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Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611
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Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Mega-Region: New Strategies for the Sustainable City in the 21st Century (Paul Armstrong) - ULI fall meeting - 102611

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  • 1. New strategies for the sustainable city of the 21st century
  • 2. Decline of Manufacturing in U.S. Manufacturing employment: 1950 = 34%; 2004 = 13% Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor & Statics
  • 3. Great Recession of 2008 Exacerbated manufacturing decline Closing of facilities Lay-offs of workersManufacturing base relocating Inexpensive labor Reduced costs
  • 4. Transformation of U.S. from manufacturing to innovation economy Affects urban form of cities  Population decline  Income reduction  Tax receipt reduction  Vacant buildings
  • 5. Reinventing U.S. Post-Industrial Cities Centers for creativity and innovation Reclaim post-industrial districts Create mixed-uses Invest in infrastructure  Transportation  Communications technology Develop business incubators Attract Creative Class Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statics, 2008 Adopt smart Growth practices Embrace sustainable design to promote compact, livable cities
  • 6. Post-Industrial Coined by Daniel Bell in 1973 Economic transition from manufacturing- to service-basedSmart Growth Don Carter, Director of Remaking Cities Institute Shrinking cities have best attributes  Walkable neighborhoods  Affordable housing  Historic downtowns and main streets  Strong universities, hospitals, cultural amenities  Unused infrastructure capacity  Public transit  Abundant potable water
  • 7. Urban Metabolism Richard Florida Cities grow in GDP Innovation Patent activityMaximizing Urban Metabolism Urban shrinkage Geographical consolidation Revitalization of post-industrial districts
  • 8. Transportation & Communications Networks Consolidate Regions Physically VirtuallyU.S. Highway System of 1950s-1960s Accommodate increase of personal vehicles Destroyed urban fabric Transported jobs & people away from city
  • 9. Transit Corridors John Norquist, CEO Congress for New New Urbanism Not feasible to exclude traffic from cities Accommodate all modes of transportation  Pedestrians  Bicycles  Mass Transit  Vehicles
  • 10. Eurallile, Lille, France, 1989-Present 800,000 m2 (8.6 million ft2) new urban activities 120 hectares (297 acres) Shopping, offices, parking, new TGV station, hotels, housing, concert/congress hall
  • 11. Euralille New TGV Line Links Lille, Brussels, Paris Rem Koolhaas, Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) Conventional urban “programs” have become abstract No longer connected to place or city “Float and gravitate opportunistically” Offer highest number & quality of connections
  • 12. Euralille – Post-Industrial Paradigm Model for U.S. cities Values & experiences of modern architecture & living  Universally shared  Irreversible Transportation & global communication  Make every place, everyone accessible physically, virtually
  • 13. U.S. High Speed Rail (HSR) Existing & new rail corridors Tri-State HSR St. Louis/Chicago/Milwaukee-Madison/Minneapolis-St. Paul
  • 14. Annual Benefits to Chicago Metro Area of HSR $13.8 billion increase in business sales Add 104,000 new jobs Additional $5.5 billion in wages
  • 15. Economic Benefits of HSR to U.S. Midwest Revitalize manufacturing New train production Create new economic growth sectors  Agri-business  Sustainable technology  Bio-medicine  Manufacturing  Education
  • 16. Increasing “Creative Capital” Mixed-use transportation nodes & epicenters Flexible programs Sustainable planning & infrastructure development Attract people, services, new technologies, clean industries
  • 17. Mid-size U.S. Cities in Midwest Successful transformations of industrial districts Compact Existing infrastructures City services Buildings Skilled & educated people
  • 18. Milwaukee, WI Located on SW shore of Lake Michigan 90 miles (145km) north of Chicago City of Milwaukee population = 594,833 Greater Milwaukee population = 1,751,316
  • 19. Milwaukee’s Third Ward Craftsmen, artists, artisans can fit with small-scale manufacturing (Norquist) Galleries, condos, ships, restaurants, wholesale produce, machine shops 2,000 new residents since 1983
  • 20. Milwaukee’s Third Ward Milwaukee Intermodal Station (2007) Amtrak, Greyhound bus lines, Jefferson Lines intercity bus Midwest High- Speed Rail (MWHSR)  $800 million federal funds allocated in 2010  Upper Midwest mega-region  Chicago, Milwaukee-Madison, WI, Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN
  • 21. Minneapolis, MN Located on both banks of Mississippi River Minneapolis/St. Paul 16th largest U.S. metropolitan area 3.5 million residents Economy commerce, finance, publishing, milling, food processing, high technology Headquarters of six Fortune 500 corporations
  • 22. Minneapolis Warehouse District Originally shipping hub Epicenter of art scene during 1980s Recent developments: loft condominiums/apartments, adaptive re-use of Gold Medal Flour Mill for museum, Guthrie Theater, Target Field
  • 23. High-Speed Rail & Smart Growth Revitalize post-industrial cities Bring new sources of economic development Transportation nodes & communications technologies  Allow regions to prosper  Attract capital investment  Foster new industries & technologies  Create wealth & jobs  Reinvigorate metabolic flow of regions

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