Alabama statewide report  5.3.12
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  • http://www.myonlinemaps.com/alabama.php

Alabama statewide report  5.3.12 Alabama statewide report 5.3.12 Presentation Transcript

  • Alabama Statewide Discussion Market Study Birmingham, AL April 30, 2012
  • METHODOLOGY• This study was a two part process that consisted of: – Part 1: Preliminary online market scan and NeighborWorks America Alabama Network meeting feedback in February 2012 – Part 2: Primary and Secondary Data through phone interviews, reports, publications and online data sources
  • ALABAMA AT A GLANCE
  • Alabama is a state mixed withurban and rural areas that can be defined in multiple ways
  • Population of Alabama has changed in thelast decade with an increase just under 8% overall. In particular there have heavy population increases in a portion of theNorth and Southwest area, while the other portion of the North and Southeast haveseen loss of population, as much as 20% in certain areas
  • POPULATION GROWTH AND RACE Source: Census Bureau; socialexplorer.com
  • POPULATION PER SQUARE MILEOverallAlabama’spopulation persquare miledoesn’t exceedthe 50-100range. Therespots in thenorthern andwestern portionof the statethat showincreasedpopulationdensity
  • Quick Demographics• A little more than 1/3 (~34%) of population is 50 years or older• A little more than ¼ (~27%) of households consist of a person living alone• About 15% of households consist of a female householder with no husband Census 2010
  • Alabama is struggling in key areas of Assets and Opportunities OVERALL GRADE: FNext several slides with detail the key areas of concern
  • FINANCIAL ASSETS & INCOME CORPORATION FOR ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT, (CFED) 2012
  • HEALTHCARE CORPORATION FOR ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT, (CFED) 2012
  • Alabama: Nonelderly Uninsured Distribution of the Nonelderly Uninsured by Age, states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL US US # % # % Children 102,900 14% 7,951,800 16% Adults 630,200 86% 41,160,200 84% Total 733,100 100% 49,111,900 100% Distribution of the Nonelderly Uninsured by Family Work Status, states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL US US # % # % At Least 1 Full Time Worker 403,900 55% 29,831,500 61% Part Time Workers 110,700 15% 7,688,700 16% Non Workers 218,500 30% 11,591,700 24% Total 733,100 100% 49,111,900 100%Distribution of the Nonelderly Uninsured by Federal Poverty Level (FPL), states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL AL US US US # % % of US Total # % % of US Total Under 100% 352,100 48% 2% 19,933,800 41% 100% 100-138% 87,700 12% 1% 6,396,300 13% 100% 139-250% 177,800 24% 1% 11,869,700 24% 100% 251-399% 63,200 9% 1% 6,235,200 13% 100% 400%+ NSD NSD NSD 4,676,900 10% 100% Total 733,100 100% 1% 49,111,900 100% 100%
  • Alabama healthcare system needs help with the majority ofindividuals in most need walkingaround with health insurance i.e. elderly and low income individuals
  • Alabama: Nonelderly Uninsured Distribution of the Nonelderly Uninsured by Age, states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL US US # % # % Children 102,900 14% 7,951,800 16% Adults 630,200 86% 41,160,200 84% Total 733,100 100% 49,111,900 100% Distribution of the Nonelderly Uninsured by Family Work Status, states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL US US # % # % At Least 1 Full Time Worker 403,900 55% 29,831,500 61% Part Time Workers 110,700 15% 7,688,700 16% Non Workers 218,500 30% 11,591,700 24% Total 733,100 100% 49,111,900 100%Distribution of the Nonelderly Uninsured by Federal Poverty Level (FPL), states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL AL US US US # % % of US Total # % % of US Total Under 100% 352,100 48% 2% 19,933,800 41% 100% 100-138% 87,700 12% 1% 6,396,300 13% 100% 139-250% 177,800 24% 1% 11,869,700 24% 100% 251-399% 63,200 9% 1% 6,235,200 13% 100% 400%+ NSD NSD NSD 4,676,900 10% 100% Total 733,100 100% 1% 49,111,900 100% 100%
