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    January 2013 centennial newsletter January 2013 centennial newsletter Document Transcript

    • The SPIRIT ABLAZE! V o l u m e 1 , I s s u e 1 Inside this issue: Centennial Newsletter M JANUARY0 1 2 N O V E B E R 2 2013Outstanding Alumnae Victoria P. Garchito- rena Salvacion M.Bulatao Cynthia B.Bautista 2,3,4 Lenore RS Lim { Two Days — a Lifetime to Remember } Deanna Go Bio Imelda C.Endaya Lina S.Umali Gloria D.SteeleThe SSpS Story 5-8Feb.2 Schedule 9 The C H S MArt Exhibit Update 10 CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION / 1913—2013Jubilarians’ Souvenir FEBRUARY 2 & 3 / 2 01 3 MENDIOLA / SMX Program 11Centennial Song grotto As the dates draw near, it is all systems GO! for theIn Wordless Converse different events planned. Months of discussions and 12Swatch article acacia trees preparations are drawing to an end, to finally welcome alumnae—local and from all over the world. bakol in the midol It will be a ‘coming home,’ a time to be young again mango trees with those we grew up with, crammed for exams German war ball with, attended our first parties with, spent countless hours on the phone with, shared the pains of adoles- catechism cence with, learned the same lessons with…. discipline Friendships during those schooldays have a unique and lasting bond. No matter how separate our paths,Acronymns canteen how many peaks and valleys we have gone through,CHSM—Mendiola school study period those memories, deeply guarded and treasured, giveCHSAF—CHS Alumnae Foundation us the security of loving and lasting sisterhood.CHSNAF—CHS No.America Fdn Ms. Hizon Let us cherish this time; and when the 2 days are over,CHSAF Postoffice: Manangs let our spirits soar with gratitude to the Triune God for chsaf.mla@gmail.com the blessing of being alumnae of this, our beloved chapel school.Prepared by Tita Dizon HS-63Editing assistance by Vicky Barretto-.Anastacio COLLEGE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT HS-63 We thank you.
    • Centennial Newsletter JANUARY 2013 Page 2 CENTENNIAL OUTSTANDING ALUMNAE continued from the NOV. issue The November Centennial Newsletter started featuring some of the cen- tennial awardees, and we continue with more in this issue. The articles on Centennial Coordinating Council Chairperson Victoria Pineda Garchitorena and Salvacion Munsayac Bulatao are from CHSAF’s website and the Facebook account. The rest are the awardees’ own reve- lations and testaments to what motivate them. Common to all awardees are the yearning to help others, and the love of God and fellow men— creeds we absorbed through our SSpS education. For detailed accomplishments of our awardees, go to <www.chsaf.faithweb.com> and <http://www.facebook.com/?sk=welcome#!/CHSAlumniFoundation?fref=ts> Ma. Victoria Pineda Garchitorena HS-60/BSChem-64 Vicky’s professional and personal experi- struggles for freedom, justice, and ence would make it look like … you name against corruption and can look back at a it, she has done it all. Possibly the only lifetime of charity and philanthropy, as field she has not ventured into was her she spent years with Ayala Foundation, first career choice; she graduated from working tirelessly to design and imple- CHSM with a BS-Physics, summa cum ment poverty alleviation programs. Her laude. Both the CHS Alumnae Foundation most successful initiatives are: GILAS, and her Alma Mater have acknowledged which Internet-enabled 3,300 public high that she is undoubtedly one of our most schools with computer labs, reaching mil- accomplished and outstanding alumnae lions of underprivileged youth; CENTEX, when it awarded her with a Lifetime which provided highest quality education Achievement Award. She has reached the to thousands of bright children from poor highest positions in corporations, nation- families; and Ayala Foundation USA, a al government, the NGO community, and diaspora philanthropy foundation that international organizations; she was at encouraged Filipino-Americans to donate the forefront through the country’s to Philippine NGOs.Salvacion Munsayac Bulatao AB/BSC-71 data and analysis ignored by the con- agency in 2001-2006 as Administrator trolled press. and led it to record annual performanc- Support for Enterprises In 1989-1999, es in herd buildup, milk production, she managed the Netherlands-based and establishment of new dairy zones. Oikocredit’s Philippine portfolio of She then became a consultant of the loans and equity investments for UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization credit, farm, hospital, and housing to develop an Asian strategy for small- cooperatives. After earning a Master hold dairying. She also worked with of Public Administration from the Har- the Federation of Free Farmers on the vard Kennedy School, she headed the formation of biofarming clusters in 10 Enterprise Center of the Asian Social provinces. Institute (ASI). She was elected an Since 2010 she has been the Agriculture ASI Trustee in 2007. Secretary’s Technical ManagementSally is proudest of her roles in IBONDatabank, enterprise strengthening, Agriculture Development As Planning Adviser for Foreign-Assisted Projects. Manager of the Philippine Dairy Cor-and agricultural development. CHSM Values. Sally’s career has been poration, 1988-1989, Sally drafted theShe co-founded IBON Databank in marked by love of country, preferential bill enacted years later as the Nation-1978 and played a leading role in it option for the poor, hard work, chal- al Dairy Development Act of 1995 anduntil 1988. IBON opposed martial lenge, fair play, and modest living. designed the dairy zone framework.rule by publishing socio-economic She returned to the government dairy
    • Centennial Newsletter JANUARY 2013 Page 3 Outstanding Alumnae continued from Page 2 Ma. Cynthia Rose Banzon Bautista HS-70 task as though to make a difference, even if through my work as professor/researcher, the difference is illusory. I owe the CHS department chair/ dean/policy research sisters the spiritual substantiation of this director, CHED Technical panel/Task Force/ internalized outlook of “engagement with Working Group Chair/Vice-Chair/Co-chair, detachment from outcomes.” They framed CHED commissioner, and member of personal engagements as missions through international advisory/management boards which God works for reasons we do not fully of research programs/academic presses. comprehend, to achieve outcomes beyond But the academic mission is just the surface. our control. Scratching the veneer, I think God gave me My career trajectory suggests an avowed a secure family life and just enough academic mission: To mentor students; academic credentials to help connect produce/disseminate knowledge; help my people, resolve conflicts, heal wounds, give My father taught me that university and other research institutions confidence to the less gifted and shepherd everything is ephemeral achieve academic excellence—for its sake