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Avoiding plagiarism.asu
 

Avoiding plagiarism.asu

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    Avoiding plagiarism.asu Avoiding plagiarism.asu Presentation Transcript

    • Avoiding PlagiarismSafe Practices forAcademic Writing
    • What is Plagiarism? • “The unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as ones own original work.” - "plagiarism." Dictionary.com Unabridged. Random House, Inc. Dictionary.com. Web. 16 Jun. 2010.
    • ASU’s Academic Integrity Code States:• Students attending Appalachian State University agree to abide by the following Code: ▫ Students will not lie, cheat, or steal to gain academic advantage. ▫ Students will oppose every instance of academic dishonesty.• Code Violations include: ▫ Lying ▫ Plagiarism ▫ Unauthorized Assistance ▫ Stealing of Academic Materials ▫ Multiple Submissions without an Instructor’s Consent ▫ Assisting Code Violations  (ASU’s Academic Integrity Code pp. 44-45)
    • ASU Takes Plagiarism Seriously(as do I).• Faculty and Student may agree to: ▫ A reduced grade on the assignment. ▫ A reduced grade for the course. ▫ A grade of F on the assignment. ▫ A grade of F for the course. ▫ Faculty members may require a student found in- violation of the Academic Integrity Code to attend a workshop on academic integrity.
    • Worse-Case Scenario:• The Review Board may impose upon the student: ▫ Probation. ▫ Disciplinary suspension. ▫ Expulsion. ▫ Special programs.  (ASU’s Academic Integrity Code pp. 45-46)
    • What Constitutes Plagiarism?  Buying, stealing, borrowing, or copying an entire paper from the internet or other source  Hiring someone to write your paper for you  “Cutting and pasting” large portions of text without using quotation marks or citing the source  Paraphrasing too closely or changing only a few words in a passage- Cartoon. Pyrczak Publishing, 2001. Robert A. Harris. The Plagiarism  Using someone else’s idea withoutHandbook: Strategies for Preventing, Detecting, and Dealing withPlagiarism. Pyrczak Publishing, 2002. AntiPlagairism.com. 6 giving proper credit, even if youMar, 2002. Web. 16 June, 2010. develop your own idea from his
    • How do I Avoid Plagiarism?• The key to avoiding plagiarism is to be certain that you give credit where credit is due. This includes the use of someone else’s words, ideas, pictures, data, statistics, and research. - Gold Skeleton Key Clipart. clipartof.com. nd. Web. 16 June, 2010.
    • What Should be Cited? • Words or ideas presented in any medium, including magazines, books, newspapers, songs, TV programs, movies, Web pages, computer programs, letters, advertisements, etc. • Information you gain through interviewing or conversing with another person, face to face, over the phone, or in writing • When you copy the exact words or a unique phrase, reprint any diagrams, illustrations, charts, pictures, or other visual materials • When you reuse or repost any electronically-available media, including images, audio, video, or other media - Stolley, Karl and Allen Brizee. “Is It Plagiarism Yet?”- “Frustrated.” Cartoon. Healeylibrary. wikispaces.com. Purdue Online Writing Lab. Purdue University. 21 Apr.nd. Web. 16 June, 2010. 2010. Web. 16 June, 2010.
    • What Should NOT be Cited?• Writing about your own ideas, personal experiences, and conclusions about a topic• When you are writing up your own results obtained through lab or field experiments• When you use your own artwork, digital photographs, video, audio• When you are using "common knowledge," things like folklore, common sense observations, myths, urban legends, and historical events. Generally speaking, you can regard something as common knowledge if you find the same information undocumented in at least five - Icon. ICONS etc. credible sources. mysitemyway.com. nd. Web. 16 June, 2010.• When you are using generally-accepted facts, e.g., pollution is bad for the environment - Stolley, Karl and Allen Brizee. “Is It Plagiarism Yet?” Purdue Online Writing Lab. Purdue University. 21 Apr. 2010. Web. 16 June, 2010.
    • What should I do if I am unsure?• When in doubt, ask your instructor or consult a reputable website like these: ▫ The Online Writing Lab at Purdue University  http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/02/ ▫ The Writing Center at ASU http://writingcenter.appstate.edu/
    • Any questions?• Write on… - Wise, Diane. Illustration. Wordpress.com. nd. Web. 16 June, 2010.
    • Works Cited“Academic Integrity Code” ASU Student Handbook. Pp. 44-46.Cartoon. Pyrczak Publishing, 2001. Robert A. Harris. The Plagiarism Handbook: Strategies for Preventing, Detecting, and Dealing with Plagiarism. Pyrczak Publishing, 2002. AntiPlagairism.com. 6 Mar, 2002. Web. 16 June, 2010.“Frustrated.” Cartoon. Healeylibrary. wikispaces.com. nd. Web. 16 June, 2010.Gold Skeleton Key Clipart. clipartof.com. nd. Web. 16 June, 2010.Icon. ICONS etc. mysitemyway.com. nd. Web. 16 June, 2010."plagiarism." Dictionary.com Unabridged. Random House, Inc. Dictionary.com. Web. 16 Jun. 2010.Stolley, Karl and Allen Brizee. “Is It Plagiarism Yet?” Purdue Online Writing Lab. Purdue University. 21 Apr. 2010. Web. 16 June, 2010.The Online Writing Lab at Purdue University. Purdue University. 21 Apr. 2010. Web. 16 June, 2010.The Writing Center. Appalachian State University. Web. 20 May, 2012.Wise, Diane. Illustration. Wordpress.com. nd. Web. 16 June, 2010.