Open Access:
Developments and Strategies
Opening up by Closing the Circle:
Strengthening Open Access in India
21st October...
Overview
● What is it?
● How the market developed
● Governments and Funders
● Strategic Plan
● SAGE Open (optional)
SAGE L...
What is Open Access?
● Immediate, free and unrestricted online access to
digital scholarly material

● Primarily refers to...
Two Types of Open Access
OA Publishing – The Gold Road. Authors pay to
publish in open access journals that make their
art...
SAGE Learning Forum

Los Angeles | London | New Delhi
Singapore | Washington DC
Attribution
CC BY

Attribution-NonCommercial
CC BY-NC

Attribution-ShareAlike
CC BY-SA

Attribution-NonCommercialShareAlik...
Why Open Access?
● Technological development – the Internet has
made it feasible
● Financial pressure on library budgets
●...
Ideological
● Information wants to be free
● ‘Your taxes paid for this research you have a right
to read it’
● Fast public...
Suggested Benefits of Open Access
● Near Universal Access
● Articles are more likely to be read and cited
● Relaxes copyri...
Criticisms
● It’s vanity publishing
● It is not beneficial to the public to have access
● OA undermines the systems of pee...
224 Journals, 21,000 articles

5000 submissions a month
23,000 articles

PLOS ONE >25,000 articles to date

SAGE Learning ...
SAGE Learning Forum

Los Angeles | London | New Delhi
Singapore | Washington DC
SAGE Learning Forum

Los Angeles | London | New Delhi
Singapore | Washington DC
Editor-in-Chief: Randy Schekman, Professor of Molecular
and Cell Biology at the University of California,
Berkeley
SAGE Le...
The Rise of “Predatory Publishers”

SAGE Learning Forum

Los Angeles | London | New Delhi
Singapore | Washington DC
The Rise of “Predatory Publishers”
224 Journals

SAGE Learning Forum

Los Angeles | London | New Delhi
Singapore | Washing...
SAGE Learning Forum

Los Angeles | London | New Delhi
Singapore | Washington DC
The Rise of “Predatory Publishers”
Don’t comply with various ethical standards:
• Re-publish papers or publish papers that...
Center for Research in Applied
Phrenology" (CRAP)
“Deconstructing Access Points”
ABSTRACT
The synthesis of the Ethernet is...
● OSTP Directive – applies to any federal
agency with a budget over $100m. Requires
green deposit with a 12 month embargo ...
Open Access Policy
● As of 1st April, all research articles that result from a RCUK
funded research must be published Open...
Implications
● Universities left to decide how to use block grants
● They will be left to decide what is “important” –
wha...
Beginning 2014 all articles produced with funding from
Horizon 2020 will have to be accessible either by:
• Gold with APC ...
27th-29th May - Berlin
“…participants…will establish and endorse a Statement of Principles
on Research Integrity and agree...
Happy to take questions
@sageindiceo
in.linkedin.com/in/vivekmehra03/
www.vivekmehra.in
vivek.mehra@sagepub.in
vivekmehra0...
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Open Access Publishing: Lessons for India

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I gave this presentation at a conference at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. It was part of Open Access Week 2013, hosted by JNU but conducted by UNESCO, JNU and CEMCA

