ConingAs the helicopter develops lift during takeoff and flight, thethe blade tips rise above the straight-out position an...
ConingResultant: The combined effects of centrifugal force and liftcause the blades to assume a coned position.The angle b...
Causes of excessive coning•Low rotor RPM = Loss of centrifugal force•High gross weight = More lift required•High “G” maneu...
Effects of excessive coning•Decreased rotor area and useful lift•Stress on blades and blade roots            Resultant or ...
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Conning

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Conning

  1. 1. ConingAs the helicopter develops lift during takeoff and flight, thethe blade tips rise above the straight-out position and assumea coned position.Primary forces involved:Centrifugal Force: The force which tends to make rotating bodiesmove away from the center of rotationCentrifugal force adds rigidity to the rotor blade, causing it to assumea straight-out positionLift: As the collective is increased and lift develops, the blades respond byrising above the straight-out position
  2. 2. ConingResultant: The combined effects of centrifugal force and liftcause the blades to assume a coned position.The angle between the straight-out position and the pathflown by the blades is the coning angle.Some amount of coning is normal, however, excessive coningcan create problems t u ltan Res Lift Centrifugal Force
  3. 3. Causes of excessive coning•Low rotor RPM = Loss of centrifugal force•High gross weight = More lift required•High “G” maneuvers = More lift required•Turbulence = Updrafts increase angle of attack,which increases coefficient of lift which increases lift
  4. 4. Effects of excessive coning•Decreased rotor area and useful lift•Stress on blades and blade roots Resultant or effective lifting area Lift Centrifugal Force

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