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Year 1 session 25 slides 2014
 

Year 1 session 25 slides 2014

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safety in the garden

safety in the garden

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    Year 1 session 25 slides 2014 Year 1 session 25 slides 2014 Presentation Transcript

    • RHS Level 2 Certificate Year 1 Session 25 – Garden Planning; Safety and Sustainability
    • Quiz answers 1. b (Redcurrant) and d. 2. a 3. Choosing trees in adjoining or same pollination group; providing a windbreak; providing two other pollinators if triploids are grown. Attracting pollinators. 4. Dwarfing (E.g. M26, MM106) 5. Strawberries suffer from build up of virus and eelworm. Rotate every 3-4 years. 6. Blackcurrants fruit best on 2-3 year old wood. Remove 1/3 of old wood every year from year three on. 7. A 8. Grey Mould Botrytis cinerea 9. Big Bud Mite 10. Plums are pruned in summer.
    • Learning objectives Garden Planning and Design 1.1.Describe how to identify potential hazards and risks on a site, including overhead and underground hazards (e.g. electric cables); unsafe buildings, features and trees; topography and existing features, e.g. watercourses and ponds 1.2 State why it is necessary to identify the existence of overhead and underground services 1.3 Describe TWO hazards associated with EACH of the following: access; slope; location of features; water; electricity; materials; plants. 1.4 State how the risks related to the hazards identified in 1.3 can be minimised by careful planning during the planning and design stage 1.5 Describe how the environmental sustainability of landscaping materials may affect choices made during the planning and design stage. 1.6 State how sustainable practices in the maintenance of a garden can be integrated successfully during the planning and design stage
    • Garden planning  Don’t think about the plants! Gardens are planned around function, form and line, then colour and texture. Choices about plants to produce the desired effect come last of all.  Important to plan in a methodical way and keep notes. In this way important issues are not overlooked.  A survey is vital but it need not be hard to do (considered in a couple of weeks).
    • Risk assessment – five stages  Identify the hazards  Identify who might be harmed and how  Evaluate the risk and identify precautions. Evaluate means consider how serious the harm might be and how likely it is to happen.  Implement precautions and record results of assessment  Review and update regularly.
    • Planning for safety  Safety considerations are an integral part of garden planning.  Common hazards are: slipping and tripping; drowning (children); skin irritation and poisoning; falls; electrocution.  These are all related to particular garden features – such as slippery paving or steep steps without handrails. Planning can minimise such hazards.
    • Hard landscaping  Paving can become slippery if algae grows on it – use texture, angle of ‘fall’ etc to control.  Uneven surfaces made up of two or more materials can create ‘toe catchers’. Planning can include avoiding such surfaces, or ensuring that they are level.  Steps can be a tripping hazard in the dark or if they are uneven in height or too steep. Planning decisions include choice of depth, gradient, handrails etc
    • Water  A drowning risk for children. However the reflection, movement and sound added to a design by water can greatly enhance a garden.  Planning can minimise the risk and keep the benefits.  For example, using a wall fountain or pebble pool, which have concealed water reservoirs, enables water to be used safely in gardens used by small children.
    • Electricity in the garden  Lights, fountain pumps, supplies to the shed and greenhouse all require electrical work in the garden.  All work should be done by a qualified electrician. Cables if buried must be armoured and their positions noted.  Planning can include using solar powered lights to avoid the need for cables, planning cable runs under lawns to avoid the possibility of them being disturbed by digging etc.
    • Plant toxicity  A common hazard in gardens is injury or poisoning by plants.  Planning can minimise this risk by identifying harmful plants and either excluding them or planting them appropriately.  For example Euphorbia sp have toxic sap and cause skin irritation. Planting taller varieties of these by a path would not be advisable as they may brush legs in passing.
    • Access for maintenance  All garden features that may require maintenance need consideration of safe access for this purpose.  Hedges need trimming, trees need pruning, and garden buildings and structures may need painting etc.  Planning decisions would include allowing access in front of hedges and around trees and buildings for a person with a ladder to work safely.
    • Sustainability in Garden Design  Basic principle – creating a beautiful, useful environment around our homes should not damage or degrade the wider environment or habitats elsewhere.  Consider the inputs (e.g. energy used), the outputs (e.g. C02) and the impact (the seriousness of any effect)  Doesn’t have to be scruffy.  Can be achieved through design.
    • Sustainability - materials  Choose materials with lowest inputs – carbon, energy, water – and longest life.  Wood – FSC certified, native wood most sustainable choice.  Stone – by-products of quarrying have lowest impact, imported stone highest.  Use recycled or re-manufactured materials instead of new, but check transport inputs.  Plants – plant according to the conditions, permanent planting has lower inputs than bedding.
    • Sustainability - maintenance  Water – plan space for a water butt, include porous hose irrigation, planting that needs minimal irrigation.  Soil improvement – plan space for a composting area if possible.  Planting – permanent planting uses fewer resources and produces less waste than temporary displays. Bedding can be minimised to reduce impacts – use of heat, water, fertilizer, transport (if bought in) etc.
    • Learning outcomes Garden Planning and Design 1.1.Describe how to identify potential hazards and risks on a site, including overhead and underground hazards (e.g. electric cables); unsafe buildings, features and trees; topography and existing features, e.g. watercourses and ponds 1.2 State why it is necessary to identify the existence of overhead and underground services 1.3 Describe TWO hazards associated with EACH of the following: access; slope; location of features; water; electricity; materials; plants. 1.4 State how the risks related to the hazards identified in 1.3 can be minimised by careful planning during the planning and design stage 1.5 Describe how the environmental sustainability of landscaping materials may affect choices made during the planning and design stage. 1.6 State how sustainable practices in the maintenance of a garden can be integrated successfully during the planning and design stage