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  • Large group of people from many parts of the company
    Driver to OA
    How the market developed
    No one said anything was going to change until the funders got involved. They got involoved which is a reason, possible the reason why Open Access went mainstream in 2012.
    STM up until now.
  • Monographs
  • Founded 2001 for centre of public domain to create free copyright licences for the public
    And sadly you do actually see people at OA conferences wearing this shirt. Perhaps not the glasses.
  • To an OA Purist CC-BY is king but any will do.
    The fundamental point is, that some form of re-usage is allowed
  • 3% per annum on 2mill articles
  • Director of SME
  • I’ve included the cost item because there are some the believe this to be a fact. Houghton report showed that may be the case. JISC Funded published in 2009.
  • Most have these have been countered and accepted as wrong in STM but there’s still some way to in HSS community.
  • BMC launched 1999 be Viteck Trac
    Hindawi converted it’s fledgling subscription journals list OA in 2001/2002.
    PLOS launched with a 2002 George and Betty Moore foundation $9M
  • Driven by the Internet, communities of Open Access research
  • It’s difficult to predict exactly what effect all these policies and mandates may actually have but it’s the current direction of travel to a more Open research market is undeniable. Before getting into what the reaction has been to all this from the HSS community I would just like to take a moment to highlight what I see to be THE key development in the market – that is the launch of Elife.
    I’m highlighting this not because it is a journal funded by research agencies. Nor because it caused a huge stink by being accepted into PubMed before it had even published anything, calling into question the objectivity of the NIH itself, but because it has set up to be for PRESTIGE, high quality journal. It has been conceived to compete directly with Science and Nature. It has appointed Randy Scheckman, a very highly regarded cell biologist from UC Berkley, and chief investigator for HHMI to be the EiC and custom built a state of the art platform to deliver it’s content.
    Over time, eLife will develop additional, independent revenue streams.
    I think is demonstrates a certain maturing in the OA market. While the funding agencies have committed to supporting in it’s infancy over time it will have to be self sufficient – it’s states that eLife will develop additional, independent revenue streams and while it says this MAY include APCs they are pretty business model agnostic.
    eLife – launched on Pub Med in October than then on its on HW site in February this year. Not only do I think this is significant because it is been underwritten by the several key funding agencies but more importantly is has been purposefully created as a PRESTIGE product with the specific mission compete directly with Nature and develop a OA vehicle for the very best Life Science research. Appointed Randy Scheckman, a very highly regarded cell biologist from UC Berkley, and chief investigator for HHMI.
    Underwritten by funders. Walport now UK Chief Scientist.
  • Jeffrey Beall librarian at the University of Colorado Denver publishes a list of potentially unscrupulous OA publishers. He has a long list of criteria that includes whether publishers:
    Basically because the barrier to entry is very low. I.e. no costs are incurred until someone pays. Until subscription model that takes years of investment o establish
  • Center for Research in Applied Phrenology" (CRAP) Phil Davies, Kent Anderson
  • Things are moving very fast in the OA community but the key development in the first quarter of 2013 was the directive issued by the
    OSTP - Each agency shall submit its draft plan to OSTP within six months of publication of this memorandum. Feb 22nd = by Aug 22nd.
    The important aspect of this directive is that it recommends a 12 month embargo – it actually allows agencies chance to put a case for even longer embargoes but they have to be to justify them.
    This stands in contrast to the FASTR the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act FASTR introduced to congress Feb 2013
    FRPAA Federal Research Public Access Act, Introduced to congress 2006 and Feb 2012
    Very similar. FASTR is strengthened version of FRPAA.
    Key difference is that FRPAA is silent on licensing. FASTR = material must be made available “in formats and under terms that enable productive reuse, including computational analysis by state-of-the-art technologies”
    Encourages Open Licensing. But does not specify CC.
  • The most concrete development 1st April, 2013. I’m not sure if they chose April fools day purposefully but given the manner that this policy was rolled out it is certainly appropriate
    From an procedural perspective the most striking thing is the way that have chosen to implement it…block grants.
    Howard Wollman - Vice Chair of the BSA Honorary Fellow Sociology, School of Social and Political ScienceUniversity of Edinburgh. “the phrase “Light touch Regulation given Universities nightmares”
     
    Organisations may use block grants in the manner they consider will best deliver the RCUK Policy on Open Access, as long as the primary purpose to support the payment of APC is fulfilled.
      
  • This is particularly worrying for HSS because
    OA to date driven by STEM
    Is now going to impact HSS
    Not designed for it
  • July 17th 2012The EC have also taken a similar position as part of it’s Horizon 2020 initiatives – which is concerned with the next round of EC research funding. From 2014-2020 the EC will allocate €80B and as of 2014, all articles produced with funding from Horizon 2020 will have to be accessible:
    articles will either immediately be made accessible online by the publisher ('Gold' open access) - up-front publication costs can be eligible for reimbursement by the European Commission; or
    researchers will make their articles available through an open access repository no later than six months (12 months for articles in the fields of social sciences and humanities) after publication ('Green' open access).
    The Commission has also recommended that Member States take a similar approach to the results of research funded under their own domestic programmes. The goal is for 60% of European publicly-funded research articles to be available under open access by 2016.
    In Germany, academic freedom is enshrined in constitution.
  • Sitting above this is the Global Research Council. This is a virtual organization, comprised of the heads of science and engineering funding agencies from around the world, dedicated to promoting the sharing of data and best practices for high-quality collaboration among funding agencies worldwide.
    27th-29th May - Berlin
    After a Welcome Dinner on 27 May, participants of the summit will establish and endorse a Statement of Principles on Research Integrity and agree on an action plan for implementing Open Access to Publications as the main paradigm of scientific communication in the following years
    While none of these policy initiatives in isolation are likely to have a great deal of effect on the global research community, in combination that reflect an undeniable direction of travel and one that we have to be cognisant of as we plan for the future.
  • Open Access Publishing: Lessons for India

