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Hard ip based SoC design

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IP Based SoC Design

IP Based SoC Design

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  • 1. Hard IP based SoC Design E.Prabakaran
  • 2. Outline  Introduction  Challenges  Reusable Components  Communication-Based Design  Platform-Based Design  Networks On-Chip
  • 3. Chip Overview  Several millions of transistors available  A processor core needs only some hundred K gates  Several processors fit on one chip
  • 4. Reuse  Transistors increases 60% / year  Design productivity increases 20% / year  Design gap is growing  Combat by reuse  Reuse by IPRs  Requires new specification, methodology and tools
  • 5. Challenges  Core-based       design solves all problems? Maybe, but several challenges remain: Core description System description Core intercommunication Verification Production volume
  • 6. Reusable Components  Intellectual Property (IP)  Intellectual Property Rights (IPR)  Synthesizable Core – Technology Independent  Soft Core – Technology Dependent Netlist  Firm Core – Technology Dependent Netlist  Hard Core – Fixed Layout
  • 7. Synthesizable Core  High-Level Description (e.g. VHDL or Verilog)  Functional Verification Completed  Synthesis is required  Layout is required  Size and Speed not predictable
  • 8. Soft Core  Technology Dependent Gate-Level Netlist  May be parameterizable  Layout is required  Size and Speed somewhat predictable  Floorplanning guidelines necessary
  • 9. Firm Core  Encrypted Black-Box  Technology Dependent Gate-Level Netlist  Floor-planning guidelines available  Layout is required  Size and Speed highly predictable
  • 10. Hard Core  Encrypted Black-Box  Technology Specific Layout  Size and Speed Determined  May cause routing blockages and problems with chip layout  Not portable to other vendors
  • 11. Why use Hard Cores
  • 12. Why use Hard Cores  Implementation  Level Microarchitecture Level  Specialized Logic Architecture  Application Specific Processor Core  General Purpose Processor Core  Architecture Level  Component and Communication Selection
  • 13. Why use Hard Cores  High Performance  Low Power Consumption  Predictable  Memories  Processor Cores  FPGAs  Analog and Mixed Signal Cores
  • 14. Questions  Q: What is the difference between soft cores and firm cores?  A: Firm cores are secret and the systems company never get information of the internal architecture.  Q: What advantages do hard cores have?  A: High performance, low power, small, predictable
  • 15. Area Constraint  Since it is in the form of Layout  The size can not be changed  It occupies more area comparing with Soft core based cell  Constraints are pre defined and generated layout