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Australian values unit
 

Australian values unit

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A Year 11 Preliminary ESL unit of work on Australian values.

A Year 11 Preliminary ESL unit of work on Australian values.

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    Australian values unit Australian values unit Presentation Transcript

    •   AUSTRALIAN VALUES   PRELIMINARY HSC English ESL  
    • Yr 11 ESL Program and Register 2013 Module: Australian Values Unit Statement English (ESL) is designed for students to increase their expertise in English in order to enhance their personal, social, academic and vocational lives. Students learn to respond to and compose a wide variety of texts in a range of situations in order to be effective, creative and confident communicators. In this unit, students will explore the ways in which composers use the conventions of narrative and film to tell a story. In their responding and composing students study how these conventions are used to present certain values. Students will examine the core text, Australia in addition to the related text The Rabbits to explore the conventions of narrative and film to portray Australian values. Texts: Core text: Australia – Baz Luhrmann Related text: The Rabbits, Marsden &Tan; Other texts: Aesop’s fables. Bombing of Darwin feature article, 1942. Key competencies: § Communicating ideas and information § Working with others in groups § Using technology Outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 1. A student demonstrates and understanding of the relationships between composer, responder, text and context 2. A student identifies and describes relationships among texts 3. A student demonstrates understanding of cultural reference in texts 4. A student develops language relevant to the study of English. 5. A student demonstrates understanding of how audience and purpose affect the language and structure of texts. 6. A student interprets texts using key language patterns and structural features. 7. A student identifies the ways different technologies and media of production affect the language and structure of particular texts 8. A student uses a variety of textual forms appropriately for different purposes, audiences and contexts, in all modes. 9. A student engages with a wide range of texts to develop a considered and informed personal response 10. A student assesses the appropriateness of a range of processes and technologies in the investigation and organisation of information and ideas. 11. A student analyses and synthesises information and ideas from a range of texts in a range of modes and media. 12. A student draws upon the imagination to transform experience into text. 13. A student reflects on own processes of composing and responding 14. A student reflects on own processes of learning English Time allocation: 4 weeks (Term 3) Assessment of Learning: Task 3 Viewing/representing and Speaking 20% (Speech or imovie with voice-over) Outcomes: 1,4,5,6,11 Assessment for Learning: Ongoing. Classwork: individual, pair, group and whole class work; discussions, viewing, listening, reading and writing Cross Curricular Content: Difference & diversity, Aboriginality, modern Australian history, ICT. Literacy: focus on: § Film techniques – metalanguage § Conventions of narrative § Nominalization § Paragraph structure: cohesion and cohesiveness. Variations Teacher: Viviana Mattiello
    • Teacher Evaluation: Content. Activities: Additions/ Modifications/Variations. Evaluation of Assessment: Student response to teaching, learning and assessment experiences:
    • Teaching and Learning Activities Resources Outcomes Evidence of Learning Feedback Reg WEEK 1 Lesson 1+2 Listening exam feedback. Lesson 3+4 Introduction to the Narrative genre 1. Teacher shares a popular story with students (i.e. Cinderella) 2. Class discussion: • When do we use this type of story and with whom? • Why do people tell this type of story? • What are the main narrative features of this type of story and why? 3. Group discussion. Students complete the Telling stories discussion worksheet. In groups students should attempt to decide whether statement are True/False giving reasons to support their decisions. 4. Each group shares their answers and justify them. “The Rabbits” analysis Students read The Rabbits silently. 1. Provide focus questions before reading and explain how students should approach reading the text. 2. Students discuss initial response to the narrative. 3. Teacher reads The Rabbits aloud. 4. Students share their individual observations and link discussion back to the focus questions, highlighting the way the elements of narrative are used. 5. Discussion questions: • What is the narrative structure? Feedback resources can be found here and here Homework: Students write a summary of the “narrative elements and techniques” sheet to handout for marking next class in preparation for related text analysis. Students also revise key visual analysis features through this slideshare 1 Statements about Telling Stories worksheet The Rabbits ESL 4.1 Contribute information and ideas in group tasks and classroom discussions Syllabus 4. Students learn the language relevant to their study of English including: 4.1 its terminology 4.2 language for making connections, questioning, affirming, challenging, speculating and generalising ESL 5.1 A student communicates in familiar social and classroom situations, extracting relevant information from spoken English and elaborating on some ideas in coherent speech. ESL 5.8 Incorporate new vocabulary from texts into personal vocabulary (specialised terminology) 1. Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationships between composer, responder, text and context 1.1 identifying and describing the Students negotiate the meaning of each question and take a stance on each answer. Students participate in group discussion, giving reasons to support their opinions Teacher/class oral feedback Students provide oral feedback to each other 1 Please note that students will upload ALL work to their personal blogs once they have been given written feedback in order to maintain their personal portfolio in an online environment. Students are also required to comment on each other’s work.
