Untie your tongue
Speaking Skills in the FL classroom
Elena Moreno Fuentes and Luisa María Palacios Maroto
TESOL-Spain 35t...
Biodata! 2
Abstract! 2
Introduction! 3
Students’ & Teachers’ difficulties! 4
Pedagogical Framework! 4
Activities! 5
Biblio...
Biodata
Elena Moreno Fuentes Luisa M. Palacios Maroto
Elena Moreno Fuentes, associate
P r o f e s s o r a t t h e E s c u ...
Introduction
“You live a new life for every new language you speak. If you only know one language, you
live only once.” (C...
Students’ & Teachers’ difficulties
Students Teachers
Lack%of%fluency
Stage%fright
Lack%of%confidence
Use%of%L1
Lack%of%time
...
Activities
Fluency
Speed dating.
Crazy chat.
Speak your colour.
Speaker’s corner.
Who gets the goodies?6
Accuracy
Grammar
...
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Atay, D. 2005. Reflections on the
Cultural Dimension of Language
Teaching. Language and Intercultural
Communi...
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Handout untie your tongue

  1. 1. Untie your tongue Speaking Skills in the FL classroom Elena Moreno Fuentes and Luisa María Palacios Maroto TESOL-Spain 35th Annual Convention • Bilbao • Saturday, 10th March 2012 Elena Moreno Fuentes • emoreno@fundacionsafa.es Luisa María Palacios Maroto • luisapalacios@myenglishcorner.net 1
  2. 2. Biodata! 2 Abstract! 2 Introduction! 3 Students’ & Teachers’ difficulties! 4 Pedagogical Framework! 4 Activities! 5 Bibliography! 6 Elena Moreno Fuentes • emoreno@fundacionsafa.es Luisa María Palacios Maroto • luisapalacios@myenglishcorner.net 1
  3. 3. Biodata Elena Moreno Fuentes Luisa M. Palacios Maroto Elena Moreno Fuentes, associate P r o f e s s o r a t t h e E s c u e l a Universitaria de Magisterio “Sagrada Familia” and at the University of Jaén. She has participated in courses on using ICT in the L2 classroom and published papers on the issue of ICT in teaching. Moreover, she is finishing her postgraduate studies and doing research on the implementation of ICT in the development of L2 Writing. Luisa Palacios Maroto, experienced teacher and researcher. She has taken active part in different L2 teaching courses and talks on using ICT in the L2 classroom . Active teacher and great motivator develops her job on Cambridge exams preparation. Moreover, she is finishing her postgraduate studies at the University of Jaén on cinema and literature. Abstract Whenever we try to get our students to participate in the classroom, no excited faces are found around us. We will offer activities to enhance students to use English as a means of communication. A dynamic approach is proposed for acquiring basic speaking skills since we believe that using dynamic exercises is an effective motivator to create “appropriate pieces of communication”. Elena Moreno Fuentes • emoreno@fundacionsafa.es Luisa María Palacios Maroto • luisapalacios@myenglishcorner.net 2
  4. 4. Introduction “You live a new life for every new language you speak. If you only know one language, you live only once.” (Czech proverb) Many English students complain that they understand English, but don't feel confident enough to join a conversation and follow it fluently. In this sense, teachers try to create artificial scenarios for the practice of oral skills in the ESL classroom; however, speaking activities usually fail due to some common problems faced by every single teacher all around the world. Speaking activities require a student to have all eyes on him and exposure to an audience can often give students stage fright. They may also be worried about making mistakes, being criticized or losing face in front of the rest of the class, they think that they lack the strategies necessary to overcome the problems they face when speaking and they can use in L1. As well, teachers sometimes face problems in making adequate pairing due to the difference of age between students and the necessity to create as many opportunities as possible to expose them to the language, which sometimes is stressful and counterproductive. Our presentation will be mainly divided into three parts. Basically, we will start by introducing the theoretical and pedagogical framework, which shapes the use of speaking activities in the ESL classroom. Secondly, we will roughly analyze some common problems faced in our classrooms, which have become the basis for the design of the activities we intend to show. In this sense, and taking those problems as starting point, we will interact with the audience in the development of the activities. These activities are fluency oriented, but also focused on grammar, vocabulary and accuracy. Moreover, we will also focus on small talk, which makes conversation more effective and natural. As noticed with all the previously stated, we make our students bust the frontier of speaking and going beyond. 3
  5. 5. Students’ & Teachers’ difficulties Students Teachers Lack%of%fluency Stage%fright Lack%of%confidence Use%of%L1 Lack%of%time Lack%of%creativity Embarrassment Noise Pedagogical Framework 4
  6. 6. Activities Fluency Speed dating. Crazy chat. Speak your colour. Speaker’s corner. Who gets the goodies?6 Accuracy Grammar Tic-Tac-Toe. Board Games. Vocabulary Picture games. Jenga. Paul’s games. Taboo. Post-it games. Pronunciation Tongue Twister Race. 5
  7. 7. BIBLIOGRAPHY Atay, D. 2005. Reflections on the Cultural Dimension of Language Teaching. Language and Intercultural Communication 5, 3, 222-236. Barrington, E. 2004. Teaching to student diversity in higher education: how Multiple Intelligence Theory can help. Teaching in Higher Education 9:4, 421-434. Brown, H. D. 1994. Principles of Language Teaching and Learning. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall Regents. Bruton, A. 2005. Task-based language teaching: For the state secondary FL classroom? Language Learning Journal 31, 1, 55-68. Bueno González, A. 2008. “TEFL food for thought: Some teaching principles revisited”, in A. Linde López, J. Santana Lario, C. M. Wallhead Salway (coords.) in Studies in honour of Neil Mclaren: a man for all seasons, 1-16. Bygate, M. 1987. Speaking. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Craft, A. 2001. Neuro-linguistic Programming and learning theory. The Curriculum Journal 12, 1, 125-136. Davis, P., B. Garside and M. Rinvolucri. 1998. Ways of Doing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Frank, C. and M. Rinvolucri. 1991. Grammar in Action Again: Awareness Activities for Language Learning. Hemel Hempstead: Prentice Hall. Larsen-Freeman, D. (1986). Techniques and principles in language teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Littlewood, W. (1981). Language teaching. An introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Littlewood, W. 1992. Teaching Oral Communication: A Methodological Framework. Oxford: Blackwell. Lozanov, G. 1999. Methodologies in Foreign Language Teaching. A brief historical overview. Available in http:// www.linguatics.com/methods.htm (02/01/12) Lynch, T. 1996. Communication in the Language Classroom. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Puchta, H. and M. Schratz. 1993. Teaching Teenagers. Canterbury and Harlow: Pilgrims Longman. Richards, J.C. & T.S. Rodgers 2001. A p p r o a c h e s a n d M e t h o d s i n Language Teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Rinvolucri, M. 1984. Grammar Games. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Savignon, S., & Berns, M. S. (Eds.). (1984). Initiatives in communicative language teaching. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley. Stern, H.H. 1983. Fundamental Concepts of Language Teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Tejada Molina, G., Mª L. Pérez Cañado & G. Luque Agulló 2005. “Current approaches and teaching methods”, in N. McLaren, D. Madrid & A. Bueno (eds.) TEFL in Secondary Education. Granada: Editorial Universidad de Granada, 156-209. 6

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