The Future of Academic Publishing
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This is the presentation I made at the first Tejeshwar Singh Trust's conference on the future of Social Science publishing. It is my vision of the future and not necessarily the only truth. I......

This is the presentation I made at the first Tejeshwar Singh Trust's conference on the future of Social Science publishing. It is my vision of the future and not necessarily the only truth. I talked around the slides and am sorry I don't have a recording of it.

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  • Today time for discussions Focus on innovation in context Then delve into college transformation Then show where we are in college and where we are going 2012 was pivotal. Inflexion point? Bod D accelerate too Also a reminder about a culture of innovation and an ability to execute
  • Focusing on HE Not trade or K-!2 even though some overlap The two big drivers and digital and geographical This focus is on digital revolution Inflexion point?
  • 2012 was a pivotal year More about transformation than growth Innovation needs to accelerate
  • Education and Research both in transition
  • Tied back to your vision. What doesn ’t change is on the x axis We have seen a prize and built a $20M business and a platform for strong growth We still see the biggest and highest margin prizes in D, but will accelerate in C too We can still expect trad disruptions in A and B eg rental and society terms A to B Americ We are rooted in social science Tip of iceberg an Rev, B to D is European
  • A Content Play Facts and Figs about the industry Big changes coming from Geography and Technology And the author cares most STM much bigger 30k jnls publishing 1.5M articles 2k publishers Content at our centre so we need to attract controllers of IP Not all do everything. Many reinventing as services businesses
  • Slide #7: the big college publishers: re-order to reflect their market size (in the U.S.): Pearson is #1, Cenage #2, MHill #3, Wiley #4; Pearson revenue shown is for all Pearson Ed (includes K-12, Int ’l, Professional, and US College). MHill revenue total shown is for all MH education, but the logo to the left shows MH Higher Ed, so should show logo for MH Education.
  • Apple iBooks Author (working better for trade titles) Apple ’s ‘agency model’ credited w reducing Amazon monopoly now under legal scrutiny from EU and DoJ. Trial Summer Google Books Search settlement completed. Books now available under Google Play Amazon ’s Kindle e-textbooks promise savings of up to 60% for buyers and 80% for renters compared to the print edition’s list price. Yet more device warring starting with Kindle Fire. ‘Tablet dethrones the e-reader’. Smartphones next. For example iBooks Author was launched by Apple in early 2012 as a bid to  disrupt the textbooks market  by democratising production. The idea floated at launch was with a user-friendly tool to exploit teachers could start authoring their own textbooks. Fast forward a year and while there ’s very little data to indicate a grassroots revolution in classroom learning materials, it seems the tool is being eagerly taken up by trade publishers. rich textbook content. That about sums up this last week's eve nts. Oh wait. You can only sell that content produced with iBooks Author on the App Store and of course all of those texts are stuck in Apple's "Walled Garden". The European Commission  announced  on Thursday that it reached an agreement with Appl e and fou r major book publishers that addresses concerns over possible e-book price-fixing. Simon & Schuster, Harper Collins, Hachette Livre, Macmillan, and Apple all agreed to modify existing agreements to allow retailers to discount e-books for two years and to eliminate "most-favored nation" clauses for five years. The Commission is satisfied that the changes address anti-competition issues and has suspended its investigation without levying fines or other sanctions. themselves apart in a competitive new area of education: 1. KNO (Publisher) College e-textbook provider Kno expanded their market to the K-12 audience through a deal with Ho ugh ton Mifflin Harcourt, who previously offered K-12 social studies e-texts through the iPad. The books are rooted in Common Core standards, but aren ’t state specific, and include 3D features, links, notes and