    • • In what ways is the story an allegory? (Teacher can provide an example of an allegory) • Does this remind you of other texts that your have read or viewed? • What language is used? Consider: specific word choice, verbs, sentence structure, formal/informal language, omission of voices and connotations. 6. As a class, we will explore specific images in the book and identify visual techniques. Students will attempt to write an analytical paragraph following the model in the keynote presentation. This skill will be revisited and consolidated next class. WEEK 2 Lesson 1+2 “The Rabbits” consolidation & Link to Australian values 1. Warmer: on the board, students brainstorm what they thought Australia was like before living in Sydney. Stereotypical ideas about Australia are discussed and explored. What is Australia like in reality? Students again brainstorm on the board their ideas. Teacher will make an explicit link to Australian values orally. 2. In groups, students attempt to complete the Rabbits analysis table. 3. On the projector screen, teacher writes some of answers elicited from groups. There is a distinct focus on setting, themes, characterization, point of view and dialogue. Additionally, the use of visual techniques to advance the plot and represent certain values will be discussed. 4. Students are introduced to the S.E.X.Y.L. paragraph structure through discussing the model paragraph. Students will refer back to this paragraph as they do their own writing. 5. Australian values: Students read the Department of Immigration and Citizenship’s Australian values factsheet. Students jot them down and discuss meanings. 6. In pairs, students choose ONE Australian value and write an analytical paragraph of how this value is softback copies for each student. The Rabbits keynote Homework: Students have an initial opportunity to write an analytical paragraph on how narrative and visual techniques. The Rabbits analysis table The Rabbits model paragraph Dept of Immigration factsheet Homework: Students complete contexts of responding to and composing particular texts. 1.4 recognizing the effect of language experiences and culture on responding to and composing texts. 14. Students reflect on own processes of learning of English by 14.4 writing ESL 5.6: Identify main events and supporting detail in a narrative text. 4. Students learn the language relevant to their study of English including: 4.1 its terminology 8. Students use a variety of textual forms appropriately for different purposes, audience and contexts in all modes by 8.1 identifying and describing a variety of language forms and features and structures of particular texts in personal, social, historical and workplace contexts Students compose an analytical paragraph to demonstrate their understanding of the text and the conventions used by composers to create meaning. Students compose an analytical paragraph to demonstrate their understanding of the text and the conventions used by composers to create meaning. Oral feedback Teacher written feedback Oral feedback Oral feedback Written feedback
    • presented in The Rabbits. Students hand in their paragraphs in class. – If time runs out, they will be able to complete it as homework. Lessons 3+4 Telling stories in the medium of film Key concept: Stories use the codes and conventions of narrative differently according to the mode and medium of storytelling. 1. Teacher brainstorms the similarities and differences found in film compared with picture books, anecdotes and other forms of storytelling. What impact do the similarities and differences in the mode and medium have on the way the story is told? 2. Teacher introduces: Revising film techniques keynote. 3. Students play a competition game on the board. Teacher gives a definition of a film technique and students write the terminology on the board. The student who writes the term correctly first gets a point. Winner is the student with the most points. Introduction to Baz Luhrmann’s ‘Australia’ film Pre-viewing activities Key concept: That meaning is influenced by the cultural and historical context in which texts are set and composed. 1. Students are provided with some images and guiding questions on the film. Students answer them working in pairs. (Australia study guide IFI Education) 2. Teacher shows the class the DVD cover of the film. Teacher elicits ideas on what the film might be about (themes), links to Australian values and allows students to identify some visual features. 3. Historical background: Teacher introduces students to the film’s historical background. Students research the bombing of Darwin through a web-link and an archived newspaper article from February 1942. Students answer questions in page 2 4. Feature article deconstruction: Teacher points the second analytical paragraph. Revising film techniques keynote Australia study guide – Page 1, Activity 1 Australia DVD Cover Darwin Bombing 1942 feature article Feature Article keynote ESL 5.8 Incorporate new vocabulary from texts into personal vocabulary (specialised terminology) 2. Student identify and describe relationships among texts: 2.1 identifying similarities in differences between texts 5. Students learn to understand how audience and purpose affect the language and structure of texts by: 5.1 identifying the language features and structures of texts composed for different audiences and purposes. 