transitions in communities, which happen to although he emphasized that I and, being a CHSian with reformist genes, be academic. ought to give myself to each for the sake of building a quality nation— As a young girl, I learned in the HGC the In gratitude and to share His gifts, I Lenore Raquel Santos-Lim values of Truth & Charity, the importance of founded the LRSL Foundation for the Arts HS–63 daily prayer, gratitude, service to others, to assist deserving Filipino artists develop discipline and humility. Living out these virtues their talents. I have conducted free print- in my daily adult life has given me a blessed making workshops and provided avenues circle of a wonderful family, friends and for emerging Filipino artists to exhibit communities I enjoy today. their works in foreign markets. As a college student, later as wife, mother, The Presidential Award, Pamana ng Pilipi- educator, artist, and community leader, I al- no, the Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant ways prayed to the Holy Spirit to guide me and the Outstanding awards from Univer- in all my decisions. For example, in my art, I sity of the Philippines Alumni Association & always begin with a prayer to bring God to CHS are my most significant awards which my work. And, with each production, I never I credit to the values instilled in me by my fail to thank God for His generous gifts. alma mater. Deanna Go Bio AB-58, BSE-59 ates, nurturing and guiding them to be not I am 74 years old and among the many only successful bankers but also successful defining moments in my life, the most conse- human beings. It also gave me the venue quential was my father’s fatal heart attack to provide opportunities for women. I am on my graduation day in 1962. It catapult- particularly gratified to provide jobs for ed me to full adulthood overnight. four immigrant women, abandoned by My success in managing one of my family spouses from pre-arranged marriages, businesses started me on the path of man- restore their dignity and rebuild their life. agement turnaround specialist, culminating I measure success not in material accumu- in a 30-year career in Citibank, New York lations but in the positive influence one where transforming marginal operations to wields on others. I hope to have perpet- high-performance workplaces established uated the CHSM legacy of integrity, com- my reputation as a turnaround manager. passion and excellence and to have led Operations management was a deliberate an examined life guided by wisdom and choice because it entailed managing peo- fortitude from the Holy Spirit to whom I ple. I volunteered to mentor new associ- open my heart with loving trust.T h e S P I R I T A B L A Z E !
    • Centennial Newsletter JANUARY 2013 Page 4 Outstanding Alumnae continued from Page 3 Imelda Cajipe Endaya I have integrated my personal and social tinctive. Art making is a process of personal HS-66 roles: woman, artist, citizen. A woman’s role meditation. It is labor as well. An artist’s life is is defined by her relationships: as daugh- made whole by the practice of one’s craft. ter, sister, wife, mother, grandmother, co- provider, home keeper, steward of envi- Nevertheless, an artist’s personal search must be synthesized with a collective consciousness. ronment. Early on I have had this passion arising from Being a fine artist is by itself elitist — one our postcolonial historical circumstance. Histor- has to have a vision, a distinct expression, ical research, immersion with community and mastery of medium, consistently striving for traditional culture-bearers, discourse and self- excellence. Yet these have to come as nat- criticism are tied up with this commitment. urally, as enjoyably as a bird chirping its Working towards social justice and identity as tune. Aesthetic satisfaction motivates me. I woman and as Filipino has been an endless have this natural urge to experiment with mission in my art-making. Yet I have to be colors and textures, and to create new understood by the ordinary. I have to speak forms that are hopefully unique and dis- to the world. Ma. Lina Suarez Umali HS-68 My parents and CHSM are admittedly the In a few years, perks, titles and honor lost major influences on who I am today. They their meaning. Instead of letting my consciously pushed me out of my comfort blessings create guilt, I focused on zone to believe that with hard work and motivation which gave me the stamina to prayers, I can achieve my goals. give back. I became instrumental in a non- profit organization whose mission is to help I heard that if one likes math, one can be an alleviate poverty in the Philippines by Actuary but few make it. With perseverance providing livelihood. As its current Chairman, and dedication, I became an Actuary. I believe that dole-outs do not last forever; Achieving this goal strengthened my faith in that the better way is to provide self- God. development programs; and the best After 6 years of hard work starting at an feeling is knowing I made a positive impact entry level position at a Big 4 Accounting on people’s lives. Firm, I became the first female Asian partner My CHSM education instilled in me the at the firm that was dominated by men. responsibility to help those who have less. All of us are given opportunities to make while mitigating hunger, especially among Gloria Diño Steele HS-70 a lasting impact on the lives of people the poor. In the 1990s, I led the creation less fortunate than us. For me, I saw such of a foundation that fostered the birth of opportunities in public service. Straight civil society in Eastern Europe shortly after out of college in 1974, I joined the Philip- the fall of the Berlin wall. In the mid- to pine Department of Agriculture where I late 2000s, I became the highest-ranking first got involved in helping to address civil servant in USAID’s global health oper- poverty and hunger. From 1980 to the ation, overseeing billions of dollars of as- present, I have spent my career in the sistance to countries around the world to U.S. Agency for International Develop- prevent illness among the poor due to com- ment (USAID), searching for the most municable diseases and to save the lives of effective approaches to help alleviate mothers and children. Since July 2010, I global poverty and make the world a have been serving as USAID’s Mission Di- better place for all. As an agricultural rector in the Philippines, the first Filipino- lives of the 26% of Filipinos who live in economist in the 1980s, I wrote USAID’s American to serve in this capacity since the poverty, fight corruption, improve the first policy paper on food security to inception of USAID in this country over 50 health of mothers and children, increase ensure that our development programs years ago. I have reoriented USAID’s access to higher-quality education, and addressed the needs of the farmers, program to focus on helping to improve the protect the environment.T h e S P I R I T A B L A Z E !
