Academic Writing<br />Plagiarism<br />
Plagiarism<br />Plagiarism means submitting work that is not your own for an assignment or an exam.<br />For a serious cas...
Read Harvard_Guidelies.pdf<br />This file explains how the Greenwich wants you to cite references.  You need to follow it....
Only one source = Plagiarism<br />According to Greenwich policy, this is true.<br />Why?<br />
Examples of plagairism<br />Copying from a book or a website without changing anything.<br />
Wikipedia<br />As a result of several land reform measures, Vietnam is now the largest producer of cashew nuts with a one-...
Examples of plagairism<br />Copying from a book or a website, changing a few words, but not adding “quotes” or giving a re...
Wikipedia<br />As a result of several land reform measures, Vietnam is now the largest producer of cashew nuts with a one-...
How to use quotes without plagiarizing<br />If you want to copy text from a book or a website.  Use “quotation marks” and ...
Wikipedia<br />As a result of several land reform measures, Vietnam is now the largest producer of cashew nuts with a one-...
Wikipedia<br />As a result of several land reform measures, Vietnam is now the largest producer of cashew nuts with a one-...
Examples of plagairism<br />Copying from only one book or website, changing some words, giving references, but <br />witho...
Good Bibliography<br />Student handbook 2003-2004 for PGCE, School of Education and Training, University of Greenwich<br />
Bad Bibliography<br /> .<br />PLAGIARISM<br />
Is it plagiarism?<br />Writing something that is not different from what the teacher taught in class.<br />Is it always ba...
Plagiarism<br />You may use information from the lecture notes of this class but please use “quotes” and references just l...
What if I do my coursework together with my friends?<br />PLAGIARISM!<br />“submitting joint coursework as an individual e...
Will the teacher really know that I was working with my friends?<br />When students do not work together, their ideas are ...
Will the teacher really know that I was working with my friends?<br />It is usually easy for the teacher to know when stud...
What if my friend copies my coursework?<br />Some teachers may choose to punish both students equally.<br />(See next slid...
Do not copy files from other students at this school!<br />
Four days later…<br />
Đêkhi! Chaien and Xêkô’s code looks just like yours. <br />Hi<br />Teacher!<br />Did you guys copy?<br />
WHAT???<br />I didn’t give my code to Chaien and Xêkô!<br />Then how did they get your file?<br />
Earlier that week…<br />
Hey Xuka, I just got a new camera.  Come to my house and I’ll show it to you.<br />Oh, I’d love to! But…<br />
I have to stay home and work on my c++ assignment.  I didn’t finish yet.  It’s really hard.<br />
That’s OK.  I’ll give you my code.  You can use it for reference.  But don’t copy it cause then we’ll both get 0 marks.<br...
The next day…<br />
Hi Nobita.<br />HI XUKA!<br />
Just let me see Đêkhi’s code for one<br />PLEEEEASE?<br />I promise I won’t copy it.<br />second<br />
A little later at the playground…<br />
NOW!<br />Let’s have a look at that C++<br />code!<br />Ok,Ok. Fine.  I’ll let you see the code.  Just don’t copy it.<br /...
Don’t give your code to ANYONE!<br />You are responsible if other students copy your files!<br />
More of Greenwich Plagairism policy <br />The following are all examples of plagiarism:<br /><ul><li>Using code not writte...
Adapting code not written by yourself without giving references.
Paying someone else to write code for you
Memorizing lecture notes and reproducing them on an exam.
Submitting an assignment from a previous course</li></li></ul><li>What happens if I plagiarise?<br />
Richard Feynman<br /><ul><li>Nobel Prize-winning Physicist
Author of popular books and films about science</li></li></ul><li>How do you test when you have learned something about sc...
A story from Richard Feynman...<br />
On the weekends, my father would take me for walks in the woods. [...] and we learned all about nature...<br />
The next day, Monday, we were playing in the fields and this boy said to me, &quot;See that bird standing on the stump the...
I said, &quot;I haven&apos;t got the slightest idea.&quot;<br />?<br />
He said, &quot;It’s a brown-throated thrush. <br />Your father doesn&apos;t teach you much about science.&quot;<br />Brown...
my father had already taught me that the name doesn&apos;t tell me anything about the bird. <br />Brown-throated Thrush<br />
He taught me &quot;See that bird? It&apos;s a brown-throated thrush,<br />Brown-throated Thrush<br />
but in Germany it&apos;s called a halsenflugel<br />Halsenflugel<br />
and in Chinese they call it a chung ling<br />Chung Ling<br />
and even if you know all those names for it, you still know nothing about the bird<br />Nothing<br />
Now that thrush sings, and teaches its young to fly, and flies so many miles away during the summer across the country, an...
