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Email In Action: a US Study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy
 

Email In Action: a US Study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy

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    Email In Action: a US Study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Email In Action: a US Study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Document Transcript

    • Market Data / Supplier Selection / Event Presentations / User Experience Benchmarking / Best Practice / Template Files / Trends & Innovation2012: Email in ActionA US study by the Email ExperienceCouncil of the DMA and Econsultancy
    • 2012: Email inActionA US study by the EmailExperience Council of the DMAand EconsultancyPublished February 2012 Econsultancy New York Econsultancy London 41 East 11th St., 11th Floor 4th Floor, The Corner New York, NY 10003 91-93 Farringdon RoadAll rights reserved. No part of this publication may be United States London EC1M 3LNreproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, United Kingdomelectronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording Telephone:or any information storage and retrieval system, without +1 212 699 3626 Telephone:prior permission in writing from the publisher. +44 (0)20 7269 1450 http://econsultancy.comCopyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012 help@econsultancy.com
    • Contents 1. Introduction from the Email Experience Council of the DMA ................................................................................ 6 2. Executive Summary ........................................................ 7 3. Email in Action ............................................................... 9 3.1. Challenges to Email .................................................................. 9 3.2. Email and Social ...................................................................... 11 3.3. Testing and Tracking ............................................................... 13 3.4. Budgeting and Financial Metrics ............................................ 18 3.5. Email Benchmarks .................................................................. 22 3.6. Personalization & Segmentation ............................................. 28 3.7. List Size and Growth ............................................................... 32 3.8. Automation ............................................................................. 34 3.9. Improving Email Performance................................................ 36 4. Methodology and Respondent Demographics .............. 39 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 3 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Table of FiguresFigure 1: Challenges to Future Success in Email ........................................................... 9Figure 2: Clients‟ Use of Email: The Agency View ...................................................... 10Figure 3: Social and Email Integration ......................................................................... 11Figure 4: Social and Email Integration (B2C) ..............................................................12Figure 5: Social and Email Integration (B2B) ..............................................................12Figure 6: Email Factors Tested .....................................................................................13Figure 7: Email Factors Tested (B2C) ...........................................................................14Figure 8: Email Factors Tested (B2B) ..........................................................................14Figure 9: Email Metrics Tracked .................................................................................. 15Figure 10: Email Metrics Tracked (B2C) ......................................................................16Figure 11: Email Metrics Tracked (B2B) ....................................................................... 17Figure 12: Email Budget Distribution .......................................................................... 18Figure 13: Email Budget Distribution (B2C) ................................................................19Figure 14: Email Budget Distribution (B2B) ................................................................19Figure 15: Financial Metrics Tracked .......................................................................... 20Figure 16: Financial Metrics Tracked (B2C).................................................................21Figure 17: Financial Metrics Tracked (B2B) .................................................................21Figure 18: B2C Lead Generation – Newsletter Benchmarks ...................................... 22Figure 19: B2C Lead Generation – Sales Email Benchmarks ..................................... 23Figure 20: B2B Lead Generation – Newsletter Benchmarks...................................... 23Figure 21: B2B Lead Generation – Sales Email Benchmarks ..................................... 24Figure 22: B2C Direct Sales – Newsletter Benchmarks .............................................. 24Figure 23: B2C Direct Sales – Sales Email Benchmarks ............................................ 25Figure 24: B2B Direct Sales – Newsletter Benchmarks .............................................. 25Figure 25: B2B Direct Sales – Sales Email Benchmarks ............................................ 26Figure 26: Definitions of Inactivity .............................................................................. 27Figure 27: Factors in Personalization/Segmentation ................................................. 28Figure 28: Factors in Personalization/Segmentation (B2C) ...................................... 29Figure 29: Factors in Personalization/Segmentation (B2B) ...................................... 29Figure 30: Preferences Offered to Subscribers ........................................................... 30Figure 31: Preferences Offered to Subscribers (B2C) ..................................................31Figure 32: Preferences Offered to Subscribers (B2B) ..................................................31Figure 33: Changes in List Size .................................................................................... 32Figure 34: Changes in List Size (B2C) ......................................................................... 33Figure 35: Changes in List Size (B2B) ......................................................................... 33Figure 36: Effectiveness of Automated Triggers ......................................................... 34Figure 37: Effectiveness of Automated Triggers (B2C) ............................................... 