• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

Participatory research

on

  • 11,761 views

an Introduction

an Introduction

Statistics

Views

Total Views
11,761
Views on SlideShare
11,755
Embed Views
6

Actions

Likes
4
Downloads
166
Comments
0

1 Embed 6

http://www.visiblevoice.info 6

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Apple Keynote

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • The relevance of participatory research to health promotion is also signaled by the very definition of health promotion as...[Slide] <br /> Participatory research is variously defined in the broad, multidisciplinary research traditions that have supported its development, particularly adult education and community development. Peter Park and others in a recent book on Participatory Research in Canada and the U.S., described it as a self-conscious..[slide <br /> You might well ask, &#x201C;Where is the research in this description?&#x201D; We proposed a more formal definition of participatory research as &#x201C;Systematic investigation involving the active learning of people effected, for the purpose of action. &#x201C; <br />
  • The relevance of participatory research to health promotion is also signaled by the very definition of health promotion as...[Slide] <br /> Participatory research is variously defined in the broad, multidisciplinary research traditions that have supported its development, particularly adult education and community development. Peter Park and others in a recent book on Participatory Research in Canada and the U.S., described it as a self-conscious..[slide <br /> You might well ask, &#x201C;Where is the research in this description?&#x201D; We proposed a more formal definition of participatory research as &#x201C;Systematic investigation involving the active learning of people effected, for the purpose of action. &#x201C; <br />
  • The relevance of participatory research to health promotion is also signaled by the very definition of health promotion as...[Slide] <br /> Participatory research is variously defined in the broad, multidisciplinary research traditions that have supported its development, particularly adult education and community development. Peter Park and others in a recent book on Participatory Research in Canada and the U.S., described it as a self-conscious..[slide <br /> You might well ask, &#x201C;Where is the research in this description?&#x201D; We proposed a more formal definition of participatory research as &#x201C;Systematic investigation involving the active learning of people effected, for the purpose of action. &#x201C; <br />
  • The relevance of participatory research to health promotion is also signaled by the very definition of health promotion as...[Slide] <br /> Participatory research is variously defined in the broad, multidisciplinary research traditions that have supported its development, particularly adult education and community development. Peter Park and others in a recent book on Participatory Research in Canada and the U.S., described it as a self-conscious..[slide <br /> You might well ask, &#x201C;Where is the research in this description?&#x201D; We proposed a more formal definition of participatory research as &#x201C;Systematic investigation involving the active learning of people effected, for the purpose of action. &#x201C; <br />
  • The relevance of participatory research to health promotion is also signaled by the very definition of health promotion as...[Slide] <br /> Participatory research is variously defined in the broad, multidisciplinary research traditions that have supported its development, particularly adult education and community development. Peter Park and others in a recent book on Participatory Research in Canada and the U.S., described it as a self-conscious..[slide <br /> You might well ask, &#x201C;Where is the research in this description?&#x201D; We proposed a more formal definition of participatory research as &#x201C;Systematic investigation involving the active learning of people effected, for the purpose of action. &#x201C; <br />
  • The relevance of participatory research to health promotion is also signaled by the very definition of health promotion as...[Slide] <br /> Participatory research is variously defined in the broad, multidisciplinary research traditions that have supported its development, particularly adult education and community development. Peter Park and others in a recent book on Participatory Research in Canada and the U.S., described it as a self-conscious..[slide <br /> You might well ask, &#x201C;Where is the research in this description?&#x201D; We proposed a more formal definition of participatory research as &#x201C;Systematic investigation involving the active learning of people effected, for the purpose of action. &#x201C; <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />

Participatory research Participatory research Presentation Transcript

  • Participatory Research An introduction
  • The Expert Science Model of Research
  • The Expert Science Model of Research Assumptions
  • The Expert Science Model of Research Assumptions existing knowledge and expertise of the researcher is of primary importance
  • The Expert Science Model of Research Assumptions existing knowledge and expertise of the researcher is of primary importance Observations and data analysis is best done by the researcher
  • The Expert Science Model of Research Assumptions existing knowledge and expertise of the researcher is of primary importance Observations and data analysis is best done by the researcher Process
  • The Expert Science Model of Research Assumptions existing knowledge and expertise of the researcher is of primary importance Observations and data analysis is best done by the researcher Process Topic identified and defined by the researcher
  • The Expert Science Model of Research Assumptions existing knowledge and expertise of the researcher is of primary importance Observations and data analysis is best done by the researcher Process Topic identified and defined by the researcher Subjects selected according to the researcher’s criteria
  • The Expert Science Model of Research Assumptions existing knowledge and expertise of the researcher is of primary importance Observations and data analysis is best done by the researcher Process Topic identified and defined by the researcher Subjects selected according to the researcher’s criteria Subjects studied using techniques determined by the researcher
  • The Expert Science Model of Research Assumptions existing knowledge and expertise of the researcher is of primary importance Observations and data analysis is best done by the researcher Process Topic identified and defined by the researcher Subjects selected according to the researcher’s criteria Subjects studied using techniques determined by the researcher Researcher carries out analysis and publishes results
  • Criticisms of the Expert Model of Research
  • Criticisms of the Expert Model of Research Loss of “Traditional Knowledge”
  • Criticisms of the Expert Model of Research Loss of “Traditional Knowledge” Research techniques work in the lab but not in the field
  • Criticisms of the Expert Model of Research Loss of “Traditional Knowledge” Research techniques work in the lab but not in the field Knowledge creation is power- concentration of power in the hands of a few
  • Criticisms of the Expert Model of Research Loss of “Traditional Knowledge” Research techniques work in the lab but not in the field Knowledge creation is power- concentration of power in the hands of a few Sustainable change cannot be achieved by an expert elite
  • Participatory Research is...
  • Participatory Research is... “ ...a self-conscious way of empowering people to take effective action toward improving conditions in their lives.”
  • Participatory Research is... “ ...a self-conscious way of empowering people to take effective action toward improving conditions in their lives.” Park, P. (1993) “What is Participatory Research?” Voices of Change. Toronto: OISE Press
  • Participatory Research is... “ ...a self-conscious way of empowering people to take effective action toward improving conditions in their lives.” Park, P. (1993) “What is Participatory Research?” Voices of Change. Toronto: OISE Press A Systematic investigation
  • Participatory Research is... “ ...a self-conscious way of empowering people to take effective action toward improving conditions in their lives.” Park, P. (1993) “What is Participatory Research?” Voices of Change. Toronto: OISE Press A Systematic investigation That actively involves people in a mutual learning process
  • Participatory Research is... “ ...a self-conscious way of empowering people to take effective action toward improving conditions in their lives.” Park, P. (1993) “What is Participatory Research?” Voices of Change. Toronto: OISE Press A Systematic investigation That actively involves people in a mutual learning process For the purpose of social action conducive to their health or quality of life.
  • Participatory Research is... “ ...a self-conscious way of empowering people to take effective action toward improving conditions in their lives.” Park, P. (1993) “What is Participatory Research?” Voices of Change. Toronto: OISE Press A Systematic investigation That actively involves people in a mutual learning process For the purpose of social action conducive to their health or quality of life. new services, resource allocation, regulation or policy
  • Benefits of Participatory Research
  • Benefits of Participatory Research Combines Research+Education+Action
  • Benefits of Participatory Research Combines Research+Education+Action Can match resources with the perceived and actual needs of communities
  • Benefits of Participatory Research Combines Research+Education+Action Can match resources with the perceived and actual needs of communities Places research into a realistic community context
  • Benefits of Participatory Research Combines Research+Education+Action Can match resources with the perceived and actual needs of communities Places research into a realistic community context Align communities with the existing health resources and scientific knowledge
  • Some Other Names
  • Some Other Names Participatory Action Research (PAR)
  • Some Other Names Participatory Action Research (PAR) Action Research
  • Some Other Names Participatory Action Research (PAR) Action Research Participative Research
  • Some Other Names Participatory Action Research (PAR) Action Research Participative Research Collaborative Inquiry
  • Some Other Names Participatory Action Research (PAR) Action Research Participative Research Collaborative Inquiry Emancipatory Research
  • Some Other Names Participatory Action Research (PAR) Action Research Participative Research Collaborative Inquiry Emancipatory Research Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA)
  • How much participation? Least Participation Most Participation Laboratory Research Community Action
  • Origin of the Research Question
  • Origin of the Research Question • Did the original idea for the research project come from someone in the community?
  • Origin of the Research Question • Did the original idea for the research project come from someone in the community? • Is the research question or issue supported by members of the community?
  • Purpose of the Research
  • Purpose of the Research • Is the purpose of the research to facilitate the empowerment of individuals, groups or the community?
