V Rolfe - Open Education in Life Sciences - 27th July 2012

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Presentation for the SLOAN Consortium and MERLOT Annual Conference on 27th July 2012 in Las Vegas. An overview of open education activities in the Faculty of Health and Life Science at De Montfort University by Viv Rolfe.

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V Rolfe - Open Education in Life Sciences - 27th July 2012

  1. 1. “Buns and burners”OPEN STEM EDUCATION in the UK (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics)
  2. 2. 5th Annual International Symposium for Emerging Technologies for Online Learning July 25-27, 2012The Venetian | Palazzo Resort - Las Vegas, Nevada 50 minute presentation by: Dr Viv Rolfe BSc PhD National Teacher Fellow
  3. 3. Hello Vegas! Boy I’ve always wanted to say that! I’m a Principal Lecturer in Anatomy and Physiology at De Montfort University in the UK. I develop and use animations and multimedia resources to support student learning, and am a great advocate of OPEN EDUCATION and the sharing of these resources globally to support ALL LEARNERS. I’m looking forward to my trip to Vegas, and then on to Boston and Newport. I just wish I could have brought my horn with me!
  4. 4. With the exception of the institutional LOGOSall materials in this presentation are openly licensed for use:CC – BYPlease attribute Dr Vivien Rolfe, De Montfort University
  5. 5. • De Montfort University• Education establishment since 1870• 25,000 students• Arts, Science, Business and Law, Technology• The Queen visited in March 2012!
  6. 6. Outline 1. UK OER and higher education landscape 2. Why support STEM subjects? (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics) 3. DMU Research and activities A. Student experience of OER B. How to creating the best OER C. Promoting discovery and open technology D. Growth and other STEM initiatives 4. Summary
  7. 7. LANDSCAPE
  8. 8. Outline 1. UK OER and higher education landscape 2. Why support STEM subjects? (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics) 3. DMU Research and activities A. Student experience of OER B. How to create the best OER C. Promoting discovery and open technology D. Growth and other STEM initiatives 4. Summary
  9. 9. UK Higher Education (HE) • 500,000 entrants each year • 2.5 million in total in HE • 400,000 total from outside the UKUniversities UK 2012
  10. 10. Open Education in the UK• Government-funded Jorum.ac.uk UK Open Educational Resource Programme UKOER• £11.8 million• 3 phases 2009, 2010, 2011• Open University SCORE Fellowships• JORUM national repository
  11. 11. Open Education in the UK• Open University – 600 courses online• Oxford’s iTunes U materials – over 12 million downloads• From De Montfort: – STEM – life science focus – Over 500 courses, learning objects, videos, animations, podcasts and 1000’s of individual assets – Estimated 30,000 global visitors to our websites viewing 100,000 pages
  12. 12. Outline 1. UK OER and higher education landscape 2. Why support STEM subjects? (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics) 3. DMU Research and activities A. Student experience of OER B. How to create the best OER C. Promoting discovery and open technology D. Growth and other STEM initiatives 4. Summary
  13. 13. Why Support STEM?Science, technology, engineering and mathematics "STEM skills are vital for UK business competitiveness, but they are in short supply. Over the next three years more than half of employers expect to have difficulties recruiting staff with these skills.“ (CBI 2011)
  14. 14. Problems “STEM” from Schools • University science students often have no lab experience from school (Rolfe 2009). “A lot of titrations and buns and burner experiments. Very difficult”. • Graduate lab skills deficit as highlighted by professional bodies. “Practical skills; graduates need excellent laboratory and technical skills” (ABPI 2008, CBI 2010).
  15. 15. Potential Audience for OER • 1 in 5 students study “lab science” in UK HE so potential for impact is huge, and then multiply globally!
  16. 16. Outline 1. UK OER and higher education landscape 2. Why support STEM subjects? (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics) 3. DMU Research and activities A. Student experience of OER B. How to create the best OER C. Promoting discovery and open technology D. Growth and other STEM initiatives 4. Summary
  17. 17. DMU Research and Activity 2009 VAL Lab skills UKOER Funding Phase 1 2010 SCOOTER Blood disorders UKOER Phase 2 2011 HALS Medical sciences, forensic sciences, nursing, midwifery UKOER Phase 3
  18. 18. Outline 1. UK OER and higher education landscape 2. Why support STEM subjects? (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics) 3. DMU Research and activities A. Student experience of OER B. How to create the best OER C. Promoting discovery and open technology D. Growth and other STEM initiatives 4. Summary
  19. 19. Student Experiences • Research on the student OER experience is lacking (Bacsich et al 2011). • VAL improved knowledge gain and confidence of science students before going into the lab (Rolfe 2009).