352012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 4All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 38: Effectiveness of Automated Triggers (B2B) .............................................. 35Figure 39: Word Cloud – “What‟s the Key to Effective Email?” ................................. 36Figure 40: Respondent Organizations by Type ........................................................... 39Figure 41: Size of Respondent Organizations .............................................................. 40Figure 42: Target Markets of Respondent Organizations .......................................... 40Figure 43: Respondents‟ Primary Conversion Goal .....................................................41Figure 44: Respondents‟ Database Size (B2C) .............................................................41Figure 45: Respondents‟ Database Size (B2B) ............................................................ 422012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 5All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 1. Introduction from the Email Experience Council of the DMA Email marketing is going through a bit of a mid-life crisis. The changes in the way people communicate with each other have generated some valid questions about the future of email. Is it still as relevant as it once was before the rise of social media and the mass penetration of smartphones? How can it compete with other media that are always on, ready to provide instant feedback from friends and companies? Are younger people less likely to read email regularly? DMA‟s Email Experience Council and Econsultancy set out to find out how marketers are answering these questions. What we found is that concern about email is widespread, but gloom about its future is not. For most marketers, the challenge is not to find out whether or not to use email, it‟s more about rediscovering how to use it. Virtually every marketer remains an email marketer. This ubiquity, however, has generated one of email marketing‟s greatest weaknesses. Everyone gets too much email, which has reduced the impact of all email. Clutter is a major problem, especially in the face of competition from social media. As a result, providing relevant email that works with social media is a high priority for marketers. Marketers are increasing the relevance of emails through personalization and better matching of behavioral data with content. Even so, most marketers want to do more, and more quickly. With consumers online continuously with their smartphones, email needs to move faster. As a result, automated response email systems that smartly use data have grown in popularity. Email does not seem to be in decline, but it is changing. We invite email marketers to use this report to see where their colleagues expect email marketing to go in the future. Yoram Wurmser, Ph.D. Director, Marketing & Media Insights Direct Marketing Association The Email Experience Council of the Direct Marketing Association celebrates and empowers marketers around the globe to create amazing subscriber experiences, follow and improve email marketing best practices and, by their example and dedication, demonstrate the critical role email plays in integrated marketing. Our mission is to invest in, educate and bring together innovative email and digital marketers who understand the critical role email marketing plays in integrated, multi-channel marketing. The Council provides a broad series of initiatives that illustrate the importance of email marketing as a communications vehicle. We accomplish this through stellar education at our conferences, relevant research, legislative advocacy and member roundtables and advisory committees. We continually partner with innovative companies who positively impact our community and represent the voices of our members. Sign up for our free newsletters and gain access to a wealth of information: www.emailexperience.org. . 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 6 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 2. Executive Summary Email will always be a tactic that suffers from averages, because it is really two channels – one that‟s precise, highly effective and unique, the other a blunt instrument that attempts to compensate for relevance with volume. At organizations that practice the first, email continues to rank as the tactic with the highest return and as the best way for communicating with customers and prospects over the long-term. For organizations still “batching and blasting” the results have ebbed, deliverability has dropped, and list growth is slowing. But by the standards of digital marketing, this is an old phenomenon and these are old arguments. Perennial articles drum up interest with the claim that “email is dead” and far flung defenders come together to repel the attack. There‟s self-interest, but also passion in the defense, because saying that email doesn‟t work simply isn‟t true. It does and for some, it works better than anything else. At the same time, the industry has to acknowledge that online behaviors are changing in a profound way and on a massive scale. It‟s not yet clear whether the new social and mobile Internet is more or less friendly to the use of email, but for certain, it means rethinking email strategy, and optimizing the subscriber experience for this new world. The Email in Action Survey, conducted with the Email Experience Council of the DMA, benefits from the input of over 450 marketing organizations, ESPs and agencies focused on email. Fielded in the fourth quarter of 2011, the survey explored the challenges, opportunities and changes in email marketing. Challenges to Email  75% of respondents describe competition with social media as “somewhat” or “very” challenging.  In a similar vein, 69% believe that young people are abandoning email as a primary channel.  Email still gets the short end of the budgetary stick; 65% report that it‟s a challenge to get the budget that their email programs deserve.  In spite of these challenges, agencies report that the majority (60%) of their clients who use them for email are increasing their email usage. Email and Social  The use of sharing icons is widespread (69%) but for many companies, that‟s as far as their efforts to integrate the two channels go.  Only 35% of companies have incentives for email subscribers to join their social programs. Further, only 23% seek to build subscribers in the other direction.  Less than one in four organizations has a documented plan to integrate email and social. 