    1. 1. Open Access: Developments and Strategies Opening up by Closing the Circle: Strengthening Open Access in India 21st October 2013 – JNU Convention Centre, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi Vivek Mehra Managing Director & CEO SAGE India Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    2. 2. Overview ● What is it? ● How the market developed ● Governments and Funders ● Strategic Plan ● SAGE Open (optional) SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    3. 3. What is Open Access? ● Immediate, free and unrestricted online access to digital scholarly material ● Primarily refers to peer-reviewed primary research articles in scholarly journals ● Allows reasonably unrestricted re-use of material SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    4. 4. Two Types of Open Access OA Publishing – The Gold Road. Authors pay to publish in open access journals that make their articles freely accessible online immediately upon publication. OA Self-Archiving – The Green Road. Authors publish in a subscription journal, but make their articles freely accessible online, usually by depositing them in a repository. SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    5. 5. SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    6. 6. Attribution CC BY Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC Attribution-ShareAlike CC BY-SA Attribution-NonCommercialShareAlike CC BY-NC-SA Attribution-NoDerivs CC BY-ND Attribution-NonCommercialNoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    7. 7. Why Open Access? ● Technological development – the Internet has made it feasible ● Financial pressure on library budgets ● Ideological SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    8. 8. Ideological ● Information wants to be free ● ‘Your taxes paid for this research you have a right to read it’ ● Fast publication and open unrestricted access to research drives further progress in research ● Will reduce the cost of the system SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    9. 9. Suggested Benefits of Open Access ● Near Universal Access ● Articles are more likely to be read and cited ● Relaxes copyright restrictions – allows (limited) re-use ● Will reduce the cost of the system SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    10. 10. Criticisms ● It’s vanity publishing ● It is not beneficial to the public to have access ● OA undermines the systems of peer review ● Lead to an increase in the publication of poor quality research ● Penalises high research intensity universities ● Will not reduce the total costs SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    11. 11. 224 Journals, 21,000 articles 5000 submissions a month 23,000 articles PLOS ONE >25,000 articles to date SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    12. 12. SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    13. 13. SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    14. 14. Editor-in-Chief: Randy Schekman, Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    15. 15. The Rise of “Predatory Publishers” SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    16. 16. The Rise of “Predatory Publishers” 224 Journals SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    17. 17. SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    18. 18. The Rise of “Predatory Publishers” Don’t comply with various ethical standards: • Re-publish papers or publish papers that contain plagiarism • Use spam email to solicit manuscripts or editorial board memberships, or review requests • Have no policies or practices that relate to digital preservation • Focus on authors (not readers) and on getting their fees at the expense of readers SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    19. 19. Center for Research in Applied Phrenology" (CRAP) “Deconstructing Access Points” ABSTRACT The synthesis of the Ethernet is a confusing grand challenge. Given the current status of knowledgebased archetypes, statisticians particularly desire the refinement of superpages, which embodies the practical principles of software engineering. In order to address this riddle, we investigate how web browsers can be applied to the construction of the Ethernet. The Open Information Science Journal published by Bentham Open SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    20. 20. ● OSTP Directive – applies to any federal agency with a budget over $100m. Requires green deposit with a 12 month embargo as a guideline ● FASTR (new FRPAA) - requires green deposit with 6 month embargo. SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    21. 21. Open Access Policy ● As of 1st April, all research articles that result from a RCUK funded research must be published Open Access ● A preference for immediate Gold OA facilitated by payment of APCs ● If Gold publication not possible – embargoed green is acceptable (mandated embargoes vary) ● CC-BY licence required for Gold, CC-BY-NC for Green ● Block Grants to fund APCs being made available directly to the University - Light touch regulation with universities left to decide how to they want to administer SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    22. 22. Implications ● Universities left to decide how to use block grants ● They will be left to decide what is “important” – what needs to be published fast (Gold) what can wait to be published (Green) ● Libraries will expect to see a reduction on subscription fees commensurate with what they are paying in APCs SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    23. 23. Beginning 2014 all articles produced with funding from Horizon 2020 will have to be accessible either by: • Gold with APC eligible for reimbursement • Green with an embargo of no later than 6 months (12 months for HSS) The goal is for 60% of European publicly-funded research articles to be available under open access by 2016. SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    24. 24. 27th-29th May - Berlin “…participants…will establish and endorse a Statement of Principles on Research Integrity and agree on an action plan for implementing Open Access to Publications” SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
    25. 25. Happy to take questions @sageindiceo in.linkedin.com/in/vivekmehra03/ www.vivekmehra.in vivek.mehra@sagepub.in vivekmehra03@gmail.com www.slideshare.net/vivekmehra03/ SAGE Learning Forum Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC

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