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20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
20080418   01   Motivation   1   Concepts, Approaches & Theories   Apgenco   Vijayawada   60s
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20080418 01 Motivation 1 Concepts, Approaches & Theories Apgenco Vijayawada 60s

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  • 1.  
  • 2. MOTIVATION Prof. V. Viswanadham
  • 3. WHO ARE WE ?
  • 4. WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO ?
  • 5. HOW WELL WE DO WHAT WE DO ?
  • 6. CAN WE DO IT BETTER ?
  • 7. DO WE DO WHAT WE DO WITH LOVE ?
  • 8. WHAT IS NATURE'S NATURE ?
  • 9. WHAT IS OUR NATURE ?
  • 10. DO WE LIKE OTHERS WHO ARE SELFISH ?
  • 11. WHY ARE WE SELFISH ?
  • 12. DO WE LIKE THOSE WHO ADOPT DOUBLE STANDARDS ?
  • 13. WHY DO WE ADOPT DOUBLE STANDARDS ?
  • 14. HOW CAN WE EXPLAIN ALL THIS ?
  • 15. MOTIVATION ATTEMPTS TO EXPLAIN
  • 16. M A X I M I S A T I O N
  • 17. MI N I M I S A T I O N
  • 18. EVERYONE WANTS ALL OTHERS TO BE WELL MOTIVATED
  • 19. HOW WELL ARE YOU MOTIVATED ?
  • 20. WHAT MOTIVATES YOU ?
  • 21. WHY GET MOTIVATED ?
  • 22. WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF GETTING MOTIVATED ?
  • 23. What Is Motivation?
    • Motivation
      • Is complex because it is the term we use to explain human behavior
      • Is related to a person's inner impulses
      • Is closely associated with his/her values
    • Motivation gives direction and intensity
    • to a person's behavior
      • It significantly affects his/her abilities and achievement
  • 24. What Is Motivation?
    • 2. Motivation describes those processes that:
      • a. Arouse and instigate behavior
      • b. Give direction or purpose to behavior
      • c. Continue to allow behavior to persist
      • d. Lead to choosing or preferring a particular behavior
  • 25. Every person has needs that they desire to satisfy. The desire to satisfy the needs ~ Leads to actions that will fulfill their needs. The performance of need fulfilling actions ~ Leads to rewards from the employer, retention in the job, promotion after sometime and satisfaction from doing the job. The satisfaction and the reward yielding job Reinforces the actions and causes them to be repeated.
  • 26. Primary Principles of Motivation
    • 1. Interest has original source in natural impulses-
      • a. activity
      • b. love of nature
      • c. curiosity
      • d. desire for approval
      • e. creativeness
      • f. self advancement
      • g. competition, etc.
  • 27. Primary Principles of Motivation
    • 2. If it affects ourselves, it also affects those around us or humanity
    • 3. Interest increases with knowledge
    • 4. Interest increases with increased ability or skill
    • 5. Interest flows from one area
    • to another if the two are
    • clearly connected in thought
  • 28. Motivation is Everybody’s Problem Your children, particularly teenagers won’t do the assigned homework; or, not performing well in studies. You are a wife and you want to motivate your husband to stop smoking, or drinking, or to loose weight.
  • 29. Motivation is Everybody’s Problem Your superiors or supervisors are always on your tail – and you need to motivate them to get off. You are the group leader and you need to get things Done to meet the targets fixed. There are breakdowns, shutdowns, and problems everywhere. Continuous tension. We don’t seem to know where we are going.
  • 30. Importance of Motivation
    • In general:
      • It allows us to alter an individual’s behavior.
      • We use it daily in interactions with other people.
  • 31. Importance of Motivation
    • In general:
      • It allows us to guide people
      • into seeking the goals – outcomes we want them to seek.
  • 32. Importance of Motivation
    • In general:
      • We need to understand when and why we are being motivated.
  • 33. Importance of Motivation
    • Work Related:
      • Motivated and satisfied (“happy”) workers
      • lead to “happy” customers,
      • and “happy” customers lead to
      • successful businesses.
      • Unmotivated “Unhappy” workers:
          • Have low morale
          • Are absent more often
          • Are not as productive, innovative, or committed
          • May perform below standard
          • Complacency
          • Stress
          • Aggression
          • Indiscipline, strikes, agitations, Etc.
  • 34. Motivation The inner state causing an individual to behave in a way that ensures goal accomplishment.
  • 35. Motivation in an organization is shaped and directed by the relationship between managers and employees.
  • 36. Without motivation there is no change. No learning. No action. And, most important of all, without motivation there are no results.
  • 37. Motivational Theories explore what drives people to behave in certain ways.
  • 38. The Motivation Process – people go from need to motive to behavior to consequence to satisfaction or dissatisfaction
  • 39. Model of Motivation NEED-Creates desire to fulfill needs (food, friendship, recognition, achievement). BEHAVIOR-Results in actions to fulfill needs. REWARDS-Satisfy needs; intrinsic or extrinsic rewards. FEEDBACK-Reward informs person whether behavior was appropriate and should be used again.
  • 40. Herzberg’s Motivation/Hygiene Theory
    • Identified two distinct job factors
      • Satisfiers
      • Dissatisfiers
  • 41.