5.2 composing texts for specific purposes and audiences. 6. Students interpret texts using key language patterns and structural features by: 6.1 Identifying key words and phrases of a text 6.4 Identifying and using appropriate syntax. ESL 5.1 Communicates in a familiar social and classroom situations, extracting relevant information from spoken English and elaborating on some ideas in coherent speech. ESL 5.6 Reads with understanding a range of texts, including those remote from personal experience, interpreting mainly at a literal level and using the information for other Students identify film techniques terminology through recalling them and using them in the game. Students are confident in analysing the DVD cover. Oral feedback Teacher Written feedback
    • out certain language and structural features used in feature articles. Students revise the purpose and structure of feature articles through the Feature article keynote WEEK 3 Lessons 1+2 Viewing Australia 1. Prior to viewing, students complete a brief pre-test of their current knowledge of film techniques. Students access online quiz. 2. Class starts watching the film. Opening scenes – Teacher leads a discussion of film and sound techniques in the opening sequence. Class consider what hooks the responder? How is Australia depicted? 3. Play the opening sequence twice to observe and then note techniques used. Discuss the effect on the responder. 4. Teacher shows the model analysis table for Australia’s opening scene (similar to a viewing log) on the screen. 5. Continue viewing focusing on plot and personal responses during viewing. Lessons 3+4 Viewing and personal response to the film Key concept: That films engage us and promote our involvement in a range of ways that differ from stories in other modes and mediums. Students complete their first watching of the film. Students summarize the first part of the study guide (pages 2-8) and start answering the Metro magazine study guide questions (pages 11-14) Note: Questions will be numbered to allow students to answer some questions only. The answers to these questions will be submitted in writing for marking. (Teacher is expected to be away this day on Professional Learning conference) Lessons 3+4 Homework: Students write a feature article using quotes from informal interviews carried out among MLC students using the question: What does being Australian mean for MLC students? Online quiz Opening Scene Model Analysis table “Australia study guide” by Metro Magazine. purposes. ESL 5.11 Writes a number of coherent texts, demonstrating some flexibility and control over key organisational and language features. ESL 5.3 Student shows understanding of spoken English, cueing into key organisational and language features… 7. Student describe the ways different technologies and media of production affect the language and structure of particular texts: 7.1 responding to text produced by a range of technologies 9. Students engage with a wide range of texts to develop a considered and informed personal response by: 9.2 Relating responses to aspects of human experience 9.5 discussing and reflecting on the wider issues arising from their engagement with texts. 3. Student demonstrates understanding of cultural reference in texts by: 3.3 identifying a range of culturally based values and perspectives in texts 3.4 showing understanding of some key cultural attitudes, beliefs and values underlying issues and language in texts. ESL 5.8 Applies basic text access strategies to enhance comprehension and learning. 5. Students demonstrate understanding of how audience and purpose affect the language and structure of texts by 5.1identifying the language features and structures of texts composed for different audiences and purposes 8. Students use a variety of textual forms appropriately for different purposes, audiences and contexts in Students compose an acceptable feature article using relevant language and structural features as well as showing evidence of personal research and interview processes to comment on Australian values. Students obtain a positive score in the quiz. Instant online feedback