    • Centennial Newsletter JANUARY 2013 Page 5 This is the fifth of a series on the JOURNEY of the The S.SP.S. Story in the Philippines… SSpS congregation in the Philippines. With permission from the Publisher - the SSpS Rosary Province. Excerpts are reprinted Last paragraph of 4th installment from the book authored by Coylee Gamboa During the war, the “new building” was requisitioned by the Japanese Army. LED BY THE SPIRIT When schooling resumed in 1943, the classes were crammed into the other SSpS PHILIPPINES buildings. By 1944, even the interns’ dorm was used for classes. In 1945, the Americans took over the building and the school became a hospital. A JOURNEY OF A HUNDRED YEARS 1912—2012In June 1945, classes were held in vari- tides of change that swept ous locations, including the houses of over religious life. For the the Ferrers and Ubaldos and the lawns school, the impact of Vatican of the Cardenas, Paterno and Ubaldo II became evident in the families. The Americans vacated the change of name in 1965 to building they had occupied in Decem- College of the Holy Spirit of ber 1945, but classrooms remained in Manila (CHSM). short supply because enrollment was Changes were also taking bigger than it was before the war. To place in society due to a new solve the problem, the school adopted wave of nationalism coupled morning and afternoon sessions. with student activism in the and tensions arose. But, with prayer and Over the next 25 years, the school added late 1960s until the early 1970s. trust in God, the Sisters weathered the the Elementary Building (1947), the CHSM was both a spectator and partici- storm. Auditorium (1948), the Canteen (late pant in the First Quarter Storm of 1970. 1940s) the College Building (1956), the With the imposition of Martial Law in It was a spectator because it was wedged Annex (1961-62), the College Library September 1972 and student rallies for- between Malacanang Palace and the Annex (1964), a new Elementary Build- bidden, student activism took a quieter university belt and therefore witness to ing (1966) and the college Cafeteria route and attention once again focused the violent clashes between the students (1970). and the riot police and soldiers The college department offered new on Mendiola. It was also a par- courses in 1948. Two years later, more ticipant because colegialas courses were offered and five major aca- from CHSM joined other stu- demic departments were formed: Liber- dents in political action. al arts-Education, Home Economics Through the years, the Holy (later named Nutrition and Dietetics), Spirit Sisters had encouraged Fine Arts, Commerce and Science. the students to give catecheti- In the 1950s, maintaining that there was cal instruction in public a need for a higher level of collegiate schools and contribute to the excellence than that required by the mission work on Tuesdays, and on academics. In 1975, CHSM along with Bureau of Education, 11 Catholic Educa- the girls did so generously. By educating San Beda College, La Consolacion Col- tional Association of the Philippines them, encouraging them to think for lege and Centro Escolar University, (CEAP) institutions spearheaded a vol- themselves, instilling in them a heart for forged the Mendiola Consortium for untary accreditation movement. Holy the missions and prodding them to do academic cooperation. Ghost College passed the accreditation social work, the Sisters had stirred up and became a charter member of the the students’ social consciousness. In another significant move, in line with Philippine Accrediting Association of the government’s move to decongest Now, in the era of student activism, Mendiola, CHSM began to phase out its Schools, Colleges and Universities when old paradigms were being shat- grade school and high school depart- (PAASCU). tered, the Sisters were fearful for their ments in 1979. The process took six Vatican II “opened the windows of the students. The SSpS community was di- years. The students were accommodated church” and the SSpS was caught in the vided about the role they should take Continued on P. 6T h e S P I R I T A B L A Z E !