[In a first grade science book]... there is a picture of a dog<br />Science, Grade 1<br />
a windable toy dog, <br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />
and underneath it the question “what makes it move?”<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />What makes it move?<br />
Later on, there is a picture of a real dog and the question, &quot;What makes it move?&quot;<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1...
Then there is a picture of a motorbike and the question, &quot;What makes it move?&quot;<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br ...
The answer was in the teacher&apos;s edition of the book: &quot;energy makes it move.&quot;<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<...
But nothing whatsoever is learned.<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />(Teacher’s edition)<br />Energy makes it move!<br />
?<br />
Without using the word &quot;energy,&quot; tell me what you learned about the dog&apos;s motion...<br />sd<br />Science, G...
You cannot. <br />So you learned nothing about science from this book.<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />Energy makes it ...
If you can not explain what you learned using your own words then you don’t really know anything.<br />
Can you remember this?:<br />s&apos;&apos;$/=2048;while(&lt;&gt;){G=29;R=142;if((@a=unqT=&quot;C*&quot;,_)[20]&48){D=89;_=...
Testing intelligence<br />Universities often test for intelligent understanding of information by asking students to defin...
&quot;In the context of...&quot;<br />Define “planning” in the context of project management:<br />Planning is one of the ...
&quot;In the context of...&quot;<br />Define “planning” in the context of a project to design a company logo:<br />In a lo...
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Fpt Aw Plagiarism

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Fpt Aw Plagiarism

  1. 1. Academic Writing<br />Plagiarism<br />
  2. 2. Plagiarism<br />Plagiarism means submitting work that is not your own for an assignment or an exam.<br />For a serious case of plagiarism Greenwich may ask the student to leave the university permanently.<br />
  3. 3. Read Harvard_Guidelies.pdf<br />This file explains how the Greenwich wants you to cite references. You need to follow it.<br />
  4. 4. Only one source = Plagiarism<br />According to Greenwich policy, this is true.<br />Why?<br />
  5. 5. Examples of plagairism<br />Copying from a book or a website without changing anything.<br />
  6. 6. Wikipedia<br />As a result of several land reform measures, Vietnam is now the largest producer of cashew nuts with a one-third global share and second largest rice exporter in the world after Thailand. <br />Hans<br />As a result of several land reform measures, Vietnam is now the largest producer of cashew nuts with a one-third global share and second largest rice exporter in the world after Thailand. <br />PLAGIARISM!<br />
  7. 7. Examples of plagairism<br />Copying from a book or a website, changing a few words, but not adding “quotes” or giving a reference.<br />
  8. 8. Wikipedia<br />As a result of several land reform measures, Vietnam is now the largest producer of cashew nuts with a one-third global share and second largest rice exporter in the world after Thailand. <br />Hans<br />After some changes in land-ownership laws, Vietnam became the largest producer of cashew nuts, with 33% of the world market, and second largest exporter of rice after Thailand. <br />PLAGIARISM<br />
  9. 9. How to use quotes without plagiarizing<br />If you want to copy text from a book or a website. Use “quotation marks” and give a reference to tell the reader from where you copied the information.<br />It’s NOT plagiarism if you tell the reader exactly which part you copied. <br />
  10. 10. Wikipedia<br />As a result of several land reform measures, Vietnam is now the largest producer of cashew nuts with a one-third global share and second largest rice exporter in the world after Thailand. <br />OK<br />Hans<br />“As a result of several land reform measures, Vietnam is now the largest producer of cashew nuts with a one-third global share and second largest rice exporter in the world after Thailand.” (Wikipedia, 2009)<br />
  11. 11. Wikipedia<br />As a result of several land reform measures, Vietnam is now the largest producer of cashew nuts with a one-third global share and second largest rice exporter in the world after Thailand. <br />OK<br />Hans<br />Vietnam is one of the world’s leading exporters of cashews and rice. (Wikipedia, 2009)<br />
  12. 12. Examples of plagairism<br />Copying from only one book or website, changing some words, giving references, but <br />without adding any of your own ideas.<br />
  13. 13. Good Bibliography<br />Student handbook 2003-2004 for PGCE, School of Education and Training, University of Greenwich<br />
  14. 14. Bad Bibliography<br /> .<br />PLAGIARISM<br />
  15. 15.