videos. Kno’s books are available to rent for home study at $10 per title for iPad, web and Windows 7 readers, with Android support coming “soon.” 2. COURSESMART (Marketplace/Platform) CourseSmart—whose catalog includes over 30,000 e-textbooks from 40 publishers—announced a new e-textbook pilot program last year with Internet2 and Educause. Thro ugh the program, educational institutions can purchase license-based access to titles for a flat fee ($27,500 per semester for a 100-student license or $44,000 per semester for a 200-student license). Additionally, the company ’s CourseSmart Analytics program, which was piloted at three colleges, uses an algorithm to compile and analyze va rious stude nt usage m etrics to provide professors an idea of their students’ engagement in the material. (To learn more, check out Education Dive’s interview with CourseSmart VP, Marketing Cindy Clarke.) 3. INKLING (Platform) Inkling is working with te xtbook publishers to creat e more interactive e-textbook content, with features including note taking, highlighting and qu izzes. Students can additionally purchase content by the chapter, allowing them a full-content preview without the commitment of a full textbook purchase. The Inkling app is available for free through iTunes. 4. ELEVENLEARNING (Platform) Rather than offering texts from big publishers, ElevenLearning ’s focus is oriented around offering crowd-sourced textbooks written by experts and edited and maintained by a community of educators and co nsumers. Thoug h they only have four titles currently available, their model, if successful, could bring a disruptive change to the marketplace that would greatly benefit cash-strapped students. 5. MCGRAW-HILL (Publisher) Earlier this month, McGraw-Hill Education unveiled their new “ SmartBooks ” at the 2013 International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The publisher’s latest addition to the e-textbook market will adapt to reader behavior by measu ring facto rs such as retention and reading pace. By spring, around 90 SmartBooks should be available for $19.99 each. McGraw-Hill isn’t the only publishing giant to get in on adaptive learning, though, as Pearson and MacMillan both also have their own adaptive assessment tools. 6. MACMILLAN (Publisher) MacMillan ’s “ DynamicBooks ” offer instructors the ability to rearrange, customize, combine and add their own materials to textbook content. Aside from allowing the textbook to perfectly match sylla bi, DynamicB ooks include interactive and multimedia features. Plus, they’re cheaper than paper textbooks and accessible via computer, iPhone, iPad and other tablet devices. 7. ELSEVIER (Publisher) Elsevier announced last fall that it would make a free, non-downloadable version of one of its e-textbooks available to students in edX ’s Circuits & Electronics MOOC. Originally offered as a free downloa d the previous fall, the publishing giant found that providing only a “static,” non-downloadable PNG version increased sales of the text. As part of the arrangement, the syllabus for the course links to Elsevier’s website, where discounted copies of the print and full electronic editions can then be purchased. 8. PEARSON (Publisher) In December, Pearson received top honors in the 2012 “Tech & Learning” Awards of excellence for three of its iBooks Textbooks . The texts—Pearson Algebra I Common Core Edition, Pearson Geometry Common Core Edition and Miller & Levine Biology—are part of an e-textbook suite launched in January 2012 that feature c ontent enhan ced with v ideo, audio, assessments, interactive images and 3D animations. The honors additionally allowed the publisher to lead the award program for the third consecutive year. 9. CHEGG (Platform/Marketplace) Silicon Valley start-up Chegg—which launched in 2007 as a textbook rental company—offers its own e-textbook reader . Compatible with all connected devices, the reader allows students to search, highlight, take notes and see other students ’ highlights. The eReader also allows round-the-clock access to Chegg’s Homework Help Q&A, as well as 7-day access to an e-textbook if you ordered a physical edition. 10. NOOK STUDY (BARNES & NOBLE) (Platform) Barnes & Noble offers a free NOOK Study app for PC and Mac computers. The app allows users to search, highlight, tag and link, as well as access course handouts. It also offers free 7-day trials of e-textbooks. 