    • Centennial Newsletter JANUARY 2013 Page 6 S.Sp.S. Story… cont’d from Page 5 cated to the education and empowerment Dr. Co-Young achieved many firsts. She of women. was the first program director of the in the new School of the Holy Spirit in IPWI Graduate School in Jakarta; first CHSM began a two-year strategic planning BF Homes, Quezon City. program director of the Chiang Kai Shek exercise in 2000 which resulted in the deci- Graduate School; founding dean of San Then came the turbulence of the 1980s. sion to reinvent CHSM. In 2003, the Com- Beda College Graduate School of Busi- CHSM redefined its vision-mission mission on Higher Education (CHED) ness and first vice president for high statement and priorities. Participating granted CHSM autonomous status. The education and dean of the Graduate in political events such as the indigna- college department closed courses that School of Jose Rizal University. tion rallies after the assassination of were languishing and offered new ones Benigno Aquino in 1983 and the events tailored to the needs of the times. A Gintong Ina awardee, she is married leading up to the EDSA Revolution of to businessman Vicente Young with One of CHSM’s key decision in reinventing 1986, the SSpS community resolved to whom she has three children. itself was to partner more with the laity. journey with the young toward Chris- This bore fruit in the historic move to bring Fittingly, Dr. Co-Young is at the helm as tian nationalist values. in a layperson to manage the school. On CHSM gears up for its centennial anni- In the early 1990s, CHSM departments July 11, 2011, Prof. Felina Co-Young, DBA, an versary in 2013. were reorganized into Program Areas alumna of the school, became the first lay under one Dean of Academic Affairs. president of the college. Management system was adopted to She graduated cum laude, Bachelor of Arts allow greater collaboration and partici- in Mathematics from CHSM in 1969. She pation in the decision-making process obtained a Master in Mathematics (1991) of the college. and a doctorate in Business Administra- The quest for better learning opportu- tion (1996) from De La Salle University. nities for the students accelerated. She was awarded a Doctor of Philosophy From 1989 to 2000, CHSM forged in Management by the American World agreements with foreign counterparts University in the United States and a Dip- for the student-abroad programs. lomate in Business Management and In 2001, along with other private named outstanding educator by the Phil- ippine Council of Deans and Educators in Dr. Felina Co-Young being invested as the schools, CHSM put up the Consortium Business. 8th president of CHSM by Sr. Eden Pan- of Women Colleges, which was dedi- ganiban, Provincial Leader of PHN And the MISSION GROWS - establishments started College of the Holy Spirit, Manila Metro Manila, 1913-present Sacred Heart School, La Paz Abra, 1913-1928 Stella Maris School, Lubang Mindoro, 1923-1999 Holy Spirit Academy, Bangued Abra, 1923-2003 Sto. Tomas Academy, Sto. Tomas Batangas, 1925-1945 THE MISSION GROWS segment was started in the Holy Spirit Academy, Laoag Ilocos Norte, 1926-2001 Sept. Cent. Newsletter which said in part… Holy Spirit School, Tagbilaran Bohol, 1926-present Convent of the Holy Spirit, Baguio Benguet, 1928-present As God’s love welled up within the hearts of the Sis- Annunciata Academy, Bocaue Bulacan, 1933-1937 ters, their mission, though still in its infancy, like the Sta. Rosa Academy, San Nicolas Pangasinan, 1936-1974 Abra River flowing down from the Cordilleras, started Holy Ghost Convent, Grace Park Caloocan City, 1937-1941 to branch out when new assignments were received to start more schools. In just over a quarter century, the Holy Family Institute, Tayabas Quezon, 1937-1941 SSpS established 13 schools, 2 hospitals and 1 retreat St. Anthony’s Hospital, Manila Metro Manila, 1937-1939 and retirement facility. Holy Infant Academy, Calapan Mindoro, 1937-1998 Holy Ghost Hospital, Manapla Negros Occidental, 1938-1945 The love they showed, their life of poverty and the Christian values they taught endeared them to the Holy Ghost Academy, Malolos Bulacan, 1937-present people wherever they went.. College of the Holy Spirit, Tarlac Tarlac, 1940-present Continued on Page 7T h e S P I R I T A B L A Z E !