  • Purpose of the Research • Is the purpose of the research to facilitate the empowerment of individuals, groups or the community? • Will the project help participants (and others) to deal with factors that influence their health and that of their community
  • Involving People
  • Involving People • What the types of people will be involved?
  • Involving People • What the types of people will be involved? • Do participants have experience with the issue of interest?
  • Involving People • What the types of people will be involved? • Do participants have experience with the issue of interest? • Do interested community members have opportunities to participate?
  • Involving People • What the types of people will be involved? • Do participants have experience with the issue of interest? • Do interested community members have opportunities to participate? • Have barriers to participation been identified?
  • Involving People • What the types of people will be involved? • Do participants have experience with the issue of interest? • Do interested community members have opportunities to participate? • Have barriers to participation been identified? • Have you given special attention to groups or individuals who have been under-represented in the past?
  • Involving People • What the types of people will be involved? • Do participants have experience with the issue of interest? • Do interested community members have opportunities to participate? • Have barriers to participation been identified? • Have you given special attention to groups or individuals who have been under-represented in the past? • How will participants contribute to the project?
  • Benefits of the Research
  • Benefits of the Research • Can participants learn to take greater control over their lives by taking part?
  • Benefits of the Research • Can participants learn to take greater control over their lives by taking part? • Does the project support and enable collaboration among community members and existing resources?
  • Benefits of the Research • Can participants learn to take greater control over their lives by taking part? • Does the project support and enable collaboration among community members and existing resources? • Does the project recognise and attempt to address important political, social and economic factors
  • Is Research Educational and Capacity Building
  • Is Research Educational and Capacity Building • Does the research make positive use of knowledge & community resources?
  • Is Research Educational and Capacity Building • Does the research make positive use of knowledge & community resources? • Does the process allow for learning about research methods?
  • Is Research Educational and Capacity Building • Does the research make positive use of knowledge & community resources? • Does the process allow for learning about research methods? • Does the process allow for flexibility and change in methods and focus?
  • Is Research Educational and Capacity Building • Does the research make positive use of knowledge & community resources? • Does the process allow for learning about research methods? • Does the process allow for flexibility and change in methods and focus? • Are there ways of talking about and valuing experiences during the project?
  • Outcomes
  • Outcomes • Will community members benefit from both the process and outcomes of the project?
  • Outcomes • Will community members benefit from both the process and outcomes of the project? • Do community members benefit from being intimately involved in the design, planning, implementation, evaluation and dissemination of the project?
  • Outcomes • Will community members benefit from both the process and outcomes of the project? • Do community members benefit from being intimately involved in the design, planning, implementation, evaluation and dissemination of the project? • Is there a clear agreement for resolving differences, ownership of data and dissemination or sharing of results?
  • Participatory Research with Marginalised Groups
  • Participatory Research with Marginalised Groups • They may not understand research and/or have the background to conceptualise programs
  • Participatory Research with Marginalised Groups • They may not understand research and/or have the background to conceptualise programs • They often do not have time for research
  • Participatory Research with Marginalised Groups • They may not understand research and/or have the background to conceptualise programs • They often do not have time for research • They may not understand informed consent or confidentiality
  • Participatory Research with Marginalised Groups • They may not understand research and/or have the background to conceptualise programs • They often do not have time for research • They may not understand informed consent or confidentiality • They may not distinguish between academics and government; and trust neither
  • Participatory Research with Marginalised Groups • They may not understand research and/or have the background to conceptualise programs • They often do not have time for research • They may not understand informed consent or confidentiality • They may not distinguish between academics and government; and trust neither • It takes time to build trust & mutual understanding of relevant topics
  • Issues in Participatory Research with Marginalized Groups
  • Issues in Participatory Research with Marginalized Groups • They may have different forms of networking and communication (e.g.., no phones or day-timers)
  • Issues in Participatory Research with Marginalized Groups • They may have different forms of networking and communication (e.g.., no phones or day-timers) • Their lives may be unpredictable, inconsistent or “chaotic”
  • Issues in Participatory Research with Marginalized Groups • They may have different forms of networking and communication (e.g.., no phones or day-timers) • Their lives may be unpredictable, inconsistent or “chaotic” • They may not tell you they don’t like the research (or you); they may just drop-out
  • But Remember
  • But Remember • Not all research has to be participatory
  • But Remember • Not all research has to be participatory • BUT All research should be as participatory as possible
  • But Remember • Not all research has to be participatory • BUT All research should be as participatory as possible • Evidence and research are social constructions
  • But Remember • Not all research has to be participatory • BUT All research should be as participatory as possible • Evidence and research are social constructions • People must be motivated to participate; enabled to take action; and rewarded for their efforts.