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 7 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Segmentation & Personalization 55% of client side marketers are using lead source to personalize/segment their mailings, while 53% are using demographic data. While fewer than half of markets are using behavior for email personalization, it‟s the area of highest interest. Nearly one in four reports having a plan in place to implement some level of behavioral analysis in the next year.Other Areas of Inquiry Email automation is rated as effective by nearly 80% of client-side marketers. Using stages of the buying cycle as the basis for automation is the highest rated trigger, with 83% calling it somewhat or very effective. Respondents identify email benchmarks – open rate, clickthrough rate and conversion rate – for lead generation and ecommerce marketers in B2B and B2C, distinguishing between newsletters and sales oriented emails. Content marketing is the second largest element of the email budget for most organizations, following the spending on email service providers.2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 8All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 3. Email in Action3.1. Challenges to Email Figure 1: Challenges to Future Success in Email Competition with social media for recipients 25% 50% 18% 8% time and attention Getting the budget and attention email 21% 44% 27% 8% programs deserve Measuring and proving the ROI of email 19% 40% 32% 10% marketing programs Young people abandoning email as a 18% 51% 13% 18% primary channel Integrating email with other marketing 17% 44% 35% 4% channels 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Very challenging Somewhat challenging Easy to overcome Background noise Number of respondents:239 The environment is changing for personal, commercial and business communications. It‟s changing at different speeds across age groups and industries, but all are feeling the expansion of social media and mobility into the lives of their customers. Marketers are aware of these shifts, and their effect on email. “Competition with social media for time and attention” rates as the top challenge cited by respondents. More specifically the movement of young people away from email toward other types of communication rates highly as well, with 69% considering it very or somewhat challenging. For many, however, the issue isn‟t some systemic change they can‟t affect. Even though email is the most well established marketing channel in digital marketing, there continue to be issues in budgeting, measurement and integration. 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 9 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 2: Clients’ Use of Email: The Agency View How would you describe your clients’ use of email in the marketing mix? 35% 32% 30% 28% 26% 25% 20% 15% 13% 10% 5% 2% 0% Use of email is Use of email is Their use of email Their use of email Their use of email increasing quickly increasingly is holding steady is slowly is rapidly slowly diminishing diminishing Number of respondents:120The view of email from the agency side is essentially positive, with 60% reporting that their clients areincreasing their use of email to some extent. However, looking at the historical trend, there is somemodest decline in the rate of growth, and an increase in the organizations reducing their use of themedium.2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 10All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 3.2. Email and Social Figure 3: Social and Email Integration Including social sharing icons (FB, Twitter, 69% 13% 18% etc.) in emails Content that is unique to email (doesnt appear 67% 6% 27% in social channels) Content that is unique to social channels 58% 8% 34% (doesnt appear in email) Incentives for email subscribers to join your 35% 14% 51% social programs Documented plan around integrating email and 24% 33% 43% social Incentives in social channels to subscribe to 23% 19% 58% your emails programs 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Yes Plan in place to start doing this No Number of respondents:239 Social marketing has represented such a phenomenon in digital that all other tactics have been evaluated in its reflection. With the rise of social-commercial relationships, the questions became whether Facebook would displace opt-in email in some circumstances and whether the two mediums would work together in others. The answer to both is yes. At its best, digital offers the consumer choice – if they prefer Twitter to email to get sales notices, they should have the option. Typically, though, no one channel solves every preference. Receipts and account notifications belong in email, while less private communications find a home in social media. For most organizations, “social sharing” means little more than including the obligatory icons from Facebook and Twitter (69%, with another 13% planning to implement). It‟s a simple, necessary response, but doesn‟t address the larger issues about what subscribers want, what they know and what you want them to know. Even though most organizations are creating content that is unique to each channel, it‟s not likely that they have a plan in place to use that value to cross-promote the programs. For example, only 23% of companies with both an email and social program have any sort of incentive for social channel followers to subscribe to the email program. The problem is top –down; less than a quarter of companies have a strategy around integrating these two channels, though B2C marketers [Figure 4] are far more likely to have a plan in place, or to be planning one. 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 11 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 4: Social and Email Integration (B2C) Including social sharing icons (FB, Twitter, etc.) 76% 9% 15% in emails Content that is unique to email (doesnt appear 69% 5% 26% in social channels) Content that is unique to social channels 64% 7% 28% (doesnt appear in email) Incentives for email subscribers to join your 43% 11% 47% social programs Documented plan around integrating email and 30% 28% 42% social Incentives in social channels to subscribe to 30% 14% 56% your emails programs 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Yes Plan in place to start doing this No Number of respondents:118Figure 5: Social and Email Integration (B2B) Including social sharing icons (FB, Twitter, 63% 14% 23% etc.) in emails Content that is unique to email (doesnt appear 55% 10% 35% in social channels) Content that is unique to social channels 44% 12% 44% (doesnt appear in email) Incentives for email subscribers to join your 26% 17% 57% social programs Incentives in social channels to subscribe to 17% 20% 63% your emails programs Documented plan around integrating email and 