    • Centennial Newsletter JANUARY 2013 Page 7 When you pass through the waters, I will be with you, and through the rivers, they shall not overwhelm you. TURBULENT TIMES Isaiah 43:1 Just as white water signals rocks in the river, the bombing of targets in Luzon by the Japanese on December 8, 1941 indicated that there were turbulent times ahead not only for the Holy Spirit Congregation. Though their very lives were in peril, the Sisters continued to do their work. As the waters swirled around them, they could only call out as King David did to the One who gath- ers the waters. And God, with generous love and awesome THE mercy, turned to them. Some of the Sisters God took. The others God strengthened and stood by in the most difficult WAR YEARS of times for there was still work to be done. On December 8, 1941, World War II came to the Philippines, disrupting the school year but not the work of the Holy Spirit Sisters. They continued witnessing to God’s love, maybe not so much in words but certainly in action as they ministered to the people entrusted to their care. M ANILA — At the College, Sisters Camilliana, Crucifera and Respicia dence that Bishop Finnemann of Min- From mid-1942 to October 1943, Manila doro had generously let them use, had experienced a surreal truce. At Holy were celebrating their silver jubilee been destroyed by bombs. Ghost College, several hundred stu- when news of the bombing of Pearl dents were crammed into the two Shielded by God’s hand, the Mendiola Harbor reached the congregation. Fran- buildings not occupied by the Japanese. campus was spared destruction. The tic parents of interns came to take their In July 1944, the Sisters incarcerated at invaders took Manila on January 2nd daughters home. and occupied the schools including UST were transferred to the internment On December 23rd, Sister Provincial Holy Ghost College. They comman- camp in Los Banos, Laguna. Conditions Geroldine and her community in Grace deered the classrooms, kitchen, interns’ in Manila worsened and food became Park were ordered to leave their con- dining room and garden, leaving the scarce. vent. A second communication on Sisters only their chapel, refectory and On September 21, 1944, the Americans Christmas day ordered them to be out dormitory. began their attacks to liberate Manila. of the premises within an hour. Sister Hounded and facing death, the Japa- The campus was first used to quarter Superior Rhabana of the Holy Ghost American women and children as pris- nese turned vicious and began to sys- College and the SVD Fathers were able oners of war who were then transferred tematically sack churches, convents, to get two buses to help transfer the universities—whatever that was sacred to the University of Sto. Tomas Intern- entire Grace Park community to Mendi- or historical. ment Camp. ola. “That night, dark sheets of clouds from burning deposits of oil in Pan- Sr. Edelwina Hesse tried to develop The leaders of the Holy Spirit Commu- dacan made the Sisters feel that ‘hell friendly relations with the Japanese nity were advised not to keep so many had broken loose,” Sr. Geroldine re- officers who had a high regard for her. Sisters in Mendiola because its Japanese called. She was allowed to visit and bring pro- occupants made the campus a likely visions to the American Sisters at the target for the American liberating forc- Under international law, an open city is UST camp. With foresight, she encour- es. Seven sisters were sent to Malolos, one that has been declared demilita- aged Ms. Isabel Hizon, a teacher and seven to Sto. Tomas, Batangas, and two rized during a war, thereby giving it alumna, to learn Japanese. to Baguio. Covered by the pinions of immunity from attack. To prevent fur- God, the Sisters in Holy Ghost College ther destruction of Manila, then re- After the fall of Bataan and Corregidor, the Japanese permitted Sr. Edelwina to remained unscathed in those perilous nowned as the Pearl of the Orient, the days. Americans declared it an open city on open the school—subject to strict con- ditions. The Sister teachers had to learn On February 3, 1945, an advance unit of December 26. The Japanese aggressors Nippongo and the basic tenets of the the US Liberation Forces appeared at chose to ignore and the bombing of Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere, Mendiola. The Japanese hastily left exit- Manila continued. an Asia-for-Asians plan to disguise ing through the estero at the rear of the Later, the Sisters learned that their Japan’s hegemony. compound. Grace Park Convent, the elegant resi- Continued on Page 8T h e S P I R I T A B L A Z E !
    • Centennial Newsletter JANUARY 2013 Page 8 On April 5, 1945, the sisters received the S.Sp.S. Story… cont’d from Page 7 tragic news that all 15 Sisters in Sto. To- Note: The next issue will at- mas, Batangas, had died in an air-raid tempt to cover the 4 remaining The US Army transformed the college shelter. The church, the school and a phases of the congregation’s into a hospital. The Sisters were allowed good portion of the town lay in ashes. story. They will be abbreviated to use a small part of their living quar- Most of the people had fled to the moun- accounts of what the actual ters, but even the chapel was requisi- tains but the Sisters had dug for them- book holds, among them short tioned for the needs of the Army. For selves a shelter that became their grave. histories of the different estab- the first time in nearly 4 years, the Sis- lishments and missions started In most of the SSpS schools and missions, ters did not worry about their food as by the Sisters all over the Phil- the bombing caused death and devastation the US Army supplied their meals. In ippines. — in Laoag, San Nicolas and Tayum, return, the Sisters helped in hospital Bangued, Baguio, Tarlac, Malolos, Alumnae are encouraged to work and in the laundry. Lubang, Calapan, Manapla, Bohol and Los purchase a copy of the book Banos. Read the book for details. “LED by the SPIRIT” at the school book store. A ROARING Watch for the final installment CASCADE A) ROARING CASCADE, continuation B) THE TIDES OF CHANGE C) MOVING with the SPIRIT D) ENGULFED by GOD January 15, 2013 At the reinstallation of Sr. Eden Panganiban as Provincial Leader of the Rosary Province for another His voice sounded like the roar of a waterfall… 3 years, she said that the Leader- Revelations 1:15b ship Team gives its pledge to up- After World War II, education was a priority need so the Sisters established or hold the precepts of the founder administered schools wherever the Spirit led them. Like a cascade that could St. Arnold Janssen to give total not be contained, the Word went out, not just through catechism lessons but commitment to the missions of also by the example of their lives. the congregation. To accomplish this task, the Leadership Team will Going beyond the academe, the lack of personnel, they would give up require the dedication of the rest Sisters proclaimed the love of the some of these institutions. of the community. A resounding Triune God to those who have not The rapid expansion in their aposto- yet heard the Good News and to yes, as confirmation, was heard late was fueled in part by the number those whose faith needed strength- from the rest of the nuns. of Filipinas joining the congregation. ening. The first Filipina SSpS was Sr. Consue- The Mass and ceremony also Responding to other needs, the Sis- lo, nee Beatriz Lalin from Tayum, marked the end of the Centennial ters provided health care through Abra, who entered in the pre-war year of the S.Sp.S. congregation. clinics and hospitals, either owned or years. By its Golden Jubilee in 1962, administered by them. From the the congregation had 285 sisters of postwar years to 1965, the Sisters whom 135 were Filipinos. founded or administered 15 schools and 3 hospitals. Eventually, due to To be continuedT h e S P I R I T A B L A Z E !
