task/Activity Resources SS2H2b Creek and Venn Diagram Books, videos, or Cherokee Students will complete the attached websites about the Indians Venn diagram comparing/contrasting Creek and Cherokee Creek and Cherokee life during Indians Oglethorpe’s time with their own lives. Social Studies book Modifications- Paired working arrangement Series trade books Lined area for writing Dictation of written work United Streaming Check for understanding of videos instructions SS2H2a Creek and Map Social Studies book Cherokee In groups, students will create a map Indian showing the Creek and Cherokee Maps Region regions. Map will include a map key/legend, and compass rose SS2G2bcd Creek and Daily Schedule Books, videos, or Cherokee After becoming aware of the Creek websites about the Indians daily and Cherokee nations, Students will Creek and Cherokee life create a daily schedule of what a Indians typical day in a Creek or Cherokee child’s life would have been like. Social Studies book Students should include chores the child would have been responsible Series trade books for, time for learning/games as
  • 5. appropriate, meals, etc. United Streaming Modifications- videos Dictation of written work Review orally with student prior to writing Check for understanding of directions SS2H1b Creek and First Georgians’ Gazette Books, videos, or SS2H2ab Cherokee (newspaper) websites about the SS2G2acd Indians Students will break into groups and Creek and Cherokee create articles for a class newspaper. Indians In the articles, the students will discuss relevant topics relating to Social Studies book what they have learned about the Creek and Cherokee in Georgia. They Series trade books can also create illustrations to put in their articles. Groups will present their articles to the class. All articles and drawings will be compiled together to form a class newspaper. SS2H1a Sequoyah Sequoyah Bio-Cube Books, videos, or SS2G2 After reading trade books, text books, websites about or other sources about the life of Sequoyah Sequoyah, students can create a Bio- Cube about him and his significance. Social Studies book Teachers could also use an interactive white board to help students complete Series trade books the Bio-Cube as a class. Modifications- Allow partners to work together Model each side of the cube before asking students to complete it independently Assist students with cutting and pasting cube togetherCOLLECTION REVIEW When beginning to review the media center collection for this unit, I started at homewith East Centrals media center. The books in the media center seem to be arranged in anorganized manner. The fiction books are shelved so that every grade level can reach themand they are all housed together on one long wall of the media center. The books and
  • 6. shelves are marked by the author’s last name from A to Z. On the spine of each book is theaccelerated reader level. The non-fiction section takes up the majority of the shelf space.These books are arranged by the Dewey decimal system. The reference books are againstthe far wall in the media center and behind the table used to repair books. This area is notvery user friendly. Not only is it hard for students to get to the book, but there are not anytables for students to work at. With the library housing ten computers that can be used forresearch, the reference section is not used very often. The next step was for me to search our current collection to see which books relate to theunit on the Creek and Cherokee Indians. I was disappointed to find that our media centeronly had twenty-four books and two videos related to my unit. The majority, sixteen, of thebooks cover the Cherokee Indians. I was unable to find any books in Spanish or any otherforeign language. Since these books include the easy, fiction, and non-fiction genres, thesebooks are located in several different areas of the media center. The majority of thesebooks were 10 – 15 years old and in good condition, so this tells me that they are not usedthat much. This makes me wonder if they are just not being used or is it because of theability to do research using computers? Since the number of related titles is so low, itwould make it hard for an entire class to check out books at the same time to do research.This would force the class to working in groups, or some children using the computer. Thebooks that we do have are closely related to the unit and the curriculum. There just isn’tenough.Summary of collection needs: 1. Choose books and other resources that focus on the Creek Indians, Cherokee
  • 7. Indians, James Oglethorpe, Tomochichi, and Sequoyah. Also I need to include Spanish language books. 2. Choose mostly non-fiction and resource books since the current selection is so small. 3. Find more videos about the Creek Indians, Cherokee Indians, James Oglethorpe, Tomochichi, and Sequoyah.BUDGET SUMMARY After much research, I feel as though I have found an adequate list of books and videosthat will greatly benefit our media centers current collection. In order to make this purchase,I will need $3,983.74. I was able to locate resources that represent the Creek Indians,Cherokee Indians, James Oglethorpe, Tomochichi, and Sequoyah. I was also able to locateseveral websites that can be used as resources for this unit of study. I have added these tomy portaportal (www.portaportal.com). See the attached Excel spreadsheet for the specifictitles and monetary breakdown.

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