14% 37% 49% social 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Yes Plan in place to start doing this No Number of respondents:1312012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 12All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 3.3. Testing and Tracking Figure 6: Email Factors Tested Offers / calls to action 31% 36% 14% 19% Subject lines 31% 40% 10% 19% Creative copy / layouts 23% 44% 11% 22% Landing pages 19% 34% 18% 29% Send time / day of week 17% 39% 17% 27% From lines 13% 30% 12% 45% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Test regularly Test occasionally Plan to test No testing plan Number of respondents:239 All marketers are overworked and understaffed. This is especially true for the people running email campaigns, who are very likely to have multiple areas of responsibility. So, it‟s not remarkable that testing hasn‟t become standard operating procedure for most organizations. They test when they can, using the best information they have. Marketers know that testing works, the question is simply whether the resources are in place to put a testing program in place. Cheap, reliable analytics and experience have led marketers to focus on the tests that have the greatest impact, while being the easiest to perform. These are typically tests of offers/calls to action and subject lines. At the next level, marketers can consider opportunities that have a greater potential to affect conversion, but may require more data, more tests and expanded test plan in comparison with some of the standard campaign level tests;  Landing page optimization to increase direct conversion.  Long cycle, automated communications to nurture leads and retain existing customers.  Tests to content that is important because it gets reused or repeated, such as templates, and registration forms. 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 13 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 7: Email Factors Tested (B2C) Subject lines 39% 38% 7% 16% Offers / calls to action 37% 32% 16% 16% Creative copy / layouts 25% 44% 12% 20% Landing pages 22% 34% 16% 28% Send time / day of week 17% 41% 18% 24% From lines 16% 28% 9% 46% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Test regularly Test occasionally Plan to test No testing plan Number of respondents:118Figure 8: Email Factors Tested (B2B) Offers / calls to action 28% 38% 16% 19% Subject lines 25% 40% 15% 20% Creative copy / layouts 20% 44% 14% 22% Send time / day of week 17% 36% 17% 30% Landing pages 13% 30% 27% 31% From lines 9% 30% 19% 42% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Test regularly Test occasionally Plan to test No testing plan Number of respondents:1312012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 14All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 9: Email Metrics Tracked Which of the following email performance metrics does your organization track?100% 90% 89% 78% 80% 60% 57% 41% 40% 29% 20% 7% 0% Open rate Clickthrough Deliverability Conversion Response Clickstream Other rate rate rate by variation by data from marketing list segment email clicks channel Number of respondents:239Figure 9 illustrates a central challenge for many email marketers; the metrics they have available tella limited story. Open and clickthrough rates are useful, but they only describe what happens at thesurface of an interaction. To know whether email (or any channel) has an impact to the bottom line,analytics have to engage with conversion and its influences.Regardless of their target market, most organizations track the „big three‟ email metrics, but there‟sconsiderable drop off for the deeper measures of success. For example, less than one in threeorganizations has an idea of the aggregate clickstream from email. Less than 60% know how emailconversion compares with other channels, and even this measure is incomplete because in mostcases, it‟s only a look at conversions that occurred in a direct line from the click. It typically misses thereality of online (and many offline) purchases, which result from a combination of marketing touches.The practice of marketing attribution is starting to build a picture for some organizations about thecomplexities of the customer journey, and how it is influenced by marketing. Email, specifically, hasoften been underestimated by approaches that credit the first or last interaction with the sale. Email,the ultimate „helper‟ tactic, does the heavy lifting of increasing engagement, showcasing products andretention, often without appropriate credit.2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 15All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 10: Email Metrics Tracked (B2C) Which of the following email performance metrics does your organization track? 100% 93% 92% 83% 80% 63% 60% 44% 40% 30% 20% 9% 0% Open rate Clickthrough Deliverability Conversion Response Clickstream Other rate rate rate by variation by data from marketing list segment email clicks channel Number of respondents:1182012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 16All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 11: Email Metrics Tracked (B2B) Which of the following email performance metrics does your organization track? 100% 92% 85% 80% 73% 60% 53% 40% 40% 28% 20% 8% 0% Open rate Clickthrough Deliverability Conversion Response Clickstream Other rate rate rate by variation by data from marketing list segment email clicks channel Number of respondents:1312012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 17All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 3.4. Budgeting and Financial Metrics Figure 12: Email Budget Distribution Other 7% Data hygiene/ Email Service Deliverability Provider (ESP) 8% 31% Analytics 9% Agency (creative & strategy) 12% Content creation Lists 19% 14% Number of respondents:239 Figure 12 breaks down the average budget distribution of the email budget. These averages provide a rough guideline for each element of the email budget viewed in aggregate. Of course, every budget is different; some organizations use in house technology, others spend nothing for lists, or far more on content. Both B2B and B2C marketers spend roughly one third of their email budgets on their email service providers. Consumer marketers are more likely to spend on an additional agency for creative and/or strategic service, and spend roughly the same amount (15%) as they do on content creation (14%). Content creation represents a larger share for B2B marketers (22%), their second largest investment. 