11. OPENSTAX (Publisher) OpenStax --a nonprofit, open-access publisher operating out of Rice University— announced in December that it would begin offering a paid version of its free, online College Physics text. Available through iTunes as an iBook for $4.99, it features extras like videos, interactive graphics, quizzes and demonstrations. As of December, the company has funding for eight textbooks with fundraising in the works for 17 more, and plans to expand to more platforms. 12. APPLE E-TEXTBOOKS (Platform) Just over a year ago, Apple announced its entrance into the crowded e-textbook market, with a build-your-own-textbook tool sticking out in particular. With iBooks Author, professors can add images from their iPhoto libraries, iTunes video clips, and Keynote lecture slides—though the program runs only on Macs, meaning professors and students would have to adopt Apple products. Also announced at the event, iTunesU—a course-management system alternative—was seen as being more likely to be widely adopted. 13. INGRAM/VITALSOURCE BOOKSHELF (Platform/Marketplace) Ingram ’s VitalSource touts its Bookshelf app as the “preferred and most used e-textbook delivery platform in the world of higher education.” With content from more than 200 top academic publishers available via laptop, desktop, or mobile device and a partnership with Blackboard Learn, it’s a hard point to argue. In December, 35,000 new digital textbooks and course materials were added to the platform. The app is free, as are a selection of sample texts . 14. TUATARA'S GILAPAD (Platform) Northeastern graphic design graduate Xavier Xicay and William Hoover, a McGraw-Hill digital author and Bunker Hill Community College anatomy professor, founded Tuatara with one goal in mind—disrupting the existing higher education model. The company ’s web-based e-book platform, GilaPad , has already attracted publishers like McGraw-Hill, Pearson, Wiley and Jones & Bartlett, and launched in a closed beta this past fall. Prior to the beta, the platform was tested with 100 professors and over 1,000 students at MIT, Bunker Hill and other Boston-area colleges. Tuatara are currently seeking $6 to 8 million in funding, and Xicay says publishers have also shown interest in owning part of the company. 15. AMAZON/KINDLE (Platform/Marketplace) With Amazon ’s Kindle e-textbooks , the company promises savings of up to 60% for buyers and 80% for renters compared to the print edition’s list price. Available on Kindle Fire—and via the Kindle app for iPad, Android tablets, PC and Mac—Kindle’s e-textbooks offer instant access to a books most important information with glossary definitions and relevant page links via the platform’s Xray feature. The feature also links to related content from Wikipedia and YouTube and is available on most of the platform’s most popular textbooks. Kindle’s “Whispersync” technology also synchronizes bookmarks, notes and highlights across devices. 16. KORTEXT (Platform) Kortext , a digital textbook platform based in the United Kingdom, launched last year in partnership with John Smith ’s, a UK campus retail company, and Aspire, JS Group’s bursary management system. Partner publishers from around the world include Pearson, Wiley, McGraw-Hill, Taylor & Francis, Palgrave and Oxford University Press. Additionally, the University of East London and Regents College have already made deals with the company to provide its platform—which is available on most devices—to more than 2,000 students.
  • Marginal Voices have the heft The European Commission  announced  on Thursday that it reached an agreement with Apple and four major book publishers that addresses concerns over possible e-book price-fixing. Simon & Schuster, Harper Collins, Hachette Livre, Macmillan, and Apple all agreed to modify existing agreements to allow retailers to discount e-books for two years and to eliminate "most-favored nation" clauses for five years. The Commission is satisfied that the changes address anti-competition issues and has suspended its investigation without levying fines or other sanctions.
  • MOOCS, OER, Open Textbooks, Fair vs. Free pricing Threats and opportunities Our support of the value of premium, quality educational content that drives student outcomes and success Eleven Learning build crowd sourced textbooks Freemium? Fair not Free prices?
