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  • Our two co-founders, Ray and Peter Ray studied Moore ’ s law for 20 years and observed that once any domain or discipline becomes grounded in information properties, that it goes into an esponential growth path and nothing will shake it off that path after that. Peter is the main driver behind SU. Xprize, and now the NYT best-seller Abundance
  • We pivot around the idea that the acceleration we ’ ve seen in computing (Moore ’ s law) is impact many other fields. E.g. biotech and DNA sequencing a $1000 laptop 10 years ago had the equivalent computing power of the brain of an insect today is the equivalent of the brain of a mouse in 10 years it ’ ll be the equivalent of one human brain and in 35 years, all 8 billion human brains. The question is: what would we do with that?
  • SU is 3.5 years old Hosted at NASA Ames (There are 10 NASA centers around the country, Ames is where they do all the R&D and supercomputing) We received initial funding from Google, CIsco, Autodesk, Nokia Genentech and a few individuals
  • Two key observations came out of this. First, Larry Page said “ if you ’ re bringing the top thinkers in the world together, then focus on the biggest problems - we don ’ t have enough smart, thoughtful people addressing global challenges. The second, and most important, is the observation that some of our global challenges are rooted in accelerating and exponential factors. Pandemics, aspects of climate change and the financial crisis are all examples. Note that the financial crisis was caused by an utter lack of understanding of the acceleration in the underlying derivatives and other instruments.
  • so our mission is to teach a new class of leaders about these technologies and how to leverage them to solve our biggest problems. Key point: these technologies are all doubling in their price performance anywhere from 18-30 months, so a solution layered on them can scale to a global level if part of the world is linear and a growing part is exponential, that ’ s causing a lot of stress. (e.g. Arab Spring). But also it means opportunity. If we don ’ t address global challenges with technology, then we often end up in war, and war is an expensive way of progressing humanity. Technology is arguably the leading way in which we ’ ve progressed civilization
  • We teach these 12 disciplines. The core technologies are We think of the resource tracks as how would you manage these technologies We think of energy, space and the environment as application areas where we deploy these technologies. our major challenge when we started was a curricular one. How do you take 12 very broad subjects and squeeze them into a short program while still delivering value? That was our big risk when we launched - nobody had ever tried this before
  • in each of those 12 areas we have some of the top thinkers in the world come and speak [give 2-3 examples]
  • We run a series of programs to achieve our goals, The heart of it is a 10-week summer program
  • We select based on three key criteria... We received 1200 applicants in our first year. This past year, we had over 4000 applicants from 110 countries
  • The students come and live with us for 10 weeks on the NASA campus For the first half of the summer, they receive about 300 hours of lectures from 160 different speakers on the Future of all the tracks. We spend 80% of our time focused on the future rather than the past. (Note: most academics thinks about the past - how did this model evolve, how did this equation develop, etc). During the second half of the summer...
  • they work on what we call the 10^9th challenge. They form teams focused on one of the grand challenges (e.g. water, or poverty). Their objective is to design a product or service that leverages the acceleration inherent in these technologies to positively impact a billion people. They have 3 weeks - off you go!
  • We pivot around the idea that the acceleration we ’ ve seen in computing (Moore ’ s law) is impact many other fields. E.g. biotech and DNA sequencing a $1000 laptop 10 years ago had the equivalent computing power of the brain of an insect today is the equivalent of the brain of a mouse in 10 years it ’ ll be the equivalent of one human brain and in 35 years, all 8 billion human brains. The question is: what would we do with that?
  • We pivot around the idea that the acceleration we ’ ve seen in computing (Moore ’ s law) is impact many other fields. E.g. biotech and DNA sequencing a $1000 laptop 10 years ago had the equivalent computing power of the brain of an insect today is the equivalent of the brain of a mouse in 10 years it ’ ll be the equivalent of one human brain and in 35 years, all 8 billion human brains. The question is: what would we do with that?
  • We pivot around the idea that the acceleration we ’ ve seen in computing (Moore ’ s law) is impact many other fields. E.g. biotech and DNA sequencing a $1000 laptop 10 years ago had the equivalent computing power of the brain of an insect today is the equivalent of the brain of a mouse in 10 years it ’ ll be the equivalent of one human brain and in 35 years, all 8 billion human brains. The question is: what would we do with that?
  • We pivot around the idea that the acceleration we ’ ve seen in computing (Moore ’ s law) is impact many other fields. E.g. biotech and DNA sequencing a $1000 laptop 10 years ago had the equivalent computing power of the brain of an insect today is the equivalent of the brain of a mouse in 10 years it ’ ll be the equivalent of one human brain and in 35 years, all 8 billion human brains. The question is: what would we do with that?
