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Martin Rieser: The future of mobile media

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This talk looks at the potential for business services in new developments in mobile and pervasive media, particularly in the cultural industries and communication. It looks at the ways in which our …

This talk looks at the potential for business services in new developments in mobile and pervasive media, particularly in the cultural industries and communication. It looks at the ways in which our working lives and behaviours will be transformed and raises questions about the social use and adaptation of these technologies.

Professor Martin Rieser has always been fascinated by the possibility of creating fragmentary narrative structures and interactive stories using new technology. This has led him into his current explorations using mobile and locative technologies and large-scale interactive video experiences. Professor Rieser has worked in the field of interactive arts for many years. He is Joint research Professor between the Institute of Creative Technologies and the Faculty of Art and Design at De Montfort University. His art practice in internet art and interactive narrative installations has been seen around the world including Cannes; Holland, Paris; Vienna, Thessaloniki, London, Germany, Milan and Melbourne, Australia. He has published numerous essays and books on digital art including New Screen Media: Cinema/Art/Narrative (BFI/ZKM, 2002), and has recently edited The Mobile Audience, a book on locative technology and art due out this year from Rodopi.
www.martinrieser.com
www.ioct.dmu.ac.uk

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  • 1. + 2020 VISION The Future of Mobile Technologies Professor Martin Rieser De Montfort University
  • 2. + Emergent Technologies 2 Locative Media and Pervasive Media The convergence of mobile technologies and ubiquitous computing have created a world where information-rich environments may be mapped directly onto urban spaces. My interest in dispersed forms of interaction focuses on the way they raises a whole new series of intriguing questions on the nature of narrative and communication, particularly in relation to an audience’s modes of participation and reception.
  • 3. + Emergent Technologies 3 Locative media is closely related to augmented reality (reality overlaid with virtual reality) and to pervasive or ubiquitous computing, Locative media concentrates on social interaction with a specific place through mobile technology. Many locative media art projects have a background in social, critical or personal memory. I will describe attempts to use location-specific media in the context of spatialised interaction.
  • 4. + Emergent Technologies 4 Locative Media and Pervasive Media Locative technology blurs the borders between physical and virtual space, leading to the redefinition of the concept of the virtual from that of simulation to that of augmentation.
  • 5. + Emergent Technologies 5 Locative Media and Pervasive Media Locative technology blurs the borders between physical and virtual space, leading to the redefinition of the concept of the virtual from that of simulation to that of augmentation.
  • 6. + Emergent Behaviours 6  How is pervasive technology changing public behaviour?  Clearly the boundary between the private and the public is altering and the merging of the two is accelerating through augmented mobile reality etc.  Public conversations sometimes appear performative. Often phones in public are an intrusive technology and the tracking of individuals by social media is often a questionable practice.  How therefore do services re-frame ideas of privacy in public space to take account of these new pervasive technologies?
  • 7. + Natural Interfaces: Natal 7  How do you believe that both individuals and businesses in Leicester will be using technology in ten years time? What do you predict?  Business and the individual will both find mobile and pervasive technologies integrated in every aspect of their lives-all services will be mobile cloud computing and wide area networks will ensure reception is good across the city space
  • 8. + Impacts 8  Our attitude to the city has changed- now which tends to re- imagine it as an unwritten slate. Our trajectory through it and our sense of place seems to be altering from that of perceived fixed nodes to a more fluid experience- constantly diverted by location-based hyperlinked information.  We also have a changed relation to synchronicity. Mapping technologies and push media accelerate this changing sense of place as no longer a fixed terrain, but an amorphous space of potential.
  • 9. + Place and Space and Art 9  Can Pervasive Media successfully create place out of space, or even from Marc Auge’s “non-places”- those transferable spaces of alienation? How can these non-places be transformed by locative media?  Artists tend to experiment in memory-rich spaces, rather than those urban deserts. Accessibility is also a major issue-not everyone has the latest iphone.  In experiencing this new public space- how can the past and the present, public and private- be brought together by the new technologies in ways that enrich our lives?