  • Alabama: Nonelderly Uninsured Uninsured Rates for the Nonelderly by Age, states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL US US # % # % Children 102,900 9% 7,951,800 10% Adults 630,200 22% 41,160,200 22% Total 733,100 18% 49,111,900 18%Distribution of the Nonelderly Uninsured by Gender, states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL US US # % # % Female 337,200 46% 22,596,600 46% Male 395,800 54% 26,515,400 54% Total 733,100 100% 49,111,900 100%Distribution of the Nonelderly Uninsured by Race/Ethnicity, states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL US AL AL US US % of US % of US # % # % Total Total White 448,100 61% 2% 22,796,200 46% 100% Black 197,400 27% 3% 7,514,400 15% 100% Hispanic 64,200 9% <1% 15,094,200 31% 100% Other NSD NSD NSD 3,707,100 8% 100% Total 733,100 100% 1% 49,111,900 100% 100%
  • Alabama: Nonelderly UninsuredUninsured Rates for the Nonelderly by Federal Poverty Level (FPL), states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL US US # % # % Under 100% 352,100 36% 19,933,800 34% Under 139% 439,800 33% 26,330,200 34% 139-250% 177,800 21% 11,869,700 24% 251-399% 63,200 9% 6,235,200 12% 400%+ NSD NSD 4,676,900 5% Total 733,100 18% 49,111,900 18%Uninsured Rates for the Nonelderly by Family Work Status, states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL US US # % # % At Least 1 Full Time Worker 403,900 14% 29,831,500 15% Part Time Workers 110,700 32% 7,688,700 31% Non Workers 218,500 30% 11,591,700 29% Total 733,100 18% 49,111,900 18%Uninsured Rates for the Nonelderly by Gender, states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL US US # % # % Female 337,200 16% 22,596,600 17% Male 395,800 20% 26,515,400 20% Total 733,100 18% 49,111,900 18%Uninsured Rates for the Nonelderly by Race/Ethnicity, states (2009-2010), U.S. (2010)View 50-State Comparison AL AL US US # % # % White 448,100 17% 22,796,200 14% Black 197,400 18% 7,514,400 22% Hispanic 64,200 39% 15,094,200 32% Other NSD NSD 3,707,100 19% Total 733,100 18% 49,111,900 18%
  • What is Alabama’s Health Ranking? Rating?
  • The figure below depicts the structure of the Rankings model; thosehaving high ranks (e.g., 1 or 2) are estimated to be the “healthiest.”
  • The Next Couple of Slides Will Illustrate How Alabama Counties Rank in bothHealth Outcomes and Health Factors
  • Southeast Northeast Alabama has a Alabama has a concentration small cluster of poorly of poorly ranked ranked counties in counties interms of health terms of outcomes health outcomes
  • Health Ratings/Rankings have todo with health outcomes, health indicators and even access to healthy foods
  • Southeast Alabama has a Southwest concentration Alabama has a of poorly small cluster ranked of poorly counties in rankedterms of health counties in factors terms of health factors
  • ALABAMA30+ Food Deserts = Healthy Food Access Problem
  • STATE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
  • Alabama’s Business and Job outlook is not measuring up tonational average in terms of low wage jobs, business value by race and by gender
  • BUSINESSES AND JOBS CORPORATION FOR ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT, (CFED) 2012
  • Alabama It is evident there are clusters of jobs in the northern end of the state while the southern, eastern and even some areas of the western portion jobs are scarce Census LEHD
  • Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • Upcoming map shows Alabama Workforce Investment areas (WIAs) The slides that follow the map detail the exact labor profile for the various WIAs
  • WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT AREAS (WIA) OF ALABAMA Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • Source: US. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies
  • 2010 Inflow/Outflow Analysis Alabama
  • Alabama is the nation’s third poorest state.Nearly 19 percent of Alabamians – and morethan 27 percent of children – live below thepoverty line. Source: Alabama Poverty Project
  • QUALITY OF LIFE STATS Source: Census Bureau, 2010
  • Quality of Life Indicators Signal a VulnerablePopulation Struggling to Meet Basic Needs
  • FACTS ABOUT ALABAMA•More than 1 in 6 Alabamians live in poverty•17.5 percent of Alabamians live below the federal poverty line, which is $21,954 inhousehold earnings for a family of four. US Census Bureau, Small Area Income & PovertyEstimates•1 in 4 children in Alabama live in poverty.•24.6 percent of children live in households below the federal poverty line. US CensusBBureau, Small Area Income & Poverty Estimates•2nd largest income gap•The gap between Alabama’s richest and poorest is the second largest in thenation. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities•41.4 percent high school dropout rate•Alabama ranks 42nd in the nation in per capita income. Nearly 60 percent of that wagegap can be attributed to our high school drop out rate, which was 41.4 percent in2007. Southern Education Foundation•2nd most obese, 4th most diabetic state•Alabama is the second most obese state in the country and has the fourth highest rate ofdiabetes among adults. Trust for America’s Health; CDC•2nd hungriest state in the nation•25 percent of Alabamians experienced food hardship in 2010. Food Research and ActionCenter Source: Alabama Poverty Project
  • EDUCATION CORPORATION FOR ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT, (CFED) 2012
  • STATE OF HOUSING
  • HOUSING & HOMEOWNERSHIP CORPORATION FOR ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT, (CFED) 2012
  • Source: American Community Survey, 2010
  • Source: American Community Survey, 2010
  • Quality Affordable Housing is Scarce
  • Quality Affordable Housing is Scarce because
  • ~50% of Alabama housing stock was built between 1970-1999—3 decades..very few new homes built inthe last 10 years; This phenomenon speaks to the needfor rehabilitation services and dilapidation that plagues the area
  • Source: American CommunitySurvey, 2010
  • Quality Affordable Housing is Scarce
  • With a large portion of the Alabamanians being elderly and/or extremely low income, housing burdens and difficultylocating “ affordable” housing is evitable, regardless of tenure
  • Source: Out of Reach 2012
  • HOUSING BURDEN BY TENURE Homeowners Housing units with a mortgage 769,331 PERCENT Less than 20.0 percent 313,529 40.80% 20.0 to 24.9 percent 117,330 15.30% 25.0 to 29.9 percent 86,584 11.30% 30.0 to 34.9 percent 58,183 7.60% 35.0 percent or more 193,705 25.20% Renters Occupied units paying rent 468,359 PERCENT Less than 15.0 percent 55,155 11.80% 15.0 to 19.9 percent 55,439 11.80% 20.0 to 24.9 percent 54,070 11.50% 25.0 to 29.9 percent 50,548 10.80% 30.0 to 34.9 percent 42,869 9.20% 35.0 percent or more 210,278 44.90%Source: American Community Survey, 2010
  • RURAL HOUSING
  • Why is Affordable Housing in Rural Areas Difficult?• Not as scalable as urban or suburban development• Operating and construction costs are higher• Given the first two bullets hard to keep rents and leases low and affordable
  • HOUSING PERMIT ISSUANCE IS STILL TAKING PLACE PRIMARILYFOR SINGLE FAMILY AND MULTI- FAMILY UNITS Are units being built in the areas in most need and for those in the greatest need?