  • PLoS One The first open access mega-journal and now the largest journal in the world by volume of articles published Journal ’s scope covers 52 medical and hard science disciplines As of 2011, 1-in-60 articles in PubMed were published in PLoS One; journal published 26,309 articles in 2012 Impact factor of 4.092; ranked in top-quartile of JCR category 3,500 editorial board members; approximately 69% of submissions are ultimately published; average time from submission to acceptance in 161 days, acceptance to publication 52 days (2011) Large percentage of authors receive governmental or institutional funding; on some level research process and outputs have been vetted prior to submission Gold OA journal; APC of $1,350 with discounts for authors from developing or disadvantaged economies PLoS One is arguably the most successful large OA journal; we ’re trying to replicate eLife Another OA science and medicine mega-journal; this one supported by three funding agencies, Max Planck, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Wellcome Trust Operates under the mantra “a journal run by scientists, for scientists,” eLife pays reviewers; goal is to increase transparency and amount of communication throughout publication process Funding agencies have committed to financially supporting the journal for three to five years; journal must find a self-sustaining business model in that time Journal was announced to much speculation in 2011; released first four papers to PubMedCentral in October 2012; it ’s own website launched in December with some kinks; journal is hosted by HighWire Receiving approximately 50 submissions and publishing 10-15 papers a month; published 62 papers since launch Gold OA journal; currently authors are not charged an APC---expect eLife to announce their fee schedule within year Hindawi Known to SAGE; launched in 1997 as a traditional publisher, covered entire list to OA by 2007 Now publishes 476 open-access journals, only 22 ranked On predatory OA journal watchlist; accused of publishing too many journals to manage well---some journals have only published one or two papers Most journals operate using Gold-OA model; APCs vary from free to $1,200 for medical titles Considered a pioneer but not successful Frontiers Launched with Frontiers in Neuroscience in February 2007; currently publish 14 journals with plans to launch an additional 13 this year. Journals cover hard sciences, medicine, psychology, and allied health disciplines Five of current 14 journals are ranked Frontiers ’ journals use a collaborative, structured, and open peer review system; authors and reviews can communicate and full reviews are posted alongside the article Journals operate using a unique editorial model---in addition to publishing unsolicited articles there are often a series of evolving thematic research topics that operate like special issues published over time APC of $2,150, discounted if author serves on Frontiers editorial board or as reviewer or if submitting to a research topic PeerJ Announced June 2012 and began receiving submissions in December. Journal expects to publish its first articles early in 2013 Rather than charging authors APCs, PeerJ has established something like a membership scheme: each author of a paper is charged $99 for a lifetime membership that enables them to publish one paper a year, $199 for two papers a year, and $299 for an unlimited number of papers; there are expectations that the author also reviews at least one manuscript a year to keep their membership PeerJ started with a $950,000 investment from O ’Reilly Media and O’Reilly AlphaTech Ventures, a venture capital firm Developing all of its own manuscript and publishing systems
  • Finch report actually called Accessibility, Sus, Exc Free for whom? Pay to Publish What mechanisms for rising above the crowd, and does that matter? How do you add something new? OLH – more than journals? Looking for 1.5m startup funding Publishers charging for OA – Springer E15,000 Does HSS vs STM How to ensure a system that 1)Filters 2)Disseminates 3) Debates – with members of the community behind it
  • Subject: Mooc conference   Mooc conference Senate house   Online and open access learning   Sir Adrian Smith Vc London   Turning MOOCs into bus models for trad HE   Where is the added value I. The chain   Who are the mooc audience?   Historical distrust of ODL   Biggest audience already has a degree. 80%   Big issue of coverage. Very patchy Coursera aspires to cover core content of all major courses   William Lawton Observatory of border less edu Business model 2.56m students on Coursera now. 8k an hour   Edx not for profit   Catalunya 100% online teaching since 1995   Pearson view runs exams for udacity 89 dollars per exam Udacity remedial stats course with San Jose state Uni At behest of Ca governor   Antioch offering MOOCs for formal credit   ACE evaluating courses to see if they are credit worthy   E Cornell. Two course model. First course free   Minervae. Harvard for those who could not get in.   France digital Uni. New hei   Class2go smart phone versions   How impact on pedagogy. Innovations in blended learning Adds pressure to reduce costs Unis to share intro course content Impact on jobs   Analysis of who audience is needed   Drummond Bone   Liverpool laureate partners. Ma courses. 10k enrolled   Jeff Gordon vp Pearson learning and ac strategy   Simulations Jeff borden Head magnet assesses our forget curve We need seven reminders per year or we forget   Social learning vygotsky   Text is worst of online ed Mark edmundsen says online learning does not work 50% of us teaching is lectures Sleep has more brain activity than lecture attendance   John seely brown rather hire world of war raft than Harvard MBA   Advocates games Zon learn Chinese in three weeks   Is the mooc authentic Peer review is difficult   Diana l 100 k uk dl students. 