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Teenage Health predicts the future health of the society. COnsidering that, statistics donot favour a very healthy future ! Have a look at this presentation.

Teenage Health predicts the future health of the society. COnsidering that, statistics donot favour a very healthy future ! Have a look at this presentation.

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Teenager  heart of the matter Teenager heart of the matter Presentation Transcript

  • TEENAGERS HEART OF THE MATTER
    Dr. Vikas Kohli MD FAAP FACC
    AMERICAN BOARD CERTIFIED
    SENIOR CONSULTANT
    PEDS CARDIOLOGY
    INDRAPRASTHA APOLLO HOSPITAL
  • HOW MANY ADULTS IN THIS ROOM …..
    WILL NOT HAVE A HEART ATTACK IN THE NEXT 10 YEARS ?
    SIMILARLY, WILL YOUR TEENAGE CHILD OR GRANDCHILD NOT HAVE A HEART ATTACK BEFORE HE/SHE IS 45 YRS OF AGE ?
    ARE WE DOING ENOUGH OR HEADING STRAIGHT THERE ?
  • OBESITY IN CHILDREN
  • Adolescent Overweight and Future AdultCoronary Heart Disease
    New England Journal of Medicine
    2007
  • OBESE TEENAGERS BECOME OBESE ADULTS
    Study from California:
    Based on statistics and current obesity rates, by 2020:
    37% males and 44% females would be obese when they are 35 yrs
    This is based on overweight adolescents in 2000 in USA
    This would add 19% extra load of heart patients
  • "Today's adolescents are the young adults of tomorrow -- young adults who would ordinarily be working, raising their families, and not worried about heart disease until they are much older.”
  • But actually majority of them would be spending a lot of time in hospitalizations and treatment and with medications before they turn 50.
    Eighty percent of overweight adolescents become obese adults
  • Indian Children
    13–18 years (n=4700, M:F 2382:2318) were studied. Body mass index (BMI) was measured. Data on physical activity, food habits, occupation of parents and their economic status, birth weight of the children and age at menarche
    prevalence of overweight was 17.8% for boys and 15.8% for girls
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice2002
  • Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 2008
  • Factors influencing Obesity
    Birth Weight
    Life Style Index
    Diet
    Parental Obesity
    Activity Level
    Time on Computer/TV
    Snacking
  • PREVELANCE OF OBESITY
    childhood obesity varies from over 30% in
    USA
    Less than 2% in sub- Saharan Africa.
    20% in U K and Australia
    15.8% in Saudi Arabia
    15.6% in Thailand, 10% in Japan
    6.2% in Chennai, 7.4% in New Delhi
  • Hypertension and Obesity
    Incidence of HTN in Obese kids is 17% vs in 10% of normal kids
    The 10% in a particular study appears very high
  • HEART PROBLEMS AT YOUNG AGE
  • How common is fat deposition
    This study demonstrates that coronary atherosclerosis begins at a young age and that
    lesions are present in 1 of 6 teenagers. These findings suggest the need for intensive efforts at coronary disease prevention in young adults.
  • What is Fat deposition
  • General Comments
    Arteriosclerosis
    Thickening and loss of elasticity of arterial walls
    Hardening of the arteries
    Greatest morbidity and mortality of all human diseases via
    Narrowing
    Weakening
  • 18
    ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUE
    NORMAL ARTERY
    ATHEROSCLEROTIC
    PLAQUE
  • Non-Modifiable Risk Factors
    Age
    A dominant influence
    Atherosclerosis begins in the young, but does not precipitate organ injury until later in life
    Gender
    Men more prone than women, but by age 60-70 about equal frequency
    Family History
    Familial cluster of risk factors
    Genetic differences
  • Modifiable Risk Factors(potentially controllable)
    Hyperlipidemia
    Hypertension
    Cigarette smoking
    Diabetes Mellitus
    Elevated Homocysteine
    Factors that affect hemostasis and thrombosis
    Infections: Herpes virus; Chlamydia pneumoniae
    Obesity, sedentary lifestyle, stress
  • Normal Artery
  •                                                                                                      
                                                   
  • Response to Injury
  • Endothelial Dysfunction
  • Initiation of Fatty Streak
  • Fatty Streak
  • Fibro-fatty Atheroma
  • Fatty Streak-Aorta
  • Fatty Streak-Coronary Artery
  • Normal Artery
  • Unstable angina with plaque disruption
    The plaque cap is torn,
    projects into the lumen, exposing a mass of thrombus filling the lipid core
    used with permission from
    M.J. Davies
    Atlas of Coronary Artery Disease 1998
    Lippincott-Raven Publishers
  • WHY THIS IS HAPPENING
  • Life Style
    Diet
    Exercise
    TV
    Snacking
    Computer
    Lack of urban planning
    Peer group
  • ROLE OF FAMILY
  • Primary Role
    Estab right dietary habits
    Exercise as a part of life
    Be a role Model
    Decrease In House time: spend time at Sports complexes
  • ROLE OF SCHOOL
  • Peer Group & Social Impact
    This is where they see and decide complex things in their life
    They also listen to teachers differently as compared to parents
    Exercise and good health a routine
    REMOVING ACADEMIC PRESSURE
  • ROLE OF DOCTOR
  • GUIDING
    Main role is to guide
    Dietary Implications of Protein VS Carbs Vs. Fat
    Early Assessment and Sounding the Alarm
  • ROLE OF MEDIA
  • RESPONSIBLE
    They carry responsibility of not drilling into heads of kids the great value of Junk Food
    They should understand the implications of advertisements
  • WHAT ARE OTHER COUNTRIES DOING ABOUT IT
  • LETS MOVE
  • Active Families: Engage in physical activity each day : a total of 60 minutes for children, 30 minutes for adults.
    Active Schools: A variety of opportunities are available for schools to add more physical activity into the school day, including additional physical education classes, before–and afterschool programs, recess, and opening school facilities for student and family recreation in the late afternoon and evening.
    Active Communities: Mayors and community leaders can promote physical fitness by working to increase safe routes for kids to walk and ride to school; by revitalizing parks, playgrounds, and community centers; and by providing fun and affordable sports and fitness programs.
  • Lets Move
    Healthy Moms
    Healthy Communities
    Healthy Families
    Healthy Schools
  • WHAT CAN WE DO IT FOR OUR KIDS
  • OURSELVES
    EDUCATE OURSLEVES MORE ABOUT DIET AND EXERCISE RELATED ISSUES
  • AT HOME
    IMPROVE DIETARY HABITS
    INCREASE SPORTS AND ACTIVITY
    DECREASE TV AND COMPUTER TIME
    DON’T BUY OR ALLOW KIDS TO BUY SNACKS
  • AT SCHOOL
    MAKE HEALTHY FOOD AVAILABLE AT SCHOOL
    INCREASE ACTIVITY/SPORTS INVOLVEMENT
    DECREASE ACADEMIC PRESSURE
  • AT COMMUNITY LEVEL
    INCREASE AVAILABILITY OF SPORTS COMPLEXES
    MAKE MALLS PLACES WHERE MORE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IS INVOLVED
    DIETARY HAZARD FOODS WITH WARNING AND LABEL
  • WE CAN DO IT
    THANK YOU