  • We pivot around the idea that the acceleration we ’ ve seen in computing (Moore ’ s law) is impact many other fields. E.g. biotech and DNA sequencing a $1000 laptop 10 years ago had the equivalent computing power of the brain of an insect today is the equivalent of the brain of a mouse in 10 years it ’ ll be the equivalent of one human brain and in 35 years, all 8 billion human brains. The question is: what would we do with that?
  • We pivot around the idea that the acceleration we ’ ve seen in computing (Moore ’ s law) is impact many other fields. E.g. biotech and DNA sequencing a $1000 laptop 10 years ago had the equivalent computing power of the brain of an insect today is the equivalent of the brain of a mouse in 10 years it ’ ll be the equivalent of one human brain and in 35 years, all 8 billion human brains. The question is: what would we do with that?
  • We pivot around the idea that the acceleration we ’ ve seen in computing (Moore ’ s law) is impact many other fields. E.g. biotech and DNA sequencing a $1000 laptop 10 years ago had the equivalent computing power of the brain of an insect today is the equivalent of the brain of a mouse in 10 years it ’ ll be the equivalent of one human brain and in 35 years, all 8 billion human brains. The question is: what would we do with that?
  • We ’ ve now spun out 25 of these startups and the faculty and staff mentor and guide many of them. About 15 are still alive.
  • For example, this team looked at the rise of 3D printing, control systems and materials science and noticed that in the construction industry, the way we build houses hasn ’ t changed in several thousand years. So they built a giant 3d printing that looks a bit like a car wash that will fabricate a 2-bedroom house in a day and a half. Today they can build a 3m load-bearing wall in concrete and they ’ re expanding that to do the whole house. Obviously this would be hugely useful after an earthquake
  • After 2-3 years, we ’ re just starting to see the model bite. This is our very first startup ‘ Getaround ’ . They won the big TechCrunch contest in 2011.
  • We pivot around the idea that the acceleration we ’ ve seen in computing (Moore ’ s law) is impact many other fields. E.g. biotech and DNA sequencing a $1000 laptop 10 years ago had the equivalent computing power of the brain of an insect today is the equivalent of the brain of a mouse in 10 years it ’ ll be the equivalent of one human brain and in 35 years, all 8 billion human brains. The question is: what would we do with that?
  • this team from 2011 was focused on poverty. they noticed that in Africa, 85% of the roads get washed out during the wet season. Well, how do you alleviate poverty if you simply can ’ t move anything around?
  • in the middle of the summer, Chris Anderson (editor of Wired Magazine) came and gave a about drones. He ’ s creating an open source DIY community around these things. This gave the students an idea. In telephony, Africa skipped the whole wireline generation and went straight to wireless. They ’ ll never have the money to put roads in, so what if they did that in transportation?
  • So they designed the Matternet. An internet IP address system for food and medicine. Kind of a next-gen pony express for medicine and food. The key to it is that these drones are doubling in their price performance every 10 months. Today, one of these drones can carry a 2kg package up to 10km. by early next year, they ’ ll go 20 km. And so on. So that solution can really scale.
  • in 2010, we piloted a contest. A mini xprize with a Brazilian university to find a great student. We guaranteed them a slot and with their 10,000 alumni and students, ran a contest
  • incredibly 230 projects were conceived
  • in 2011, we ran contests for a dozen students that resulted in 500 projects and this year we ’ re running contests for 23 students from 17 countries.
  • These are the six key takeaways: - technology is moving faster - we can leverage them to achieve abundance in a number of areas - we are seeing increasingly disruptive convergence in these areas - we focus on the future rather than the past - we think big - we are extremely entrepreneurial and collaborative

Gabriel baldinucci sumit welcome Gabriel baldinucci sumit welcome Presentation Transcript

  • FoundersSingularity University was foundedin Sept 2008 by Drs. Ray Kurzweil& Peter Diamandis
  • Stress & Opportunity
  • September 2008 Founding ConferenceNot for Duplication/Distribution | Copyright Salim Ismail | 2009-2011
  • Larry Page – Go Big Observation - many of our grand challenges are rooted in accelerating factors“Are you working on something that can change the world? Yes or no?The answer for 99.99999% of people in the world is ‘no.’ I think we need tobe training people on how to change the world. Obviously technologies arethe way to do that. That’s what we’ve seen in the past, that’s what driven allthe change.” - Larry Page, Google Co-Founder at SU founding conference
