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New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
New Economy, New Value Equations
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New Economy, New Value Equations

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Harriet tregoning, New Economy, New Value Equations

Harriet tregoning, New Economy, New Value Equations

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  • 1. Washington D.C. and Cities of the Future Past What’s Next?New Economy, New Value EquationsULI Spring Meeting—CharlotteMay 8, 2012Harriet Tregoning, Director
  • 2. Washington, DC is growing 2010 Census pop: 601,723 July 2011: 617,996And our demographics…look like the rest of the US… in 2050• Growing diversity & smaller households• Influx of young professionals attracted to  vibrant neighborhoods• Development of housing & amenities that  suit young professionals; mixed use
  • 3. Attributes of a Globally Competitive City/Region 4
  • 4. Attributes of a Globally Competitive City/Region 5
  • 5. The Luxury of Choice
  • 6. A Regional System
  • 7. Branded bus service ‐ DC Circulator Top 3 Trip Types: • Commute  • Recreational • Shop/Dine
  • 8. Expanding bicycling facilities –the last mile • Bicycling extends access to Metro and  other transit hubs • DC has 51 miles of bike lanes, 64 miles of  signed bike routes and 56 miles of trails  Capital Bikeshare • Over 1,200 bicycles at 140 stations across  the District & Arlington, VA  • 16,000 annual members and more than  105,000 24‐hour members since its launch  in 2010 • 1.5 million rides
  • 9. JobsQuality of lifeAffordabilityFiscal benefits Real estate development
  • 10. The Secret Word: Walkability
  • 11. Washington’s History of Great Streets
  • 12. Where Pedestrians Rule: Beauty and Convenience• Compact Development• Interesting streetscape & public  realm• Notable Historic Character• Great destinations including  shopping districts, parks and public  realm• Neighborhood convenience
  • 13. Types of Walking• Rambling• Utilitarian Walking• Strolling, Lingering• Promenading• Special Events
  • 14. www.sustainable.dc.gov
  • 15. Where are we now? DC is already a leader in many areas of sustainability • 1st in purchasing green power  • 2nd in LEED green building pipeline • 1st in bike share participationWe are being measured against and are competing with major  cities that have embraced green and sustainable initiatives Boston New York City  Philadelphia
  • 16. Sustainable DC Topic Areas Built  Waste Energy Environment Green  Water Climate Economy Food Nature Transportation
  • 17. Ex. How to manage stormwater: LID or tanks? 
  • 18. Avg Monthly H+T CostsAvg. Monthly H+T Costs as a Percent of AMI
  • 19. H + T Index: Changing the Definition of Affordability
  • 20. The Indicator Species for Great Cities
  • 21. For more informationHarriet TregoningDirectorDistrict of Columbia Office of Planning1100 4th Street, SW, Suite E650Washington DC 20024202-442-7600harriet.tregoning@dc.govwww.planning.dc.govFacebook & Twitter @OPinDC

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