  20. 20. “The future for learning”. (Student) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tj6I7wN6zNI&feature=plcp
  21. 21. • "It is excellent to see such hard work being distributed throughout the world for free. These resources are of very high quality and are valuable adjuncts to education. I feel proud of the fact that I study at De Montfort University". (Student in 2010).• “It would be a good thing because some of the information here might be explained differently from another tutor at another university” (Student in 2010).
  22. 22. • “I know it sounds really cheeky but we live in a day and age where we’ve got to pay for it, why should everybody else get it free”. (Student in 2012).• “It depends what materials are shared. If it’s full course material then I don’t think that’s right. Any student studying and paying fees, those fees are being paid for access £30K for a 3 year to that course material”. degree course! (Student in 2012).
  23. 23. Learner Perceptions – shifting? • Students LIKE OER and LIKE the concept. • With increases in fees students seem more cautious about sharing materials THEY have paid for. • But OER can offer new educational models and solutions.
  24. 24. Outline 1. UK OER and higher education landscape 2. Why support STEM subjects? (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics) 3. DMU Research and activities A. Student experience of OER B. How to create the best OER C. Promoting discovery and open technology D. Growth and other STEM initiatives 4. Summary
  25. 25. How to Create the BEST OER Use (unchanged) Discovery Publication ImprovementNathan Yergler 2010
  26. 26. Building External Collaborations • We work with public and private sector - Leicestershire Police Constabulary, the National Health Service and the publishing industry with Oxford University Press. • OER support employment / employability. • Quality OER based on real-life scenarios. • Collaborators are end-users of OER.
  27. 27. Hospital assets / dataPathology slides from theLeicester Royal InfirmaryUsed for university- DMUbiomedical science teaching Creates OERUsed for traineebiomedical scientistsin the hospital Shared benefits
  28. 28. Out ofpublication text book DMU release with CreativeGiven with kind permission Commonsby Dr Amy LivingstoneWittenberg University Global resource
  29. 29. Fingerprint SocietyFinger print materialsand expert knowledge DMUFor Forensic Sciences Creates OER Shared benefits
  30. 30. Motivation for Involvement External Partner Business Model Leicestershire Constabulary Graduate employability National Health Service Graduate employability / staff continual professional development (CPD) Oxford University Press Business development / quality supplementary information Forensic Focus Business development The Fingerprint Society Maintaining quality of professional materials •Unexpected benefits (research projects, Masters, PhD opportunities; visiting professorships support undergraduate teaching).
  31. 31. Building STEM Communities
  32. 32. Outline 1. UK OER and higher education landscape 2. Why support STEM subjects? (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics) 3. DMU Research and activities A. Student experience of OER B. How to create the best OER C. Promoting discovery and open technology D. Growth and other STEM initiatives 4. Summary
  33. 33. Promoting Discovery • SEO = search engine optimisation. • Means of improving a website’s visibility in the Google (mainly) rankings. • Drive organic traffic (through keywords) and back links (URL on other sites). • Social networking strategy – Facebook, Twitter, Posterous, Pinterest, YouTube. • 2012 changes place importance on authority, profiles, Google + • ££££££££££££££$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
  34. 34. Our “Bite-sized” SEO StrategyRolfe & Griffin 2011
  35. 35. Why Adopt this Approach? • To make OER discoverable. • Alternative to the institutional repository. 165 HE institutions in the UK. Are they open? Who maintains them after project funding stops? • Most users find stuff these days doing a Google search – not by RSS going to repositories (Richard Windle, Nottingham University).
  36. 36. Two Examples SCOOTER UKOER2 HALS UKOER3 Wordpress Direct Blog Wordpress Direct Blog Static OER HTML pages OER Blog articles with RSS feed Basic SEO Enhanced SEO (eZine submissions, press releases) Posterous (Facebook/Twitter/Blogs) Posterous (Facebook/Twitter/Blogs) Google Analytics for basic tracking Enhanced monitoring of site of site performance performance £ Pragmatic and time realistic ££ Enhanced SEO campaign
  37. 37. Reach and Impact of our OER? • E.g. Virtual Analytical Laboratory VAL. • 200 web pages of basic lab skills in multiple file formats. • Evaluation through Google analytics / on-line surveys – WHERE? 21,000 visitors from 134 countries (UK, USA, Australia, Canada, India, Malaysia, Singapore) – BACKLIONKS? Oxford university press – WHO? Stay at home mom. Day care provider. Student. Trash collector. Accountant. Lifeguard. Unemployed. – WHY? “I always wanted to know how a microscope worked”. (Trash collector).