  • MissionOur mission is to assemble,educate and inspire a newgeneration of leaders who strive tounderstand and facilitate thedevelopment of exponentiallyadvancing technologies to address Disruptivehumanity’s grand challenges Stress/ Opportunity
  • GSP Academic TracksTechnology Tracks Application Tracks• Artificial Intelligence & Robotics • Energy &• Nanotechnology & Digital Fabrication Environmental Systems• Networks & Computing Systems • Space & Physical• Biotechnology & Bioinformatics Sciences• Medicine & NeuroscienceResource/Mgmt Tracks• Futures Studies & Forecasting• Policy, Law & Ethics• Design• Finance & Economics• Entrepreneurship
  • Examples of Advisory Faculty & Speakers Other Notable: •Sebastian Thrun, Stanford AI, GoogleX; Founder – Udacity •Saul Griffith, PhD, Eyeglasses, Squid Labs, Instructables.com, Makani Power •Dan Kammen, PhD – Lead Author, 2007 Nobel Peace Prize-winning IPCC report; Faculty, UC Berkeley •Bob Metcalfe, PhD, Founder, 3Com; co- inventor of Ethernet •Chris DiBona, Open Source ProgramVint Cerf Will Wright George Smoot, Dean Kamen Manager, Google Inc. PhD •Larry Smarr, PhD, California Inst. forChief Internet Creator – SimCity, Inventor, Spore; Founder, Telecom & ITEvangelist, Google UC Berkeley; 2006 Founder DEKA •Chris deCharms, PhD, Founder Maxis (EA) Nobel Prize in Omneruon Physics •Tim Ferriss, Author- 4-hour WorkweekSonia Arrison Aubrey de Grey, PhD Tina Seelig Justin Rattner Yvonne Cagel, Craig VenterSenior Fellow, Pacific Chairman & CSO, Exec Dir Stanford CTO, Intel Labs M.D. Founder, CEOResearch Institute SENS Foundation Tech Ventures Astronaut, Colonel- Synthetic Genomics USAF
  • Educational Programs Graduate Studies Program 10 Weeks •1x per year, 80 Rising Leaders, Focus on Team ProjectsExecutive Programs •Multiplex per year, 60-80 Participants 7 Days •For established Business, policy leaders, entrepreneurs FutureMed •1x per year, 60-80 Participants 5 Days •Focus on Future of Medicine and BiotechFuture Security •1x per year, 60-80 Participants 3-5 Days •Focus on Future of Info and Personal Security Custom •Multiplex per year, XXX ParticipantsPrograms •Tailored for specific organization (corporate, government, etc.) 1 -3 Days
  • Student Selection CriteriaThree primary Selection Criteria for students:Top in their field Demonstrated Passionate about academically Entrepreneurs/Leaders Grand Challenges GSP-2010: 80 Students / 35 countries
  • Innovation Engine10 Week Program phases:
  • Team Projects 109+Environment
  • Low Cost Sensors – The Internet Of Things
  • Artificial Intelligence – IBM’s WatsonOther applications:- healthcare- education
  • 3D Printing – Digital Fabrication
  • Robotics
  • Synthetic Biology
  • Synthetic Biology
  • Convergence
  • SU Companies2009 - 4 startups from the Team Projects2010 – 10 startups2011 – 11 startups2010 Team Project Themes:• Food for Cities – Opportunities in Controlled Environment Agriculture and Vertical Farming• Home Energy Usage – Off-the-Grid, Stand-alone, Carbon- Neutral, Residential Energy System• Upcycle – Waste Reduction and Reprocessing Waste Into Useful Products• Water – Sustainable Water Assets: Holistic Alternatives to Capital-intensive Infrastructures• Space – To Boldly Stay: Extending Humanity into the Solar System
  • ACASA - Technology• Build a 2-bedroom house in 1 ½ days with 30w of power using local materials• It is projected to cost less than half of conventional masonry.• The approach is already building 8’ walls• Proof of concept exists, the next step is to commercialize it
  • • Peer-to-peer car sharing marketplace • Average car costs $8,200/year and sits idle 92% of the time • Car sharing projected to be $6.5B industry by 2016 (Frost & Sullivan) • Patent-pending in-car technology • Seamless smartphone-driven user experience • Comprehensive nationwide insurance GETAROUND WINS 2011 TECHCRUNCH DISRUPT CUPNot for Duplication/Distribution | Copyright Salim Ismail | 2009-2011
  • Made In Space
  • SU EPO11 Participant FeedbackGrand Challenge1.4 billion in extreme poverty1 billion with no access to all-season roads
  • SU EPO11 Participant Feedback
  • SU EPO11 Participant FeedbackSolutionThe Matternet:- autonomous, electric, flying vehicles- automated ground stations- AI-driven logistics software
  • Change the World2010 – Piloted a competition– “Conceive and implement an idea to impact 1 million people around Sao Paulo”
  • Change the WorldExtraordinary results:• Time: two months• Projects created: 230• Potential impact: PRICELESS Fabio Teixeira - Winner
  • Global Impact Competitions“To win the chance to attend SU and work on projects to impact a billion people, come up with an idea that would impact a million people in your area.. and start implementing it” • 2011 – 12 students (Brazil, Israel, Russia, Israel, Palestine, Guatemala, Spain, U.S.) • 2012 – 16 Countries, 20 students
  • TakeawaysExponential Technological ChangeAbundanceDisruptive ConvergenceLook forward not backThink big - 109+ ImpactEntrepreneurial and Collaborative