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 18 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 13: Email Budget Distribution (B2C) Other Data hygiene/ 4% Deliverability 8% Email Service Provider (ESP) 33% Analytics 10% Lists 13% Agency (creative Content creation & strategy) 14% 15% Number of respondents:118Figure 14: Email Budget Distribution (B2B) Other 7% Analytics 7% Email Service Provider (ESP) Data hygiene/ 31% Deliverability 9% Agency (creative & strategy) 9% Lists 15% Content creation 22% Number of respondents:1312012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 19All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 15: Financial Metrics Tracked Is your organization tracking the following financial metrics related to email marketing? 70% 63% 60% 51% 49% 50% 39% 40% 30% 26% 20% 10% 0% ROI Email click-to- Acquisition cost Revenue per Customer lifetime purchase email value of email conversion rate recipients Number of respondents:239As in the case of the deeper performance metrics [Figures 9-11], many marketers operate emailprograms without the benefit of real knowledge about their effectiveness. Roughly half have access toclick to conversion metrics, and to acquisition costs, arguably the most important. There‟s a drop offfor revenue per email, and another for lifetime value (which tends to be obscure for B2B marketers,though there‟s not a significant difference in measuring this metric between target markets).2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 20All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 16: Financial Metrics Tracked (B2C) Is your organization tracking the following financial metrics related to email marketing? 80% 70% 68% 58% 56% 60% 48% 50% 40% 30% 27% 20% 10% 0% ROI Email click-to- Acquisition cost Revenue per Customer lifetime purchase email value of email conversion rate recipients Number of respondents:118Figure 17: Financial Metrics Tracked (B2B) Is your organization tracking the following financial metrics related to email marketing? 70% 60% 58% 50% 43% 42% 40% 29% 30% 24% 20% 10% 0% ROI Email click-to- Acquisition cost Revenue per Customer lifetime purchase email value of email conversion rate recipients Number of respondents:1312012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 21All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 3.5. Email Benchmarks Benchmarks are highly fallible. Every company and every product produce metrics that are unique to them. To attempt to make these benchmarks as useful as possible, they are associated with three different variables; goal, sales target and type of email. Figure 18: B2C Lead Generation – Newsletter Benchmarks 30% 25% 24% 18% 12% 11% 6% 1.8% 0% Newsletter Open Rate Newsletter Clickthrough Newsletter Conversion Rate Rate Number of respondents:118 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 22 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 19: B2C Lead Generation – Sales Email Benchmarks 24% 18% 18% 12% 6% 5% 1.5% 0% Sales Email Open Rate Sales Email Clickthrough Sales Conversion Rate Rate Number of respondents:118Figure 20: B2B Lead Generation – Newsletter Benchmarks 24% 22% 18% 12% 8% 6% 4.1% 0% Newsletter Open Rate Newsletter Clickthrough Newsletter Conversion Rate Rate Number of respondents:1312012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 23All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 21: B2B Lead Generation – Sales Email Benchmarks 24% 18% 17% 12% 6% 3.9% 3% 0% Sales Email Open Rate Sales Email Clickthrough Sales Conversion Rate Rate Number of respondents:131Figure 22: B2C Direct Sales – Newsletter Benchmarks 24% 18% 16% 12% 6% 5% 1.7% 0% Newsletter Open Rate Newsletter Clickthrough Rate Newsletter Conversion Rate Number of respondents:1182012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 24All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 23: B2C Direct Sales – Sales Email Benchmarks 24% 19% 18% 12% 6% 3% 1.8% 0% Sales Email Open Rate Sales Email Clickthrough Sales Conversion Rate Rate Number of respondents:118Figure 24: B2B Direct Sales – Newsletter Benchmarks 24% 20% 18% 12% 6% 3% 2.1% 0% Newsletter Open Rate Newsletter Clickthrough Newsletter Conversion Rate Rate Number of respondents:1312012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 25All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 25: B2B Direct Sales – Sales Email Benchmarks 24% 18% 16% 12% 6% 4% 1.4% 0% Sales Email Open Rate Sales Email Clickthrough Sales Conversion Rate Rate Number of respondents:1312012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 26All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 26: Definitions of InactivityMore than 18 months inactive 11% 16-18 months inactive 1% 13-15 months inactive 5% 10-12 months inactive 6% 7-9 months inactive 5% 151 -180 days inactive 6% 121-150 days inactive 3% 91-120 days inactive 8% 61-90 days inactive 7% 30-60 days inactive 4% <30 days inactive 1% No set definition 43% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Number of respondents:239Inactivity is a definition that many email marketers use to identify and segment those subscribersthat haven‟t clicked or opened in a set period of time. As Figure 26 shows, there is no industrystandard, nor can there be. The inactivity rate is a subjective look at a unique relationship. Butsubjective doesn‟t mean unimportant. Marketers have learned that a clean list of people whoparticipate is worth far more than one full of active names.In general, it‟s more challenging for business to business marketers to accurately ascribe an inactivedesignation than on the consumer side. Longer sales cycles and less frequent mailings contribute to amuch longer average definition of inactivity. While B2C marketers may define inactivity as early as30-60 days (though most do not), those in B2B are more likely to allow six months or more.Inactivity isn‟t an issue for all marketers – some companies find that a long passive period is simplythe nature of their business. Ticket sellers, educators and automobile dealers are examples ofbusinesses for which inactivity may be moot. However, for many of the 43% that aren‟t using thismeasure, it could be valuable. The point is not to use the ranges above as a benchmark, but to beginthe process of determining what inactivity means for their businesses.2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 27All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 3.6. Personalization & Segmentation Figure 27: Factors in Personalization/Segmentation Yes Planned in near future No Lead source (search, specific media, trade 55% 13% 32% event, etc.) Demographic data (age, gender, region, etc.) 53% 10% 36% Behavior (recent purchase, time on site, 49% 24% 27% pages viewed, etc.) Business information (company size, title, 46% 9% 45% role, etc.) 