  38. 38. Outline 1. UK OER and higher education landscape 2. Why support STEM subjects? (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics) 3. DMU Research and activities A. Student experience of OER B. How to create the best OER C. Promoting discovery and open technology D. Growth and other STEM initiatives 4. Summary
  39. 39. PROBLEMS with OER • Many resources ARE NOT OPEN! – Unusable technical formats (SCORM packaged, QuestionMarkPerception quizzes). – Lack of instructions for use / unpackaging. – Articulate Presenter files interoperable on iPad. • We need to ensure resources are TECHNICALLY OPEN. What format? What granularity? What technical skills are required?
  40. 40. PROBLEMS with OER • OPEN does not always mean educationally effective: – Whilst a video is a fantastic way of learning, if the video doesn’t contain written information throughout then it can be difficult to remember what it is being told. – The animation with voice over is effective as the learning outcomes are present so you can relate back to them at the end and see if you have achieved what you wanted to. (Dyslexic Student, 2012) • Ensure OPEN means EDUCATIONALLY EFFECTIVE.
  41. 41. PROBLEMS with MEDICAL OER • Becomes outdated. • How to make sensitive material “open”? E.g. autopsy photographs, death and palliative care OER all unreleased. • Extra scrutiny of materials ©, patient confidentiality and data protection. • Ensure OER is HEALTHY.
  42. 42. Growth and other STEM initiatives • 6 month Commonwealth research fellowship exchange with University of Ibadan, Nigera to develop a sickle cell health-promotion game. • Sickle cell schools resources translated into Portugese, Spanish and Italian. • VAL part of UK ESTEEM Project (£1 million).
  43. 43. Outline 1. UK OER and higher education landscape 2. Why support STEM subjects? (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics) 3. DMU Research and activities A. Student experience of OER B. How to create the best OER C. Promoting discovery and open technology D. Growth and other STEM initiatives 4. Summary
  44. 44. 4. Summary Enhance Support science TO STEM Quality of and THROUGH graduates education UK / Global university Students buy-in Websites Sensitive to fees and what should be OER VAL VAL improves knowledge gain & confidence SCOOTER HALS External collaborators – quality OER; local networks; employability
  45. 45. 4. Summary Enhance Support science TO and Quality of STEM THROUGH university education graduates UK / Global Use SEO to build global networks. More fragile, less dialogue. Monitor impact on learning? Websites VAL Multiple formats for longevity, SCOOTER accessibility, interoperability. HALS NEW ROUTES FOR DISCOVERY? APPS? Apple Newsstand Android Newsstand / Market Place
  46. 46. References • ABPI 2008. Skills needs for biomedical research. Available July 2012: http://www.abpi.org.uk/our-work/library/industry/Documents/skills-biomedical-research.pdf • Bacsich P 2011. Learner voice literature review. Available July 2012: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearning/oer2/LearnerVoice.aspx • CBI 2010. Set for growth. Available July 2012: http://www.cbi.org.uk/media/935312/2010.08-set-for-growth.pdf • CBI 2011. Building for growth. Business priorities for education and skills. Available July 2012: http://www.cbi.org.uk/media/1051530/cbi__edi_education___skills_survey_2011.pdf • HALS (Health and Life Science Open Educational Resources). Available July 2012: http://www.biologycourses.co.uk • Rolfe V 2009. Development of a Virtual Analytical Laboratory (VAL) multimedia resource to support student transition to laboratory science at university. Available July 2012: www.bioscience.heacademy.ac.uk/ftp/casestudies/VRolfe.pdf
  47. 47. References • Rolfe V and Griffin SJ (2011). A Guide to SEO http://www.sicklecellanaemia.org/teaching-resources/resources/scooter80/SCOOTER80a_SEO_Guid • Rolfe V, Fowler M and Dyson S (2011). Sickle cell in the university curriculum. Available July 2012: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/rmp/dhc/2011/00000008/00000004/art00006 • SCOOTER (Sickle Cell Open – Online Topics and Educational Resources). Available July 2012: http://www.sicklecellanaemia.org • Universities UK 2012. Overview of the HE sector. Available July 2012: http://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/UKHESector/Pages/OverviewSector.aspx • VAL (Virtual Analytical Laboratory). Available July 2012: http://www.tinyurl.com/oerval • Yergler NR 2010. Search and Discovery : OERs Open Loop. Available July 2012: http://openaccess.uoc.edu/webapps/o2/handle/10609/4852
  48. 48. Thank You’sStaff and students Collaborators Funding Leicestershire Police
  49. 49. Thank You Vegas! Twitter @DMUViv Facebook Viv Rolfe Email vrolfe@dmu.ac.uk YouTube Channels Biology Courses Belvoir Academy

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