  • 10. + Place and Space and Art 10  We live in a world of lost histories-how can we reframe these successfully for the public?  If pervasive media allows the enrichment of place, how can we also enable the public to do this for themselves?  Now that such located rich media is emerging, how can this be filtered to ensure quality of experience and safety for the user?
  • 11. + Future sensing: Songlines 11
  • 12. + Future sensing:Songlines 12 Using image and object sensing via mobiles for Songlines
  • 13. + Riverains: London 13 Empedia for Riverains
  • 14. + Riverains: London 14 Empedia for Riverains: QR Codes
  • 15. + Riverains: London 15 Empedia for Riverains: QR Codes
  • 16. + Riverains: London 16 Empedia for Riverains: QR Codes
  • 17. + Riverains: London 17 Empedia for Riverains: QR Codes
  • 18. Emotion sensing: Christian NoldFilm+ Structure 18
  • 19. Emotion sensing: Third WomanFilm+ Structure 19 The scenarios of the drama are constructed in three differently versioned forms to reflect subtle changes in emotional emphasis-designed to be driven by emotion sensing technology
  • 20. + Hybrid Place and Space 20
  • 21. + Hybridity 21  Our ability to conceptualise the world and filter our sensory inputs makes “reality” a construction of the brain-there seems to be no such thing as direct perception. It seems likely that the brain does not differentiate between the real and virtual.  For example, those blind from birth, who recover their sight, have not developed the neurones for facial recognition-our sense of reality therefore seems to depend on our internal wiring
  • 22. + Hybridity 22  In Hybrid spaces, material and immaterial space are merging. There is no longer a clear line between them. We need to examine and understand this in relation to theories of the mind.  A key question derived from our various project user- evaluations is do we actually process a mixed reality experience? It is very difficult to examine cognitive mapping in a mobile experience. Techniques such as mobile eye tracking can help (RetailLab)
  • 23. + Hybridity 23  In Hybrid spaces, material and immaterial space are merging. There is no longer a clear line between them. We need to examine and understand this in relation to theories of the mind.  A key question derived from our various project user- evaluations is do we actually process a mixed reality experience? It is very difficult to examine cognitive mapping in a mobile experience. Techniques such as mobile eye tracking can help (RetailLab)
  • 24. + Projection 24  What do you think Leicester could be like in ten years time in the best case, in terms of mobile technology?  Leicester like all major cities will be more privatised and individualistic, with some citizen-led attempts to revivify public and collective values against the smaller state impositions of the previous ten years.  Information and personalised mobile services will be even more important to the citizen in their survival strategies
  • 25. + Future Technologies 25  Mobile services are moving towards gesture recognition and natural language interfaces, as well as towards emotion sensing. How can we envisage the increasing invisibility of the device as this natural interaction develops into a form of “unforced” hybridity-which may include mobile projection?  This may be come a world where information streams start responding to our changing emotions. Such interwoven hybridity will in turn give rise to further new behaviours.  We already experience this with hands-free gestural performances on mobiles. What will happen when we have mobile non-verbal two way communication through enhanced or projected video conferencing!
  • 26. + Integrated homes 26  As an artist, what do you believe the future for content is? For example: we have all seen the increase of channels on Sky television, but there is far too much to choose from...  Content will be pre-filtered by personal preferences to avoid overwhelming the user-but mobile TV etc will be ubiquitous and related to space and place.
  • 27. + Intelligent adaptive and 27 transformative architecture-  Much research in Architecture at present focuses on technological developments, but not much thought seems to be given to underlying concepts for behaviour changing spaces.  Can the use of such technology in our homes and work- spaces actually change our behaviour?  Perhaps we need hard, clear and accessible information streams before buildings can stimulate beneficial behaviour change
  • 28. + Intelligent adaptive and 28 transformative architecture-  Smart homes can be helpful, but are largely passive in their effects.  To effect behaviour change we need to consider a more complex relationship between design and human behaviour. We are moving to emotional sensing and predictive behaviour by buildings-that is adaptive architecture sensing and reacting, but allowing the user to determine the core and auxiliary services, perhaps by learning through a neural net!