    • Centennial Newsletter JULY 2012 Centennial Newsletter J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 3 Page 9 6 Page If you don’t know it yet, February popular demand will be for the February 2 - 2013 is no ordinary Homecom- old-time favorites—German Invitation and Program ing—and we are celebrating this bread and “Holy Cookies” - milestone in a truly special way. goodies baked by the nuns. Festivities start with registration Of special interest to educators Attire : Come in your MOST BLAZING attire followed by a full day of various and technology buffs is the Objectives : activities designed to engage the booth featuring CWOW 1. “come home” to our beloved CHSM young-at-heart and the ageless-in (Classroom WithOut Walls) – 2. create meaningful bonding moments -spirit. So it does not matter HS-73’s Centennial Legacy Pro- with fellow- alumnae and friends whether you can skip-n-hop ject which ushers in e-Learning 3. have FUN, FUN, FUN through the gates in Mendiola or to CHSM. Dr. Victoria Cajipe, need a little push over the scientist/inventor/extreme ad- PROGRAM: threshold to the old stomping venturer and CWOW’s main 8:30am–2:00pm Registration grounds around the old acacia architect will present her class’ tree—you are in for a day full of pet project with CHSM teachers. 10:00 - 1:45 Mid-Day Jamming w/Doc Larry surprises, of fun, of camaraderie, As an avid environmentalist she Song Renditions & Group Sing-along of throwing off all inhibitions and will also conduct a show-and-tell 10:00 - 10:15 Invocation-The Prayer, HS-68 to get up and jam with the inimi- session on solar power. Definite- National Anthem table Doc Larry. ly a Must-See Alma Mater Song, 2 versions And who is this Doc Larry? He is Finally, as good colegialas, we Welcome Remarks by CHSM described as a dentist who enjoys will participate in giving thanks President & CHSAF Presi- “jamming” and pulling teeth, al- in the newly air-conditioned Par- dent beit not simultaneously. The ver- aclete Auditorium. Immediately 10:15 – 10:45 Doc Larrys 1st segment satile Doc with his one-style-fits- after Holy Mass, our School will Canada & LA based alumnae all performance guarantees satis- acknowledge the achievements perform faction for audience of all ages - of her graduates in an award cer- 10:45 - 11:00 Toast to Class Reps no benchwarmers abound when emony - a fitting finale to a per- Group Singing—“Stand by Me” he is around. fect Homecoming Day! Norma Tecson Francia & But a CHSM Homecoming is not Has your interest been piqued Group Music 58/59 all song and dance. Booths have enough? Join us then for a day 11:00 - 11:45pm Doc Larrys 2nd segment mushroomed all around the cam- filled with great entertainment Ms. Tara de Leon-daughter of pus to proudly display the home- and proud recognition of alum- HS-74 alumna from LA grown, well-honed innovative nae exemplars in our midst. Adhoc participation by locals skills and entrepreneurial spirit A perfect Homecoming Day? 11:45 – 12:45 Lunch break, Raffle of our alumnae with an array of You bet ! products. A special one set up by 12:45 - 1:00 Meet your Scholar By Deanna Go Bio AB-58/BSC-59 Group singing—”Wind Beneath My Wings” Catered lunch at the gym… The gym’s capacity is 400 1:00 – 1:45 Doc Larrys 3rd & final set seated guests, so seat allocation will be on a “first paid, Louie Reyes & the New Min- first served basis.” Email your reservations and remit pay- strels ment of P400 (through your class rep) to LUCIA B. QUIMSON Las Vegas Chapter to perform BPI Espana-UST branch SA # 0153-3597-17. Centennial Song to be led by There will be a variety of food booths for those not partak- Sokit de Castro Landsberg ing of the catered buffet lunch. Gangnam Dance to be led by CHSNAF, Toronto Chapter The office of President Felina Co-Young issued this message regarding 12nn – 2:00 Lunch for 100 Awardees the Feb. 2 Testimonial Lunch for the Centennial Awardees. 2:00-3:30 Concelebrated Centennial The testimonial lunch (12:00-2:00) offered by the school for the Mass led by Bishop Bacani, awardee and a companion will be at the Freinademetz Hall. Guests of Auditorium awardees who wish to join the lunch should get in touch with Remy 3:30-5:30 Award Ceremony, Auditorium (735-6021) or Grace (735-5989/chspresident@yahoo.com).T h e S P I R I T A B L A Z E !