    • 1. Students are asked on their personal response to film. Did you like the film? Why/why not? 2. Students share some of their answers with their peers to check their understanding. Pairs share their answers to the class. 3. Plot-sequencing activity: Students cut out and order sentences as they happen in the film. 4. Narrative structure in the film. As a follow-up activity, students write some of those sentences over a narrative structure graphic and also compose a paragraph on what narrative structure the film follows (this paragraph might be jointly constructed if necessary) WEEK 4 Lesson 1+2 1. Dictogloss Activity: Students listen to a short film synopsis of the film and construct it in pairs. 2. Themes discussion: Class will explore various themes in Australia using the IFI Australia Study guide pages 2,4 and 5 (themes include Love, Aboriginal Australia, Stolen Generations, etc). 3. Guided activity: Teacher reads and class completes study guide questions. Students are paired according to questions directions. 4. Extension Task: What is the significance of the song “Over the rainbow” to the plot and themes of the film “Australia”? Justify your answer with textual evidence. 5. Class brainstorm: Students identify Australian values depicted in the movie (Students are reminded of some of the values discussed in Week 2) Lesson 3+4: Close study of the film Key concept: That films are constructed to promote viewer involvement and response. 1. Australian Values: Teacher leads a discussion on how Australian Values are presented in the film. 2. Guided practice: Teacher guides students into how a specific scene is analysed. Teacher deconstructs and analyses the “cattle rush” scene and completes all sections of the analysis table with the class. Australia Study guide by Metro Plot and narrative structure worksheet Dictogloss activity Australia study guide Homework: Students complete questions on the “Film Studies” section of the study guide. – Students may also complete the Extension Task. all modes by 8.1 identifying the effects of language forms and features and the structures of particular texts. 9. Students engage with a wide range of texts to develop a considered and informed personal response by 9.3 composing personal responses to individual texts and groups of texts considering the responses of others 11 Students analyse and synthesise information and ideas from a range of texts in a range of modes and media by 11.3 synthesising information and ideas. 3. Student demonstrates understanding of cultural reference in texts by 3.3 identifying a range of culturally based values and perspectives in texts. 3.4 showing understanding of some key cultural attitudes, beliefs and values underlying issues and language in texts. 6. Students interpret texts using key language patterns and structural features by 6.1 identifying key words and phrases of a text 6.4 identifying and using appropriate syntax 14. Students reflects on their own processes of learning English by 14.3 comparing their own learning processes with those of others. ESL 5.7 Student interprets texts, cueing into key organisational and language (film) features. 7. Students describe the ways different technologies and media of production affect the language and structure of particular texts Students answer questions correctly. Students sequence the plot’s scenes correctly. Students reconstruct the text satisfactorily. Students work in pairs effectively and answer the study guide’s questions satisfactorily. Teacher written feedback and peer-feedback on next lesson Teacher & Peer oral feedback Teacher written feedback / student self- reflection Teacher oral feedback Teacher/peer feedback
    • There will be an explicit focus on Film and narrative techniques. This is the second time students see a similar table in this unit and should feel more confident with undertaking their own analysis. 3. Class watches the “cattle delivery in Darwin” scene and teacher briefly discusses Australian values in this scene. Students work in pairs and analyse this scene using the analysis table. Pairs present this analysis to the class. Teacher and Peers give groups feedback on their analysis. Students are expected to complete this table in class time. 4. Students hand this in using dropbox on Schoology. WEEK 5 Lesson 1+2 1. Teacher gives oral feedback to students on how effective their analysis was in their homework responses and reviews how Australian values are presented in the film. Students are instructed to use their own copy of the film at this point. 2. Students work in pairs and find various quotes and film techniques from the film that match a certain Australian value. Note: Access to this worksheet will only be given electronically as its is expected that students find a good range of techniques so the word document will only be provided so they are able to adjust their number of rows accordingly. Lesson 3+4 Writing analysis of selected scenes Key concept: That effective analysis of texts requires the analysis of the effects of textual devices and the provision of detailed and appropriate textual evidence. 1. Writing: Joint construction of a paragraph analysing one of the focus scenes using the S.E.X.Y.(L.) structure (preferably the same scene that was analysed as a whole class) in Word . Students are also directed to the “verbs of analysis” Cattle rush scene analysis table Cattle delivery scene analysis table Homework: Students complete the analysis and hand it in. Also, students are instructed to watch the films again as we will continue analysing how Australian values are presented in the film. Australian values worksheet- Accessed through Schoology only Ear/headphones to re-watch specific sections of the movie. S.E.X.Y.L structure 7.2 Identifying and describing the effects of technological forms and conventions on meaning in personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace contexts. 