  • 29. + Imagining Futures 29  What do you think the city of Leicester be like in 2020 in your opinon? In general, not just in your specific area.  Leicester will have recovered from the depression years of 2010-2018 and will be regenerating through small e- business start ups and service providers.  Micro-manufacturing start ups linked to new technologies will also be part of this new economy.  Small scale individual entrepreneurship will be the order of the day, offering personalised services through new mobile networking.
  • 30. + Futures: Opportunities 30  You say that businesses are not aware of the opportunities that mobile technology offers - what kind of opportunities are these can you give any examples? Why will these opportunities benefit them and in what way?  Micro-business and niche provision through personalised mobile services is a growth area, particularly when linked to social media and lifestyle choices
  • 31. + Futures: Best case 31  What do you think Leicester could be like in ten years time in the best case, in terms of mobile technology?  Leicester like all major cities will be more privatised and individualistic, with some citizen-led attempts to revivify public and collective values against the smaller state impositions of the previous ten years.  Information and personalised mobile services will be even more important to the citizen in their survival strategies
  • 32. + Futures: Users 32  In ten years time, in your opinion, do you think that people will still be using mobile phones - and will they look different to how they are now? Do you think that the technology can develop much further in ten years time? And to what extreme?!  The mobile phone will be more integrated into our bodies with sensory switches linked to our emotions and movements and gestures and the infrastructure around us will read from our phones and respond with services and environmental adjustments.  Mobile sharing will be automated and information will migrate from phone to phone automatically according to pre- selected filters
  • 33. + Futures: Nano technologies 33
  • 34. + Futures: Content 34  As an artist, what do you believe the future for content is? For example: we have all seen the increase of channels on Sky television, but there is far too much to choose from...  Content will be pre-filtered by personal preferences to avoid overwhelming the user-but mobile TV etc will be ubiquitous and related to space and place.
  • 35. + Futures: Integration 35  How do you believe that both individuals and businesses in Leicester will be using technology in ten years time? What do you predict?  Business and the individual will both find mobile and pervasive technologies integrated in every aspect of their lives. All services will be mobile cloud computing and wide area networks and 4G will ensure reception is good across the city space
  • 36. + Integration and Cloud 36 Computing
  • 37. + Futures: Economics 37  How good could this technology be to both businesses and individuals?  Britain is well placed to develop applications in this area which are ingenious and needed-and of global reach.  Do you think that we have the right entrepreneurs and forward- thinkers in society and local government to enable this city to be all that it can be 10 years from now?  Most of the developments I predict are tied up with the right economic model: more entrepreneurial finance is needed and for this the banks and government would have to collaborate to set up new and easier risk-friendly finance structures.
  • 38. + Futures: Change 38  Do you think Leicester is equipped to cope with the changes in technology?  Not on its current record as a city-it needs to move away from an unsustainable private car-based economy to bring life back into the centre and to allow its culture and lifestyle to retain creative talents and innovators in the city.  This means developing cultural capital, green spaces, and city centre nightlife for all its citizens.
  • 39. + Futures: Business 39  And finally in your own opinion how do you think the Leicester business world will look in 10 years time? A lot can change in this time cant it?!  Leicester has a wealth of energy and market connections with Asia and the Indian sub-continent. It is multicultural in the truest sense and is therefore potentially a model for the future shape of British cities. It has three good and innovative universities- including Loughborough-that is 30,000 Creative Industry-linked students .  What we need to see in the city is more connection between these engines of prosperity and easier ways to fund and develop innovation using the new pervasive technologies- such as mobile phones.
  • 40. + Futures: Speculation 40  And finally in your own opinion how do you think the Leicester business world will look in 10 years time? A lot can change in this time cant it?!  Leicester has a wealth of energy and market connections with the Indian sub-continent. It is multicultural in the truest sense and is therefore potentially a model for the future shape of British cities. It has two good and innovative universities .  What we need to see in the city is more connection between these engines of prosperity and easier ways to fund and develop innovation using the new pervasive technologies- such as mobile phones.