  16. 16. Is it plagiarism?<br />Writing something that is not different from what the teacher taught in class.<br />Is it always bad?<br />Greenwich university policy says this IS plagiarism.<br />
  17. 17. Plagiarism<br />You may use information from the lecture notes of this class but please use “quotes” and references just like when you copy from a website.<br />
  18. 18. What if I do my coursework together with my friends?<br />PLAGIARISM!<br />“submitting joint coursework as an individual effort... [is] plagiarism.” – Greenwich Student Handbook<br />
  19. 19. Will the teacher really know that I was working with my friends?<br />When students do not work together, their ideas are usually very different.<br />When two students have similar ideas, it’s usually because they are communicating.<br />
  20. 20. Will the teacher really know that I was working with my friends?<br />It is usually easy for the teacher to know when students are working together. Many universities in Viet Nam do not do anything to punish students’ whose papers are similar. <br />But this is not the habit of English schools. Remember, even if you didn’t copy, working together on an assignment that isn’t a group-project is still plagiarism.<br />
  21. 21. What if my friend copies my coursework?<br />Some teachers may choose to punish both students equally.<br />(See next slide)<br />
  22. 22. Do not copy files from other students at this school!<br />
  23. 23. Four days later…<br />
  24. 24. Đêkhi! Chaien and Xêkô’s code looks just like yours. <br />Hi<br />Teacher!<br />Did you guys copy?<br />
  25. 25. WHAT???<br />I didn’t give my code to Chaien and Xêkô!<br />Then how did they get your file?<br />
  26. 26. Earlier that week…<br />
  27. 27. Hey Xuka, I just got a new camera. Come to my house and I’ll show it to you.<br />Oh, I’d love to! But…<br />
  28. 28. I have to stay home and work on my c++ assignment. I didn’t finish yet. It’s really hard.<br />
  29. 29. That’s OK. I’ll give you my code. You can use it for reference. But don’t copy it cause then we’ll both get 0 marks.<br />Ok. Thanks Đêkhi. <br />I promise I won’t copy your code.<br />
  30. 30. The next day…<br />
  31. 31. Hi Nobita.<br />HI XUKA!<br />
  32. 32. Just let me see Đêkhi’s code for one<br />PLEEEEASE?<br />I promise I won’t copy it.<br />second<br />
  33. 33.
  34. 34. A little later at the playground…<br />
  35. 35.
  36. 36. NOW!<br />Let’s have a look at that C++<br />code!<br />Ok,Ok. Fine. I’ll let you see the code. Just don’t copy it.<br />Ok?<br />
  37. 37. Don’t give your code to ANYONE!<br />You are responsible if other students copy your files!<br />
  38. 38. More of Greenwich Plagairism policy <br />The following are all examples of plagiarism:<br /><ul><li>Using code not written by yourself, without quoting and referencing
  39. 39. Adapting code not written by yourself without giving references.
  40. 40. Paying someone else to write code for you
  41. 41. Memorizing lecture notes and reproducing them on an exam.
  42. 42. Submitting an assignment from a previous course</li></li></ul><li>What happens if I plagiarise?<br />
  43. 43. Richard Feynman<br /><ul><li>Nobel Prize-winning Physicist
  44. 44. Author of popular books and films about science</li></li></ul><li>How do you test when you have learned something about science?<br />“Without using the new word which you have just learned, try to rephrase what you have just learned in your own language.&quot;<br />from The Physics Teacher Vol. 7, issue 6, 1968, pp. 313-320<br />
  45. 45. A story from Richard Feynman...<br />
  46. 46. On the weekends, my father would take me for walks in the woods. [...] and we learned all about nature...<br />
  47. 47. The next day, Monday, we were playing in the fields and this boy said to me, &quot;See that bird standing on the stump there? What&apos;s the name of it?&quot;<br />?<br />
  48. 48. I said, &quot;I haven&apos;t got the slightest idea.&quot;<br />?<br />
  49. 49. He said, &quot;It’s a brown-throated thrush. <br />Your father doesn&apos;t teach you much about science.&quot;<br />Brown-throated Thrush<br />
  50. 50. my father had already taught me that the name doesn&apos;t tell me anything about the bird. <br />Brown-throated Thrush<br />
  51. 51. He taught me &quot;See that bird? It&apos;s a brown-throated thrush,<br />Brown-throated Thrush<br />
  52. 52. but in Germany it&apos;s called a halsenflugel<br />Halsenflugel<br />
  53. 53. and in Chinese they call it a chung ling<br />Chung Ling<br />
  54. 54. and even if you know all those names for it, you still know nothing about the bird<br />Nothing<br />
  55. 55. Now that thrush sings, and teaches its young to fly, and flies so many miles away during the summer across the country, and nobody knows how it finds its way...<br />Nothing<br />
  56. 56. [In a first grade science book]... there is a picture of a dog<br />Science, Grade 1<br />
  57. 57. a windable toy dog, <br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />
  58. 58. and underneath it the question “what makes it move?”<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />What makes it move?<br />
  59. 59. Later on, there is a picture of a real dog and the question, &quot;What makes it move?&quot;<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />What makes it move?<br />
  60. 60. Then there is a picture of a motorbike and the question, &quot;What makes it move?&quot;<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />What makes it move?<br />
  61. 61. The answer was in the teacher&apos;s edition of the book: &quot;energy makes it move.&quot;<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />(Teacher’s edition)<br />Energy makes it move!<br />
  62. 62. But nothing whatsoever is learned.<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />(Teacher’s edition)<br />Energy makes it move!<br />
  63. 63. ?<br />
  64. 64. Without using the word &quot;energy,&quot; tell me what you learned about the dog&apos;s motion...<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />Energy makes it move!<br />
  65. 65. You cannot. <br />So you learned nothing about science from this book.<br />sd<br />Science, Grade 1<br />Energy makes it move!<br />
  66. 66. If you can not explain what you learned using your own words then you don’t really know anything.<br />
  67. 67. Can you remember this?:<br />s&apos;&apos;$/=2048;while(&lt;&gt;){G=29;R=142;if((@a=unqT=&quot;C*&quot;,_)[20]&48){D=89;_=unqb24,qT,@ b=map{ord qB8,unqb8,qT,_^$a[--D]}@INC;s/...$/1$&/;Q=unqV,qb25,_;H=73;O=$b[4]&lt;&lt;9 |256|$b[3];Q=Q&gt;&gt;8^(P=(E=255)&(Q&gt;&gt;12^Q&gt;&gt;4^Q/8^Q))&lt;&lt;17,O=O&gt;&gt;8^(E&(F=(S=O&gt;&gt;14&7^O) ^S*8^S&lt;&lt;6))&lt;&lt;9,_=(map{U=_%16orE^=R^=110&(S=(unqT,&quot;xb tdxbzx14d&quot;)[_/16%8]);E ^=(72,@z=(64,72,G^=12*(U-2?0:S&17)),H^=_%64?12:0,@z)[_%8]}(16..271))[_]^((D&gt;&gt;=8 )+=P+(~F&E))for@a[128..$#a]}print+qT,@a}&apos;;s/[D-HO-U_]/$$&/g;s/q/pack+/g;eval<br />Your ability to remember information is not what makes you intelligent. <br />http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/DeCSS/Gallery/qrpff.pl(This is the famous 7 lines of perl code that cracks the encryption used in DVD’s. It was used as evidence in court to show that the DVD decription algorithm was simple enough to be memorized.)<br />
  68. 68. Testing intelligence<br />Universities often test for intelligent understanding of information by asking students to define a term in the context of a case study. <br />Assignments 2 and 3 in this course do that.<br />If students write about Multiview only, many students would only repeat what they read in the book.<br />
  69. 69. &quot;In the context of...&quot;<br />Define “planning” in the context of project management:<br />Planning is one of the five process groups. It refers to the administrative tasks that must be completed before the execution of the project can begin. Planning tasks include writing a schedule, preparing a WBS, and estimating costs.<br />
  70. 70. &quot;In the context of...&quot;<br />Define “planning” in the context of a project to design a company logo:<br />In a logo design project, planning would include meeting with the customer to ask for suggestions and requirements. For example, find out if the company has any special colors or symbols. Ask about where the logo will be used and what kind of feeling the company wants the customers to have when they see the logo. Planning may also include looking at the logos of similar companies or doing preliminary sketches.<br />
  71. 71. &quot;In the context of...&quot;<br />Define “speed” :<br />Speed is a non-directional measurement of velocity. It may refer to the instantaneous rate of an object’s motion through space or in a more abstract sense, to the rate of completion of a task. It is usually measured as a fraction:<br />
  72. 72. &quot;In the context of...&quot;<br />Define “speed” in the context of typing:<br />Typing speed is a measure of how quickly a typist produces useful documents. In its simplest form, it is computed by dividing the number of words typed by the time. For example, 100 words in 2 minutes is a speed of 50 words per minute. But typing speed usually considers accuracy too. If a typist produces text at a rate of 100 words per minute but misspells 10% of the words, then the speed must be adjusted to account for the time spend correcting the errors.<br />
  73. 73. Links to more information about plagairism and Greenwich Policies<br /><ul><li>Harvard Guidelines for Referencing Sources https://cms1.gre.ac.uk/collaborativeprogrammes/teachingmaterials/COMP1305/ReportWriting/HarvardGuidelines.pdf
  74. 74. Prof. Ray Stoneham’s Report about how to write a report https://cms1.gre.ac.uk/collaborativeprogrammes/teachingmaterials/COMP1305/ReportWriting/REPORT%20WRITING.pdf
  75. 75. The Elements of Style: A good, short guide to academic English grammar. http://sites.google.com/site/sirhans/Home/academic-writing---fpt-greenwich/ElementsofStyle.pdf?attredirects=0</li>

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