  • Quality Affordable Housing is Scarce
  • Occupied/Occupiable HousingStock is being lost to Foreclosure
  • Homeowners Are Underwater•According to a recent report from CoreLogic Alabama residents withmortgages are still suffering. Report provides the following statistics:•About 12 percent of Alabama properties with a mortgage were innegative equity – or underwater – in the fourth quarter.•The report said the state had 43,431 negative equity mortgages in thequarter.•Another 20,768 or 5.7 percent were near negative equity.•At the national level, 22.8 percent of mortgages were underwater for thequarter. Source: Birmingham Business Journal, March 2012
  • There are about 36,000* taxdelinquent properties for sale in Alabama Source: Alabama Department of Revenue, April 26, 2012
  • According to CoreLogic the number ofAlabama homes in foreclosure is low andgetting lower, but is still a problem Birmingham Business Journal-March 29, 2012
  • AREAS WHERE FORECLOSURES ARE FOR SALE Source: RealtyStore
  • However, foreclosure Heat Maps show that from January to March 2012 the number of foreclosures increased from 1,489 to 1,647
  • January 2012 Foreclosure Rate Heat Map RealtyTrac, 2012
  • March 2012 Foreclosure Rate Heat Map RealtyTrac, 2012
  • Next few slides illustrate relationships between foreclosure filings and differentvariables as well as fluctuation inauctions and Real Estate Owned (REOs)
  • Foreclosures and Home Price AppreciationKey spikes in totalforeclosure filingsoccurred a littlebefore May 2011,July 2011 andSeptember 2011;Incrementalgrowth seen fromJanuary 2012 toMarch 2012 RealtyTrac, 2012
  • Foreclosures and Interest RatesDespite thefluctuations inforeclosureactivity we see asteady decreasein interest ratesfrom April 2011to March 2012 RealtyTrac, 2012
  • Auction and Real Estate Owned PropertiesSpikes in Auction properties seen in October 2011and March 2012; Greatest number REOs seenOctober 2011 and between January-February 2012 RealtyTrac, 2012
  • Occupied/Occupiable HousingStock is being lost to Natural Disaster
  • APRIL 2011 TORNADOES CHANGED PEOPLE’S LIVES FOREVER• THERE WERE A TOTAL OF 139 DEATHS DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE TORNADOES IN CENTRAL ALABAMA ON APRIL 27TH.• OF THOSE 139 DEATHS ON APRIL 27TH, 86 PEOPLE WERE KILLED IN PERMANENT STRUCTURES, SUCH AS A HOME, FACTORY OR CHURCH. 46 WERE KILLED WHILE IN MANUFACTURED HOMES. 2 FATALITIES OCCURRED WHILE PEOPLE WERE STILL IN THEIR VEHICLES AND 2 OTHERS WHILE OUTDOORS.• APRIL 27TH SAW 5 OF THE 10 LONGEST TORNADO TRACKS IN RECORDED HISTORY.• THERE WERE 247 DEATHS IN THE STATE OF ALABAMA ON APRIL 27TH. THIS RANKS AS THE SECOND DEADLIEST DAY IN ALABAMA BEHIND THE MARCH 1932 OUTBREAK WHEN 270 DIED. Source: National Weather Service of Birmingham, August 2011
  • More Tornado Statistics• Impacted 64% of Alabama counties; Tuscaloosa County and City of Tuscaloosa were severely impacted• Older housing stock primarily built 1950 to 1970-single family homes, small to medium apartments and off campus student housing• Approximately 5,144 housing units, 12.6% of the City’s total housing inventory of 40,872, were impacted by disaster.• A preliminary estimate to repair damaged (3,904 units) and replace destroyed homes (1,240 units) is $224,319,552 or $43,608 per unit. Source: Alabama Center for Real Estate- University of Alabama; August 2011
  • MASSIVE DEVASTATION: ENTIRE COMMUNITIES WERE WIPED OUT
  • NEIGHBORWORKS ALABAMA NETWORK PROFILE
  • TERRITORY
  • Health Factors and Indicators forAlabama show that there specific counties which rank poorly in these areas
  • The Quality of Life for Alabama residents by county shows thatthere are key pockets of povertyand low income areas; Children, one of the most defenseless portions of the population are suffering
  • STATE OF HOUSING
  • Housing Characteristics• Extremely old housing stock that needs extensive repairs or in some cases needs to be demolished altogether• Homeownership is still high, but in light of economic downturn and disasters trending towards increased renters• Households are severely burdened regardless of tenure• Occupancy
  • BEYOND HOMES IN DESPERATE NEED OF REHABILITATION SOME HOMES PARTICULARLY IN RURAL AREAS ARE SUBSTANDARD I.E. NO PLUMBING AND JUST DEPLORABLE LIVING CONDITIONS
