Year 2 week 27 presentation
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    Year 2 week 27 presentation Year 2 week 27 presentation Presentation Transcript

    • RHS Level 2 Certificate Year 2 Week 27 – Bulbs, Hedges and revision techniques
    • Learning objective
      • 2.3 Name TEN bulbs or corms or tubers, of which FOUR should be suitable for growing in the border, FOUR for containers and FOUR for naturalizing.
      • 2.4 Describe the soil preparation, planting, routine maintenance and control of weeds, pests and diseases (aphids, slugs and snails, vine weevil, grey mould, powdery mildew ,stem or bulb eelworm) required for growing bulbs, corms or tubers.  
      • 3.10 Select and describe hedging plants for a range of functions and situations
      • 3.11 Describe a procedure for planting a hedge
      • Identify THREE active revision techniques
      • Identify TWO less effective revision techniques
    • Bulbs, corms and tubers
      • Bulb – modified stem base and fleshy food storage leaves. E.g. Narcissus ‘February Gold’
      • Corm – modified stem. E.g. Crocus tommasinianus
      • Tuber – modified root or stem. Most ornamentals are root tubers. E.g. Cyclamen hederifolium
      • All are organs of dormancy – enabling the plants to survive unsuitable conditions like cold, heat or shade ( Hyacinthoides non-scripta English Bluebell)
    • Soil preferences
      • Vary depending on the genus and species – but generally need well drained, moisture retentive, rich soil.
      • Most need good light but this varies by species– some can cope with shade by emerging in early Spring. E.g. Anemone blanda
      • Bulbs and corms planted to 2-3 times own height and 2-3 times width apart. Tubers vary – Dahlia at 15cm and Cyclamen just at ground level.
    • Maintenance
      • Watering – in containers, but otherwise not usually needed.
      • Feeding – varies by species, but all need to be able to build up food stores in the ‘bulb’ unless naturalised.
      • Careful hand weeding before foliage emerges, forks can damage the bulb, corm or tuber.
      • Protect Dahlia and Gladiolus from frost by mulching or lifting.
      • Pests – protect from slugs, aphid not a problem generally, fungal diseases, stem and bulb eelworm.
    • Naturalising bulbs and corms
      • Some bulbs and corms will if planted in the right conditions reproduce and spread as they would in their natural habitat.
      • Usually have fine leaves or leaves that have attractive patterns, so they do not look ‘messy’ when not flowering.
      • To achieve success they need to be planted as close to their natural habitat as possible.
      • For example, Anenome blanda is a woodland plant so should be planted in soil rich with organic matter in dappled shade
    • Hedges – function
      • Define boundaries
      • Divide the garden
      • Provide privacy
      • Create a windbreak
      • Create a backdrop to other planting or as a design feature themselves.
    • Choice of boundary structure Longest Shortest Varies Lifespan Medium Least Most Space Most effort initially. Low maintenance Easiest. Medium maintenance Medium effort to plant. Requires annual maintenance. Effort Most expensive Cheapest Moderate cost – Bare root Cost Wall Fence Hedge
    • Windbreaks
      • Need to be 30- 50% permeable to avoid damaging turbulence on lee side
      • Provide reduction in wind speed for up to 10 times their height.
      • Reduces wind damage to flowers and encourages pollinators
      • Reduces storm damage to plants and trees
      • Maintains humidity on lee side – reducing transpiration and evaporation.
    • Plant selection
      • Use – formal or informal hedge? Ability to stand close clipping
      • Rate of growth
      • Soil and aspect
      • Bare root or containerised? Size and time until maturity.
      • Cost.
      • Deciduous or evergreen?
    • Planting
      • Remove weeds
      • Improve soil in a strip about 90cm wide – organic matter, and balanced fertilizer (unless planting in winter).
      • Dig a trench, use a string line to get the hedge straight.
      • Trench should be just deeper than the root ball, plant as for trees (but no stakes).
      • Water in well and mulch.
    • Initial pruning and trimming
      • Initial pruning to establish desired height and to encourage bushy growth. Varies according to plant.
      • Trimming – varies in frequency and season. Use hedge trimmer or shears for small leaved and coniferous hedges and secateurs for large evergreen leaved hedges (e.g. Prunus laurocerasus Cherry Laurel).
    • Exam preparation - introduction
      • Year 2 Students Registration – complete form, fee £42, to be returned ASAP
      • Year 1 Students – aim for the Mock.
      • Revision – how to get started?
      • Revision planning – ‘if you fail to plan, you plan to fail’
      • Revision techniques – reading, remembering and ‘doing’. The more active your approach the more you will remember.
    • Revision – getting started
      • Do what you can. If you only have half an hour a day then study for half an hour.
      • Plan how you will cover the material – aim for three reviews of each topic
      • Just reading the material is not effective – try working with the information, making connections and using varied approaches
      • Little and often is better than hours on end and then nothing for days.
    • Learning outcomes
      • 2.3 Name TEN bulbs or corms or tubers, of which FOUR should be suitable for growing in the border, FOUR for containers and FOUR for naturalizing.
      • 2.4 Describe the soil preparation, planting, routine maintenance and control of weeds, pests and diseases (aphids, slugs and snails, vine weevil, grey mould, powdery mildew ,stem or bulb eelworm) required for growing bulbs, corms or tubers.  
      • 3.10 Select and describe hedging plants for a range of functions and situations
      • 3.11 Describe a procedure for planting a hedge
      • Identify THREE active revision techniques
      • Identify TWO less effective revision techniques