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Number of respondents:239 Customizing of emails to specific audiences works. Repeated studies and interviews with email marketers consistently reveal that segmentation is a direct path to improved return, engagement and list activity. Companies that practice segmentation tend to add new segments over time, so there‟s quite a bit of overlap among the companies using different types in Figure 27, above. Some of the lifecycle segments that are easy to create and worth trying include;  New subscribers – going beyond the simple “welcome message” to a full welcome program that builds engagement and encourages interaction.  Recent purchasers – depending on the product type, some marketers have found that one purchase begets the next, especially if they are smartly associated.  Inactive for X amount of time – tying in with Figure 26, marketers should identify inactives, segment and try to reengage with them, and ultimately consider removing them from the list. 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 28 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 28: Factors in Personalization/Segmentation (B2C) Yes Planned in near future No Demographic data (age, gender, region, etc.) 67% 10% 23% Lead source (search, specific media, trade 55% 9% 35% event, etc.) Behavior (recent purchase, time on site, pages 54% 20% 26% viewed, etc.) Business information (company size, title, role, 22% 7% 71% etc.) 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Number of respondents:118Figure 29: Factors in Personalization/Segmentation (B2B) Yes Planned in near future No Business information (company size, title, role, 71% 13% 16% etc.) Lead source (search, specific media, trade 63% 15% 21% event, etc.) Behavior (recent purchase, time on site, pages 46% 28% 26% viewed, etc.) Demographic data (age, gender, region, etc.) 35% 9% 56% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Number of respondents:1182012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 29All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 30: Preferences Offered to Subscribers We offer this We dont offer this, but its planned No plans to offer this Format (HTML or text) 65% 10% 25% Content (topics, news vs. sales info, etc.) 58% 16% 26% Mobile version 25% 37% 37% Delivery preferences (frequency, day of week, 18% 22% 60% etc.) 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Number of respondents:239For all the technology that gets applied in marketers‟ attempts to decode, influence and predictcustomer behavior, often the best way to understand what people want is to ask them. Preferencecenters are common, but generally underwhelming, offering choices that are anemic or irrelevant tomost subscribers.Choice in format and device are elementary and should be standard. The real opportunity for learningcomes from choice in content. Content heavy industries have tended to be better at offering variationsin email, but the opportunity is there across sectors.In B2C, generally speaking, people want to discover – new products, new content, trends, etc. – butthey already have multiple sources for these at a high level. The trick is to create content streams thatplay to the organization‟s commercial strength, while offering a unique angle at discovery, educationand entertainment. The strength of daily deal programs has been to swaddle deep discounts in anentertaining method for discovering new products.For B2B marketers, education is frequently the key to a successful email relationship. Working fromcore competencies, B2B emailers have had success when they work to genuinely inform instead ofdirectly influence. Different content lines can be created around subscribers‟ roles, industries orneeds, for example.In general, it may not be wise to offer full control over frequency, because that may limit themarketer‟s ability to be relevant. However, one simple option is to give users who are about tounsubscribe the option to receive email less frequently. This can revive the relationship while givingthe customer what they want.2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 30All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 31: Preferences Offered to Subscribers (B2C) We offer this We dont offer this, but its planned No plans to offer this Format (HTML or text) 63% 11% 27% Content (topics, news vs. sales info, etc.) 54% 18% 29% Mobile version 28% 33% 40% Delivery preferences (frequency, day of week, 23% 24% 54% etc.) 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Number of respondents:118Figure 32: Preferences Offered to Subscribers (B2B) We offer this We dont offer this, but its planned No plans to offer this Format (HTML or text) 66% 7% 27% Content (topics, news vs. sales info, etc.) 61% 13% 27% Mobile version 19% 45% 36% Delivery preferences (frequency, day of week, 11% 20% 69% etc.) 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Number of respondents:1312012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 31All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 3.7. List Size and Growth Figure 33: Changes in List Size How would you describe the general growth trend of your email list(s)? 60% 49% 50% 40% 32% 30% 20% 13% 10% 6% 1% 0% Very positive - our Positive - our list Neutral - the gains Negative - our list Very negative - list is growing is growing slowly balance out the is shrinking slowly our list is quickly losses shrinking quickly Number of respondents:239 At first glance, Figure 33 suggests that email lists are growing at a healthy, if not aggressive rate. That‟s true to a point, but an analysis of studies conducted in previous years suggests that the pace of growth has slowed. Not long ago, we would have expected as many as half of the marketers responding to report very positive growth, in B2C at least. Several factors may be playing a role;  Maturity/Inbox overload – email is the longest standing of digital channels, and it‟s not surprising that it doesn‟t perform at the same rates it did a decade ago. In some respects, it may be good for the long term health of the industry for the „easy‟ days to be over, so that higher level email marketing has less competition, and end users have a better overall experience with their inbox.  Competition with social channels – as we saw in Figure 1, marketers are keenly aware that social is changing the landscape. That‟s not necessarily a negative; if someone prefers to get their updates via Twitter, what matters most is that the relationship continues. However, marketers should continue to look for symbiotic social-email content strategies to ensure that customers get the best of both.  