    • Centennial Newsletter JANUARY 2013 Page 10 A Showcase of Women’s Excellence Postcard design by Chi Panistante Taken from a Press Release for the Cen- tennial Art Exhibit: February 1, 2013 to March 27, 2013 Cultural Center of the Philippines Exhibiting artists are all alumnae of the CHSM Leading the lineup of artists are Imelda Chi Panistante, an accomplished graphic collage about the life of social activist Cajipe Endaya, recipient of the CCP Cen- designer who has lived in Dubai for eleven Betty Makoni. tennial Honors for the Arts, and New-York years, presents her circular compositions Rona Buenaseda-Chua, art teacher and based Lenore RS Lim, recognized as one of reflective of the efficient dynamism of every- owner of Rona’s Art Center, exhibits her the “100 Most Influential Filipina Women day life in UAE, illumined by her strong Bibli- delicate still life works in pencil and in the US.” cal perspective. watercolors. Elaine Ongpin Herbosa, plein They organized artistic contributions from Mimi Tecson, who recently concluded a 3- -air painter and owner of the gallery L’Arc accomplished alumnae in different parts of month art residency in Yokohama Japan, en Ciel, shows her delightful pictures, the world to form this collection as an ex- created new sculptural assemblages espe- landscapes and interiors. Pastel paintings pression of gratitude to College of the Holy cially for this show. Veteran artist Rhoda of lush marshes and waters by the late Spirit whom they credit for the strength of Recto unveils her recent watercolor land- Gracia Gargantiel are part of the collec- their inner formation. scapes inspired by the classic letras y figuras. tion. There are lithographs by Rosita Endaya’s polymer collage entitled Emi Masigan Mercado’s canvases are evi- Tayag Natividad, Chinese paintings by “Kasibulan” on middle-age woman’s blos- dences of her strength in fine portraiture. Maria Antonia Gonzalez-Cruz, and digital soming, and Lim’s lithograph series Celine G. Borromeo, professor and interior art by Tiffany Elaine Ty. “Simple Abundance” with colorful chine designer, shows her landscapes in pastel and “High Spirit” the exhibition represents colle are highlights of the exhibition. chalk, and illustrations “For Now and Life- the spirit of excellence in various modes Aurora Go Bio Shakespeare, an industrial times Ago” and “Circles with Open Ends.” of articulation. The artworks selected and graphic designer from Mallorca Spain, Athena Santos Magcase Lopez, painter and altogether inspire viewers into looking at participates with “Angel Wings” and children’s book illustrator from New Jersey, art as a humanly integrative and creative “Flight” from a series of abstract floral shares with us her landmark illustrations for process. forms depicting empowered femininity. “The Magic Jeepney,” and a mixed media The different mediums used by our artists: taken from Wikipedia.com Polymer collage…Artist quali- artist to print on a much more Pastel is an art medium in the Chinese painting in the tradi- ty acrylic paints are composed delicate surface, such as Japa- form of a stick, consisting of pure tional style involves essentially of pigment suspended in pure nese paper or linen powdered pigment and a binder. the same techniques as calligra- acrylic emulsion. phy and is done with a brush Watercolor—the most basic Mixed media refers to a work of dipped in black or colored ink. Lithography is a method for technique is the flat wash pro- visual art that combines various printing using a stone/metal duced by first wetting the area traditionally distinct visual art Digital art is a general term for a plate with a completely of paper to be covered, then media. range of artistic works and prac- smooth surface. mixing sufficient pigment to tices that use digital technology Plein air is used to describe the act easily fill the entire area. as an essential part of the crea- Chine-collé is a technique in of painting outdoors to catch nat- tive and/or presentation process. printmaking which allows the ural light.T h e S P I R I T A B L A Z E !
    • Centennial Newsletter JANUARY 2013 Page 11 HERE WE ARE Cover design by MRS DESIGNS, digital artworks Centennial Song The 2013 By Socorro de Castro Landsberg HS-67 Souvenir Program Our school days I thought were gone forever As life went on we went our sep’rate ways But there are things I can’t forget The CHS 2013 Souvenir Pro- The fun, the tears, the fears we had gram is a project of the High The laughter and the joy we left behind. School Class of 1963, this years Golden Jubilee Class. Seems so long ago we were together It will be released on Our friendship has endured the test of time Through ups and down we stood by February 2 during the Home- one another coming at CHSM. Copies will The mem’ry stays on clearly in my mind. also be available at SMX MOA during the Centennial Refrain: Gala on February 3. (Oh) Now, looking back to what we’ve had All the mem’ries that we’ve shared From the S. P. Committee: Cecilia M. Dimagiba & Victoria B. Anastacio Feels like you’re so near and yet We’re so far away As in any Homecoming souvenir PRE-ORDERS But now, comes a once-in-a-lifetime chance program, the centerpiece will be the Just for us to meet again We will only accept group pre- pages of celebrating classes: orders from jubilarian and non- We can’t let it slip away HS 1948 (Platinum Jubilee) jubilarian classes. For non-jubilarian So, here we are. HS 1953 (Diamond Jubilee) classes, pre-orders should be in mul- HS 1958 (Emerald Jubilee) tiples of 5. Class reps to notify me College 1963 (Golden Jubilee) Our school days I always will remember <ceciliadimagiba@yahoo.com.ph> HS 1963 (Golden Jubilee) The joy and pain of growing up in school via email on or before Jan 25. HS 1968 (Sapphire Jubilee) It taught me life more than just books HS 1973 (Ruby Jubilee) and A. Cost - P400 It taught me truth more than just looks HS 1967 (Coral Jubilee) B. Payments must be made by It brought out strength and confidence in me. In their pages, the different classes Monday, Jan.28th to have celebrated what they hold Union Bank (any branch) The gratitude I owe our Alma Mater most important to them in their life Account # 00 0560031051 Is way beyond what words alone can do in our school—and they have cho- (Greenbelt Branch) I need my heart to help express it better sen to express their celebration in Name: Cecilia M. Dimagiba The best years of my youth widely different ways! Immediately email a scanned Were spent with you. The pages contain, among others, deposit slip as proof of payment. Repeat refrain the 100 Outstanding Alumnae C. Delivery Coda: Awardees including the Alumna of All pre-ordered books will be picked the Century, a short history of What a school that gave us roots up only by the different class reps CHSM, short features on "High Spir- That shaped our lives from the CHSAF office between 9am it" the coming Centennial Art Exhib- Then wings to fly with dignity, with pride. and 10am. it, and "Journey of a Hundred Years" All pre-orders will be processed on a the musical drama presentation on first come first served basis. the SSpS congregation. Above is the cover of the CHSM 2013 ON-SPOT SALES (not pre-ordered) Centennial Souvenir Program de- of the Souvenir Program will be on signed by HS-63 artist Maggie Revil- Feb. 2 (watch for signs indicating la-Simpliciano of MRS DESIGNS. allotted time to sell) and on Feb. 3 at The book has 184 pages at 8.5” x 11”, P500. is in full color, and uses 220 lb paper for the cover and matt 120 lb paper for the inside pages.T h e S P I R I T A B L A Z E !