  • County outlook on foreclosures shows that between January-March 2012 there was change inthe propensity of foreclosure as well as the counties most impacted
  • January 2012 Foreclosure Rate Heat Map RealtyTrac, 2012
  • March 2012 Foreclosure Rate Heat Map RealtyTrac, 2012
  • IMPACT OF TORNADOES
  • TORNADOES HAD A RIPPLE EFFECT. APRIL 2011 WAS DEVASTATING BUT THE IMPACT WAS FURTHERCOMPOUNDED BY MARCH 2012 FOR SOME PEOPLE WITHHOMES RECENTLY REBUILT BEING DESTROYED AGAIN ORTHOSE NOT PREVIOUSLY IMPACTED BECOMING A VICTIM
  • TORNADOES (April 2011-March 2012) & NWOS • CPS-Town Sumter county, Geiger got hit on April 15th-40% of homes were destroyed, large portion were trailers. Unfortunately they were not at that point declared a disaster area so residents in that were unable to get money from FEMA • CAPNA Service Area-took out housing stock, displaced residences requiring some to migrate 40-50 miles to find housing; pre-storm affordable housing supply at 300 and post storm added additional 300 making the total shortage 600 • NHS-Obliterated Centerpoint Elementary School along with 400 homes
  • NeighborWorks Alabama Network
  • Strengths•Housing counseling•Foreclosure mitigation•Home maintenance•Developer side-largest in the state.assessing areas of needs and making •Economic Losshomeownership or creating a development • Population Driftthat provides a pathway to affordablehousing. • Unemployment Higher than Usual • Median Income is dropping•Services Would Like to Offer• Broader scale homeownership initiative•Single family housing development•Rural housing initiative•Capital lending-making mortgages
  • Homeownership & Home Purchases• Home Ownership support – 40% occupants are house burden; 35% home owners and 5% renters – Average Mortgage is $255; median mortgage is $200 and high is $2,700 – Morgan county accounts for most of the mortgage foreclosures• Home Purchases – Climbing for Morgan and Cullman County; slight decline in Lawrence County – Affordable housing deficit for Morgan and Cullman County; median house cost ~$105,000
  • Source: CAPNA October 2011Market Analysis
  • •Pickens County-Weatherizatioinservices• Greene County-2008 33, singlefamily detached homes and healthfacility plus weatherization &foreclosure prevention• Selma-Dallas County-contractedsomeone to manage housingdevelopment
  • Strengths•Good Reputation in the Community•Political Connections•Community Building and OrganizingServices Would Like to Offer Prisoner Re-Entry CDFI StatusResources and Education for MinorityContractorsUnique about the service area, richestcounties though, then have 2nd poorestcounty which is Greene county.
  • *Though one county is theservice area, technically thecoverage area is the entirestate
  • Strengths •Only homeownership center in the state • Counseling and education •Foreclosure prevention to a greater number of clients than any other places in the state. • Incredibly skilled staff •Licensed contractor and attorney. •Been around 40 years. •Staple in our community Economic Loss in Service AreaServices Would Like to Offer Financial Institution Mass LayoffsHousing Development Debt Crisis and Sewer Issues &Lending Bankruptcy Jefferson County job loss ~1,000+
  • WHERE ARE THE GAPS?
  • Organizations Aspire to Offer More Services Such as Those Below, But Need More Capacity• Housing Development• Lending-CDFI• Small Business development• Homeownership Counseling• Resources for Rural Affordable Housing; Rural Housing Initiative• Capital Lending
  • What is the Ideal Alabama In Terms of Affordable Housing?• “we have a cohesive program policies around housing, trust fund that will identify affordable housing in Alabama. identifying the gaps especially with the elderly. they have a safe place to live. transcends across the state and we have eradicated the substandard housing.”• “would have an affordable housing clearinghouse that included wrap around services.”• “any family that wanted to own their home could approach a community based organization that could help them from beginning to end. they will realize the dream of homeownership. wouldn’t have to go through layer after layer.”• “development of smaller affordable housing properties in rural areas that are not serviced by anyone right now.”