    • SATISFIERS :
      • Things that fulfill the need to experience psychological growth through achievement
      • (Job Content factors/Growth needs):
      • Used to increase employee motivation
      • Dissatisfiers :
      • Things that fail to satisfy basic biological needs
      • (Job Context factors/Hygiene factors):
      • Needs that must be met before the satisfiers can be addressed
  • 42.
    • Satisfiers
      • Achievement
      • Recognition
      • Work itself
      • Responsibility
      • Advancement
      • Growth
  • 43.
    • Dissatisfiers
      • Company policy and administration
      • Supervision
      • Relationship with supervisor
      • Work conditions
      • Salary
      • Relationship with peers
      • Personal life
      • Relationship with subordinates
      • Status
      • Security
  • 44. Maslow’s Needs Hierarchy Theory Self-actual-ization Physiological Safety Belongingness Esteem Seven categories capture most needs Five categories placed in a hierarchy Need to know Need for beauty
  • 45. Maslow – Hierarchy of Needs Developed in 1940 by Abraham Maslow
    • Based on 4 major assumptions:
      • Only unmet needs motivate
      • People’s needs are arranged in order of importance (basic – complex)
      • Lower-level needs must be met first
      • There are 5 classifications of need
  • 46. Hierarchy of Needs
    • Physiological:
      • Primary or basic needs,
      • i.e.,
      • air,
      • food,
      • shelter,
      • sex &
      • relief
      • or
      • avoidance of pain
  • 47. Hierarchy of Needs
    • Safety:
      • Once the physiological needs
      • are met,
      • the individual
      • is concerned with
      • safety and security
  • 48. Hierarchy of Needs
    • Belongingness:
      • After safety needs,
      • people look for
      • love,
      • friendship,
      • acceptance, and
      • Affection
      • Also Social Needs
  • 49. Hierarchy of Needs
    • Esteem:
      • After social needs,
      • the individual focuses on
      • ego,
      • status,
      • self-respect,
      • recognition for accomplishments and
      • feeling of self-confidence and prestige
  • 50. Hierarchy of Needs
    • Self-Actualization:
      • Highest level of need
      • is to develop
      • one’s full potential.
      • To do so,
      • one seeks growth,
      • achievement,
      • and advancement.
    • State of self-fulfillment
    • in which
    • people realize their highest potential
    • in their own unique way
  • 51. M OTIVATING O RGANIZATION M EMBERS Unsatisfied needs of organization members resulting in either appropriate or inappropriate behavior .
  • 52. Intrinsic / Extrinsic Rewards
      • Intrinsic rewards -
      • satisfactions a person receives in the process of performing a particular action.
        • Feeling of job well done
        • Sense of achievement
        • Pride
      • Extrinsic rewards –
      • given by another person.
        • Gifts
        • Promotion
        • Recognition
        • Praise
        • Salary Increase
        • Status
  • 53. The Nature of Motivation
    • Motivation
      • The psychological forces acting on an individual that determine:
        • Direction — possible behaviors the individual could engage in
        • Effort — how hard the individual will work
        • Persistence —whether the individual will keep trying or give up
      • Explains why people behave the way they do in organizations
  • 54. The Nature of Motivation (cont’d)
    • Intrinsic Motivation
      • Behavior that is performed for its own sake.
        • The source of the motivation that comes from actually engaging in the behavior.
        • The sense of accomplishment and achievement derived from doing the work itself
    • Extrinsic Motivation
      • Behavior that is performed to acquire material or social rewards or to avoid punishment.
        • The source of the motivation is the consequences of the behavior and not the behavior itself.
  • 55.
    • NEEDS :
        • Need for Affiliation –
      • An interest in establishing and maintaining relationships with other people
        • Need for Power –
        • Tendency to seek impact, control, or influence over others, and to be seen as a Powerful individual
  • 56.
    • EMOTIONS :
      • Feelings that generally have
      • both physiological and cognitive elements that influence behaviour
    The Role of Emotions
    • Emotions are important
    • We should train our emotions to help us achieve success and happiness
  • 57.
    • Preparing us for action
      • A link between events in our environment and our responses
    • Shaping our future behavior
      • Act as reinforcement
    • Helping us to interact more effectively with others
      • Act as a signal to observers, allowing them to better understand what we are experiencing and to predict our future behavior
    EMOTIONS :
  • 58. Achievement Motivation
  • 59. Need for Achievement
    • Motive to master tasks and resulting feelings of satisfaction.
    • High need for achievement :
    • Set challenging but realistic goals and derive satisfaction when the goal is met.
    • Low need for achievement :
    • Also like to succeed, but success tends to bring relief at having avoided failure.
  • 60. Influences on the Development of Achievement Motivation
    • Parents, especially during early childhood.
    • Subtle messages of culture’s view on the importance of achievement.
    • Beliefs about oneself resulting from social & cultural learning experiences.
  • 61. Achievement and Success in the Workplace
    • Job performance and job satisfaction increases when people are allowed to set and achieve clear goals.
    • Goals:
      • personally meaningful
      • specific and concrete
      • management supports of
      • workers’ own goal-setting

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