5.3% of ug pop 1 to 25 he staff stu ratio   Illich talked of convivial tools   Online library of learning designs. Sharing pedagogy Generic versions for re use   Tool. Pedagogical pattern collector Browse or design own learning designs Offering different perspectives withindiscussions Could we browse this library Investigation activities Discussion activities Teachers to adopt and adapt designs   Teachers need to build the tools, not developers   Q. Where is the quality regulation? Q. Issue of retention   Competency based model rather than time based model   Tools to make teachers time more efficiently used Too many MOOCs are text based Mooc model fits well with cpd   Impact of assessment and role of accreditation Takes too much teacher time Simulation offers digital model of assessment Have to get beyond marking challenges Go beyond mcqs Concealed mcqs are better. Conceal the answers and get student input Borden. Assessment about data. 440 assessment methods, but Uni uses two. Look at Newton or my labs. Continuous assessment Use data systems to inform assessment Mooc companies not sharing data, but charging for it   Distance learning in china. Worlds most widely read e magazine   Dl edu is the stuff you can't learn for yourself. What is edu for? Edu is about taking it further and going beyond   Peer review and peer grading Peer grading and review are different Grading is easier Review is much harder,   Diana oblinger CEO of educause Perceptions lag behind reality MOOCs as brand extension or new publishing model   Learning decoupled from time and place Connected age not information age Maps and pathways, not gates and gatekeepers Immersive collaborative environments Individualised pathways Too many choices are the enemy of success   Edu pathway tools will develop 62% students in us go tomore than one HEI WEave in and out of system Value web not value chain   Outside in. HEI adopts outside course Straighter line. Company provides courses on per month payment basis HEIs dealing with straighter line Lowers cost of failure Outside in. MOOCs provide course for HEI   Inside out dL programmes Service providers for HEI. Private label the service Two you company. Masters of arts I. Teaching provided by TwoYou. Provide instructional designers Orgs take commission   College for America. Competency based programme. Students embedded in large companies completing degree   Edwin Eisendrath Huron Consulting Group Works with changing markets with HEIs   Don't bet against trad higher ed Unis will come out on top He needs vision   That phrase again.... Competency based Incentives will be key   He needs to coordinate platforms etc     Prior learning assessment also key My edu .com. Gathers info o. He from students and big data sources Data in hands of students   How do VLEs accommodate MOOCs?   We need positive deviancy and less cttes to innovate   No getting around the one to 25 ratio problem. Teaching support requires 1:25
  •   Moody's downgraded us he Price sensitivity a bigger issue than ever Root and branch re exam of costs of HE  
  • (the EU's Research & Innovation funding programme

Transcript

  • 1. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC The Future of Academic Publishing Presented at the Tejeshwar Singh Memorial Trust Seminar on Social Sciences and Humanities Publishing Today 23rd March 2013 Vivek Mehra Managing Director &CEO, SAGE Publications India Pvt. Ltd.
  • 2. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Acknowledgement and use of images: I wish to acknowledge the efforts of my team at SAGE who helped me learn. The images I have used are for representation and not for any commercial use. The presentation was part of a conference for which I volunteered. For any queries on copyright, or details on the source of these images, please feel free to write to me.
  • 3. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Academic publishing as we know it (books)
  • 4. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Academic publishing as we know it (journals)
  • 5. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Academic publishing as we somewhat know
  • 6. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Academic publishing as we somewhat know
  • 7. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Libraries as we know them
  • 8. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Libraries as we know them
  • 9. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Libraries as we don’t know themClassic definition of a library: 1. Building or room containing collections of books, periodicals, and sometimes films and recorded music for people to read, borrow... 2. A collection of books and periodicals held in such a building or room 3. A collection of films, recorded music, genetic material, etc., organized systematically and kept for research or borrowing
  • 10. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Libraries as we don’t know them
  • 11. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Libraries as we don’t know them
  • 12. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Libraries as we don’t know them
  • 13. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Publishing as we don’t know it Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Our Expertise – Your Journals
  • 14. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Publishing as we don’t know it
  • 15. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Publishing as we don’t know it
  • 16. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Some more game changers...