Mobile turnover – as the digital life becomes increasingly mobile, many people have moved their commercial communications to email alternatives, including branded apps and aggregators, especially for publisher and retailer content. 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 32 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 34: Changes in List Size (B2C) How would you describe the general growth trend of your email list(s)? 60% 54% 50% 40% 30% 27% 20% 14% 10% 5% 0% 0% Very positive - our Positive - our list Neutral - the Negative - our list Very negative - list is growing is growing slowly gains balance out is shrinking slowly our list is quickly the losses shrinking quickly Number of respondents:118Figure 35: Changes in List Size (B2B) How would you describe the general growth trend of your email list(s)? 45% 42% 40% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 9% 10% 7% 5% 2% 0% Very positive - our Positive - our list Neutral - the Negative - our list Very negative - list is growing is growing slowly gains balance out is shrinking slowly our list is quickly the losses shrinking quickly Number of respondents:1312012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 33All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 3.8. Automation Figure 36: Effectiveness of Automated Triggers 100% 8% 5% 5% 7% 90% 9% 12% 12% 15% 80% Very 70% ineffective 60% 45% 46% Somewhat 50% 47% ineffective 50% Somewhat 40% effective 30% Very effective 20% 39% 38% 33% 32% 10% 0% Buying cycle stage Volunteered info User behavior Downloaded content Number of respondents:187 Automation has become increasingly common as technology costs have dropped, and related skills more widespread. It offers marketers twin opportunities; to be more relevant while saving themselves time in creating one-off campaigns. Although automation isn‟t limited to email, it is where most companies take advantage. Email automation is one of the rare areas where B2B companies have led the way. Their need to nurture leads over long cycles makes automation a natural fit. Instead of attempting to keep potential buyers at different stages of the buy cycle happy with standardized content, automation allows companies to deliver messaging and information that is tailored to different stages and different titles. B2C companies were quick to follow. Simple triggered responses to purchases and abandoned carts comprise much of their automation programs, but the possibilities are endless. Automation should be viewed as an opportunity for creativity. Timed emails based on product lifecycles, site pages viewed or other behaviors can massively multiply relevant communications without taxing resources. 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 34 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 37: Effectiveness of Automated Triggers (B2C)100% 4% 3% 4% 5% 8% 8% 90% 15% 21% 80% Very 70% ineffective 40% 48% 60% 46% Somewhat 38% ineffective 50% Somewhat 40% effective 30% Very effective 48% 20% 42% 36% 36% 10% 0% Stage of buying Volunteered info User behavior Downloaded cycle content Number of respondents:84Figure 38: Effectiveness of Automated Triggers (B2B)100% 11% 13% 10% 90% 19% 14% 13% 80% 16% 7% Very ineffective 70% 60% Somewhat 39% 36% 48% ineffective 50% 56% 40% Somewhat effective 30% Very effective 20% 36% 36% 29% 10% 19% 0% User behavior Volunteered info Downloaded Buying cycle stage content Number of respondents:1032012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 35All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 3.9. Improving Email Performance Figure 39: Word Cloud – “What’s the Key to Effective Email?” Number of respondents:239 Figure 39 is a word cloud formed from the open answers of client and agency respondents to a question about the key to effective email (selected answers in full follow on the next page). The themes that appear most frequently are worth highlighting. 1. Data – the most powerful tools at an email marketer‟s disposal are content, segmentation and automation. All of these depend on data; performance data that can identify compelling content and customer needs, user data that informs targeting or strategic data such as attribution that describes the role of email in the customer journey. 2. Integration – marketing is most effective when multiple lines of communication are open. Every tactic brings something unique to the table, and email stands alone as the most customizable, even if the industry doesn‟t always take advantage. Even as social takes over some of the functions of email for some users, marketers should strive for programs that play off one another. 3. Choice – one function of the digital age is that consumers have greater control over their commercial relationships than ever before. Email offers smart marketers a powerful tool for giving subscribers what they want in terms of content and product selection. The essential step is to put the tools in place to understand their choices, including explicit selections via preference center, and implicit needs via behavioral and other technologies. 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 36 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • What’s the number one thing you’d recommend to other companies to improvetheir email marketing performance? “Have clean lists of email addresses. Maintain your lists. Think carefully about your subject lines and copy. Review your metrics to see if you need to improve them.” “Test often and don‟t spend too much time making the HTML design perfect. If the email contains the right message and is delivered at the right time then you‟ll see results.” “Creating meaningful customer / prospect / trigger/ behavior segments and versioning appropriate messaging for each. Testing important variables such as subject line, offers etc. Utilizing best of breed web analytics tools which integrate well with their email programs for web behavioral tracking.” “Deliver better content. It must be at least 90% service/education oriented; 10% product.” “Focus and consistency – plan an email strategy and follow that rather than throwing email tactics at the wall in random fashion.” “Build a good foundation built both on best practices and technical integration with a CRM that can handle robust email marketing. In addition, marketers and C-execs need to be educated as to email marketing in order to approve the right decisions.” “Understand what consumers want to receive by either asking them in survey, preference centers, and/or through measuring results of each campaign and offer.” “Qualifying and grading prospects. You need to know where your prospects are when it comes to your sales funnel. Without some level of tracking, you‟re just using a shotgun approach that will