11. Students analyse and synthesise information and ideas from a range of texts in a range of modes and media by 11.4 developing and presenting information and ideas in texts in a range of modes and media and in analytic, expressive and imaginative ways. 5. Students demonstrate understanding of how audience and purpose affect the language and structure of texts by 5.1 Identifying the language features and structures of texts composed for different audiences and purposes. 7. Students describe the ways different technologies and media of production affect the language and structure of particular texts 7.1 responding to texts produced by a range of technologies 7.2 Identifying and describing the effects of technological forms and conventions on meaning in personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace contexts 4. Students develop language relevant to the study of English including: 4.1 its terminology 4.2 language for making connections, questioning, affirming, challenging, speculating and generalising 5. Student demonstrates understanding of how audience and purpose affect the language and Students work in pairs effectively and complete the analysis table correctly. Students can identify techniques appropriately Students complete the analysis table correctly. Students can identify techniques appropriately Students write an analytical paragraph following S.E.X.Y.L structure Teacher/peer oral feedback Teacher written feedback
    • sheet and are required to use a variety of them in their paragraphs. Language focus: Using analytical language with focus on verb form. 2. Topic sentences development: As a class, we will brainstorm a number of possible topic sentences discussing how Australian values are presented in the movie. This will facilitate students’ understanding of how to write using the S.E.X.Y.L structure effectively. Also, utilizing word will allow the teacher to highlight those structural elements in different colours as a strategy for organizational mastery. 3. Students choose to focus on ONE Australian value depicted in the movie and write analysis on another scene in pairs. WEEK 6 Lessons 1+2 1. Peer editing: Students are given a copy of their peers’ paragraph work and they engage in highlighting parts of the paragraph for ensuring structural effectiveness and also appropriateness of textual evidence to support topic sentences. 2. Introduction to the Speech text type: Teacher elicits current knowledge of the Speech text type (students should have some understanding of this and of spoken language features as we studied this last term). 3. Text deconstruction: Teacher will show the class an annotated sample of a speech and deconstruct it orally. 4. Writing: Students will look back at the paragraphs they constructed and use those plus their notes on the deconstruction of various scenes to construct a practice speech Note: depending on the students’ understanding of the processes, teacher will decide whether students will be required to write about various or just one Australian value. Lessons 3+4 1. Students focus on re-writing their speeches considering the teacher’s feedback and the website produced by their Year 12 peer on “how to start a handout Verbs of analysis sheet Word software and highlighter tools. Homework: Students work individually on a different scene at home and submit their paragraphs in dropbox on Schoology. Paragraph rubric Speech annotated sample Homework: Students complete their speech for homework and submit it using the dropbox facility on Schoology. structure of texts by 5.2 composing texts for specific purposes and audiences 14. Students reflect on their own processes of learning of English by 14.4 writing 13. Students reflect on own processes of responding and composing by 13.1 editing their work to correct errors and ensure consistent and appropriate style. 13. 3 assessing style in a variety of texts. 4. Students develop language relevant to the study of English including 4.1 its terminology 4.4 conventions of language 8. Students use a variety of textual forms appropriately for different purposes, audiences and contexts in all modes by 8.1 identifying the effects of language forms and features and the structures of particular texts. 14. Students reflect on their own processes of learning of English by 14.4 writing Students mark their peers’ work satisfactorily. Students compose effective speeches Teacher’s individual oral feedback. Teacher oral and written feedback
    • speech effectively”. 2. Students view and record a viewing log of ONE scene from Australia. Students start constructing their speeches for the Assessment Tasks. Students will be given a choice whether they prefer to give a speech or create an iMovie as oral assessments are believed to be quite confronting for ESL students and they might prefer to demonstrate their understanding of this unit using a voice-over in a iMovie product instead. Sally’s study skills website As per Assessment Notification guidelines Teacher written feedback