  • 17. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Publishers as we know them ● Pearson Plc (1844) ● McGraw/Hill (2007) ● Cengage (1917) (1807)
  • 18. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Some more familiar names (1880) ● Springer (1842) ● T&F (1855) ● Wolters Kluwe (1836) ● (Von Holz (1843) (1965)
  • 19. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Publishers as we don’t know them
  • 20. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC And if that wasn’t enough...
  • 21. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC (...the not so) Open World of Open Access ● Challenging the very concept of IP and copyright – Creative Commons Licenses In 2012 OA went mainstream ● Role of Institutions • Harvard Mandate • MOOCs ● Role of Funders and Governments • Demands for more ‘open’ availability
  • 22. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Learning, for free...
  • 23. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Open Access Publishing...
  • 24. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Open Access Monographs Palgrave Macmillan: £10,000 Monograph £7,500 Pivot Springer: £15,000
  • 25. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC SAGE is in on it... Open Access Journal Launches
  • 26. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC
  • 27. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC ● Awards: ● 2011 Magnum Opus Gold Award for Best Navigation for Electronic Publication ● 2011 Apex Award for One-of-a-Kind Electronic ● Choice’s Outstanding Academic Title for 2012 ● Scored 4/5 stars in Advisor Reviews from The Charleston Advisor, October 2012 “SAGE’s activities reported here suggest that in some areas social sciences may actually be ahead of the rest on the innovation curve…!” Outsell, November 2010
  • 28. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC View from the top... CEO Educause - Diana Oblinger ● Learning decoupled from time and place ● Connected age not information age ● Maps and pathways, not gates and gatekeepers ● Immersive collaborative environments ● Individualized pathways
  • 29. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Crystal Balls don’t agree ● Davos verdict: ‘It’s over for all but 10 Elite Universities’ ● Larry Summers predicts ‘both will exist’ like live and televised sport
  • 30. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Current Government OA Initiatives • FRPAA expected to be re-introduced this month (Federal Research Public Access Act) • OSTP (Office of Science and Technology Policy) to re-engage with America COMPETES (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science Act of 2007) • Finch Report published June 2012; backed a Gold Open Access model. RCUK (Research Councils UK) Implementation begins April 1 • Australia and Ireland (among others) go green • July 2012: EU Commission announces OA will be a general principle of Horizon 2020
  • 31. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC The new world of publishing, for authors
  • 32. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC The new world of publishing, for authors I thought of many ways to say this Why me…
  • 33. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC The new world of publishing, for authors I have what I want
  • 34. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC The new world of publishing, for authors What should I choose?
  • 35. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC The new world of publishing, for authors
  • 36. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC The new world for publishers... ● In the last 3 years publishers deployed innovations that cost (development) around US$ 200 million ● 40% don’t exist today...
  • 37. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC The new world for publishers... Investments needed…
  • 38. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC My own Crystal Ball gazing (grazing???) Dramatic growth of research in Asia (Western dominance in publishing will end) Economies of scale will not determine success - value of publications increase with usage - a successful publisher will drive usage Even greater automation in production workflows on the cards Platform neutrality essential to cost-effective digital publishing Custom solutions will become the rule not the exception Web will become the dominant distribution channel but niche market for printed products will always remain Authorship will change platforms - MS Word could be replaced by a mobile camera used to create a video Leadership/management supplemented by sufficient digital skills (marketing, digital media, analytics) essential for sustaining publishing
  • 39. Los Angeles | London | New Delhi Singapore | Washington DC Thanks! Sleep generates more brain activity than lecture attendance... You can find me in many ways: Email: vivek.mehra@sagepub.in www.linkedin.com/in/vivekmehra03 vivekmehra03.wordpress.com @sageindiaceo