  • OBSTACLES TO THE IDEAL ALABAMA• LACK OF RESOURCES• LACK OF POLITICAL WILL• LACK OF HOUSING POLICY; HOUSING TRUST FUND BILL GETTING PASSED• OBTAINING CLEAR TITLES• LAND ACQUISITION-AIR PROPERTY• LACK OF A COHESIVE PLAN• NEED FOR MORE PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS WITH “ON THE GROUND” ORGANIZATIONS
  • CONCLUSIONS &RECOMMENDATIONS
  • CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS• MANY AREAS WITHIN THE ALABAMA NETWORK WOULD CONSTITUTE “UNDERSERVED”• ALABAMA IS STRUGGLING SOCIO ECONOMICALLY AND ALL OF THE CDCS SEE OPPORTUNITIES FOR HOW THEY CAN INCREASE THEIR CAPACITY AND THUS EXPAND THEIR SERVICES TO THEIR CLIENTS. GIVEN THE SHRINKING RESOURCE AVAILABILITY AND THE TREMENDOUS ALABAMA CDC STRENGTH, ESTABLISHING A STRATEGIC COLLABORATIVE THAT INCLUDES THE ALABAMA NEIGHBORWORKS NETWORK AS WELL AS THE OTHER CDCS WOULD HELP EXPEDITE AND STRENGTHEN ANY INITIATIVE AROUND IMPROVING THE AFFORDABLE HOUSING SCARCITY• RURAL AFFORDABLE HOUSING IS AN AREA THAT REQUIRES A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF ATTENTION. LEVERAGE NEIGHBORWORKS NETWORK INTELLIGENCE FROM OTHER STATES COULD BE ONE OF MANY WAYS TO ADDRESS THIS PROBLEM• ORGANIZING A STATE MEETING WITH PUBLIC OFFICIALS AND THE KEY INTERMEDIARIES AND FOUNDATIONS IN ALABAMA WOULD HELP DRIVE A STATE AGENDA AROUND AFFORDABLE HOUSING. SUCH AN EFFORT MAY ALSO AID IN THE PASSING OF SOME HOUSING POLICY THAT WOULD IMPROVE CURRENT UNCONSCIONABLE LIVING CONDITIONS MANY ALABAMANIANS ARE EXPERIENCING
  • CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS• FAHE’S BACK OFFICE SERVICES WOULD BE A GREAT ASSET TO ALABAMA ESPECIALLY GIVEN SOME OF THE CHALLENGES AROUND CLEAR TITLE AND LENDING THAT WERE EXPRESSED BY PRACTITIONERS• ESTABLISHING AN ALABAMA COLLABORATIVE WOULD BENEFIT THE STATE AND CURRENT CHALLENGES OF THE AFFORDABLE HOUSING. WHILE ALL PARTIES SEEM OPEN TO AN COLLABORATIVE IT IS CLEAR THAT IN ORDER FOR SUCH AN COLLABORATIVE TO BE EFFECTIVE CLEAR TERMS NEED TO BE LAID OUT. THE COLLABORATIVE MUST INCLUDE MOUS AND ENSURE THAT THE ARRANGEMENT IS NOT ONLY BENEFICIAL TO THE STATE BUT THAT COLLABORATIVE PARTIES ARE ABLE TO LEVERAGE THEIR ORGANIZIATIONAL STRENGTHS WITHOUT FEELING LIKE THEY ARE “GIVING AWAY THEIR CLIENTS TO A COMPETITOR”• BEYOND THE AGREEMENT THE COLLABORATIVE SHOULD HAVE A DOCUMENT DETAILING HOW THE COLLECTIVE GROUP WILL WORK TOGETHER. A GOOD INFORMATION SHARING MODEL TO CONSIDER IS FAHE’S CAUCAUSES WHICH AFFORDS MEMBERS TO ROUTINELY SHARE INFORMATION AND LEVERAGE EACH OTHER’S CAPACITY TO MAKE AN
  • CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS• OTHER OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVING THE AFFORDABILITY SCARCITY WOULD BE – COMMUNITY LAND TRUSTS-SOME INDIVIDUALS ARE MEMBERS OF OR IN CONVERSATION WITH THE NATIONAL COMMUNITY LAND TRUST COLLABORATIVE – LAND BANKING
  • APPENDIX
  • Additional Resources• Food Desert Locator. http://www.ers.usda.gov/data/• National Community Land Trust. http://www.cltnetwork.org/index.php?fuseaction=M• Land Bank Authorities. http://www.lisc.org/content/publications/detail/793• Real Estate and Housing Data. http://www.acre.cba.u