eventually fail you. In time your e-mails will stop being relevant and you will be looked at as a spammer.” “Data cleanliness and accuracy must be priority one. A beautiful creative with the right message cannot succeed when combined with bad data.” “Consider a fully integrated solution set, with email as one core component, not a siloed activity.” Client-side respondentsWhen designing campaigns for your clients, have you found the role of emailchanging in the past two years? If yes, please describe how. “Balance of getting more information on subscribers to send more personalized email vs. growing the list just to increase numbers.” “Clients are looking more and more to email because of the lower cost compared to hardy copy touches. More rigor and planning must be put into email strategies now more than ever because of the volume of email hitting inboxes every day.” “Now we are able to take advantage of more features and higher level campaign logic which allows our clients to have better one-on-one communication with their customers. Email can now also be integrated with social media so that conversation is moving beyond the inbox.” “Due to the numerous challenges can bring to a client, they have started to explore and utilize internal bandwidth much more on other channels, mostly exploring the social and mobile arenas, especially clients with a younger demographic that is NOT using email as a primary communication platform.” Supply-side respondents 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 37 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • When designing campaigns for your clients, have you found the role of emailchanging in the past two years? If yes, please describe how. “Can‟t rely on it as much for broad messaging because people like it less and less due to more and more companies spamming to save on traditional marketing (direct mail, phone etc.).” “More integration with social media and importance of offering a mobile friendly email. Also, more emphasis on lifecycle email marketing and making use of automated emails based on website behavior or consumer data provided (e.g. birthday email).” “Now they can measure email they think that if they send more it will continue to pay off. What they don‟t focus on is the damage if may do to the relationship. Just because you can doesn‟t mean you should. Too much emphasis on sales and not enough on why you should do business with them in the first place. Customer experience is still not great.” “It has been increasingly easy to prove that email alone does not work for a lot of industries. They must target it with other channels and only to the people who want their communication via email.” “Email is becoming more of a central tool to promote multichannel marketing campaigns rather than a standalone tool.” “It is more of a sales support tool. It rarely generates the leads but nurtures interest so that other channels like phone calls, direct mail and exhibiting work better.” “The content is longer, more editorial. It‟s difficult to coordinate email content with web and social media delivery – you don‟t want to say the same thing in three places, but you also don‟t want to ignore the people that only get their info via one of the three channels.” “Email can be much more targeted than it used to. With the automation tools we have, we have so much more information on our prospects and can send them email when it‟s appropriate and more valuable rather than just when it suits us.” “Fads come and go, but the use of email has held on because of its format. You no longer use email for viral purposes, but to engage... send codes, send cool stuff... email is an excellent CRM tool. It certainly feels more secure than social networks now.” “The growth of mobile has changed the way we think about email campaigns. Specifically, the environment in which the recipient will likely be in when he or she receives the email is now very important, and that has an effect on what their next action might be.” Supply-side respondents 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 38 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • 4. Methodology and Respondent Demographics Figure 40: Respondent Organizations by Type What phrase best describes the type of organization you work for? 45% 40% 39% 35% 31% 30% 25% 20% 20% 15% 10% 7% 5% 4% 0% Client side Agency or Other type of Email Service Institution marketer consultancy organization Provider (government, military or educational) Number of respondents:467 2012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 39 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 41: Size of Respondent Organizations How many employees are in your organization worldwide? 30% 25% 25% 23% 22% 20% 19% 15% 10% 7% 5% 4% 0% 1-10 11-100 101-500 501-1000 1001-2,000 More than employees employees employees employees employees 2,000 employees Number of respondents:239Figure 42: Target Markets of Respondent Organizations Which type of customer is the primary target of your organization’s email marketing? 60% 50% 50% 40% 30% 23% 20% 12% 12% 10% 0% Consumers Small to mid-size Large businesses or True mix of consumer businesses or organizations with and business targets organizations with 1,000 or more fewer than 1,000 employees employees Number of respondents:2392012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 40All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 43: Respondents’ Primary Conversion Goal Which of the following best describes the "conversions" or primary goals of your email programs? 35% 29% 30% 25% 25% 19% 20% 15% 10% 7% 7% 6% 6% 5% 0% Lead Immediate Specific Later offline Later online Time on site Other generated purchase action purchase purchase goal or (form online (phone call, multiple completed) used an pages application, viewed etc.) Number of respondents:239Figure 44: Respondents’ Database Size (B2C) How large is your total email database of names? 45% 41% 40% 35% 30% 26% 25% 20% 15% 15% 12% 10% 5% 5% 0% Fewer than 5,000 5,000 to 24,999 25,000 to 99,999 100,000 to More than 500,000 500,000 Number of respondents:1182012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 41All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012
    • Figure 45: Respondents’ Database Size (B2B) How large is your total email database of names? 35% 31% 30% 24% 25% 20% 20% 15% 15% 9% 10% 5% 0% Fewer than 5,000 5,000 to 24,999 25,000 to 99,999 100,000 to More than 500,000 500,000 Number of respondents:1312012: Email in Action A US study by the Email Experience Council of the DMA and Econsultancy Page 42All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage andretrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2012