    • Centennial Newsletter JANUARY 2013 Page 12 A BOOK TO BE EXPERIENCED! “No tribute to her Alma Mater could be better expressed by Iluminada than her anthology. This is one of the Centennial blessings that the College of Holy Spirit, Manila, could be grateful for and joyfully share with countless readers.” SR. EDEN PANGANIBAN, S.Sp.S, AB-BSE-71 Provincial Leader - S.Sp.S. Rosary Province, Philippines “In her In Worldless Converse, Iluminada gently unknots the delicate strands of humanity’s existence. It unravels the inimitable yearnings of the heart, a spiritual journey from pain to consciousness to an embracing view of beingness and life.” DR. FELINA CO YOUNG, President, HS-65 College of the Holy Spirit, Manila, Philippines IN WORDLESS CONVERSE - Love Has Greater Stories To Tell Than Sorrow is a unique book of profound spiritual experiences of a lifetime written by Ms. Iluminada “Lou” Samaniego in the sublime language of poetry. It is a book that invites you to tread into the universality of the human condition leaping out of the verses as you read deeply into her lines, starting with her trilogy of “An Easter Bouquet” - “Origins”, “Winter Visions”, & “Dialogue of Awakening.” IN WORDLESS CONVERSE combines the artistic verses of Ms. Samaniego and photographic images for an inspir- ing anthology of spiritual poetry. It is a worthy addition to any spiritual library collection. Beautifully designed and bound, it makes for good reflective reading and is a meaningful Christmas, Easter, and other special occasion gift to friends and relatives. Retail price is P300. Please email the author or the publisher at <inwordlessconverse@gmail.com> for further inquiries or to place an order, Dear Fellow Alumni, Iluminada invites you, not only to join her to the depths of her being, All of us, in our own ways, are en- but hopefully to be guided to your As published in the Philippine Daily Inquirer thusiastically preparing for our December 30, 2012 own depths where you will find Alma Mater’s Centennial. Him, Who IS there but is some- Mother and daughter Cynthia Cordero Sarte of Our classmate, Iluminada “Lou” times either ignored or not per- HS Class’75 and Cyrene Thistle Sarte of SHS Samaniego, always considered her ceived in the hustle-bustle of our GS’97 both liked the commemorative Swatch Alma Mater as her real second fast-paced lives. watch designed for The College of the Holy home, a place in which she sought Though these poems started out as Spirit’s Centennial Celebration in 2013, and they solace and refuge, especially in her a personal expression of Ilu- readily posed for this pictorial to excite other moments of deep pain as she was minada’s innermost thoughts and alumnae to wear it during the whole-year cele- growing up. As such, she has opted feelings, one can read deeply into bration. to introduce for the benefit of her lines and note the universality CHSM a unique and novel gift: that of the human condition and varied The Swatch of her private thoughts and reflec- emotions leaping out of the verses. design in- tions in a sublime literary language: corporates poetry. As a true daughter of the It is in this vein that we – together the Centen- school, she found the upcoming with those who have endorsed the nial logo Centennial year a fitting occasion to book (Sr. Eden Panganiban, S.Sp.S. which fol- present her anthology of spiritual and Dr. Felina Co Young) – offer to lows the poetry. the CHS alumni Iluminada’s rich celebration anthology as a worthy addition to theme Spirit In Wordless Converse – Love Has any spiritual library collection. Ablaze 2013! Better Stories to Tell Than Sor- The flames symbolize the high spirits which will row is a pilgrimage in verse, span- Blessings of the Spirit, welcome alumnae from all over the world as ning decades of angst, pain, sorrow, Gloria Ocampo-Reyes they converge in their alma mater’s campus on joy, lightheartedness, conflicts, re- HS-64 Class Chairperson Feb.2 and the Centennial Gala on Feb.3 which alizations, resolutions, quests, etc…. will be held at SMX Mall of Asia.T h e S P I R I T A B L A Z E !