Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
RHS Year 2 week 24
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

RHS Year 2 week 24

3,337
views

Published on

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,337
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
83
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. RHS Level 2 Certificate Week 24 – Herbaceous perennial plants and ‘bulbs’
  • 2. Learning Objectives
    • 2. Understand the choice of herbaceous perennial plants and ‘bulbs’ for display, and how to grow them
    • 2.1 Name TEN herbaceous perennial plants suitable for growing in an herbaceous border
    • 2.2 Name FIVE herbaceous perennials suitable for growing in shade and FIVE suitable for use as ground cover.
    • 2.3 Name TEN bulbs or corms or tubers, of which FOUR should be suitable for growing in the border, FOUR for containers and FOUR for naturalizing.
    • 2.4 Describe the soil preparation, planting, routine maintenance and control of weeds, pests and diseases (aphids, slugs and snails, vine weevil, grey mould, powdery mildew ,stem or bulb eelworm) required for growing herbaceous perennials and bulbs, corms or tubers.  
  • 3. Herbaceous perennials
    • ‘ Herbaceous’ – a plant with soft stems (not woody) that dies back to the base over winter.
    • Perennial – a plant that lives for many growing seasons.
    • Herbaceous perennials grown in UK are hardy – but degrees of hardiness and length of life differ between species.
  • 4. Uses in the garden
    • Classic use is in a ‘long border’
    • More modern uses in Prairie planting and in mixed borders
    • Same principles for cultivation apply in the main.
    Photo Peter Barr
  • 5. Preparing the soil for planting
    • Permanent planting – soil must be well dug, rich in organic matter, well drained
    • Single digging, incorporate garden compost or similar, firm by light treading and rake to give a level surface.
    • Consider access when planning – herbaceous perennials need regular maintenance.
  • 6. Planting 1
    • Spring or autumn – not summer or winter. Spring is usual for new plants.
    • Design – groups of 3 or 5 look more natural than dotting here and there. Taller plants towards the back, grading to the front.
    • Give the plants enough space – as far apart as their eventual height as a rule (check the label for final spread).
    • Planting hole – 2-3 times width and depth of root ball. Back fill with soil/compost mix to correct level.
  • 7. Planting 2
    • Make sure crown of plant is not covered – use a cane and put the plant in the hole to check the level.
    • Mycorrhizal fungi may help establishment.
    • Back fill in stages, firming with your hands
    • Water in well.
    • Mulch the bed once finished e.g. with well rotted manure, to retain moisture (not round Lupinus though) and only on moist soil. Draw mulch away from the crowns.
  • 8. Support
    • Taller herbaceous perennials need support to stop them falling over.
    • Put in place in Spring so they grow through and will not be broken when you put it in.
    • Plastic mesh at about half height can be stretched over block planting.
    • Hazel twigs – twisted into supports.
    • Linked metal plant supports
    • Wire ‘cages’ for bushy plants
    • Canes for tall individual plants – not easy to hide.
  • 9. Maintenance 1
    • Keep well watered until established, then in dry weather.
    • Feeding – mulch with well rotted manure, may need to apply balanced fertilizer as a top dressing in early Spring. Do not feed the Lupins!
    • Weeding – keep on top of this in Autumn and Spring. Perennial weeds can be a real problem.
  • 10. Maintenance 2
    • Deadheading – can improve flowering, mainly done to keep the display tidy.
    • Pinching out or stopping – some perennials such as Rudbeckia fulgida will be bushier and have more flowers if cut back by half in late May. Lupinus flower spikes should be removed as soon as they are finished.
    • Cutting back – either in winter once the top growth is dead, or in Spring if the seed heads etc are attractive in the Winter.
  • 11. Dividing perennials
    • Clump forming – become congested and the centre may die.
    • Splitting up rejuvenates the plant.
    • Done in Autumn (or early Spring) every 3-5 years.
    • Dig up root ball and use spade to cut into sections or two forks to lever apart. Each new plant should have 3-5 growing points.
    • Discard old or diseased parts and replant.
  • 12. Bulbs, corms and tubers
    • Bulb – modified stem base and fleshy food storage leaves. E.g. Narcissus ‘February Gold’
    • Corm – modified stem. E.g. Crocus tommasinianus
    • Tuber – modified root or stem. Most ornamentals are root tubers. E.g. Cyclamen hederifolium
    • All are organs of dormancy – enabling the plants to survive unsuitable conditions like cold, heat or shade ( Hyacinthoides non-scripta English Bluebell)
  • 13. Soil preferences
    • Vary depending on the genus and species – but generally need well drained, moisture retentive, rich soil.
    • Most need good light but this varies by species– some can cope with shade by emerging in early Spring. E.g. Anemone blanda
    • Bulbs and corms planted to 2-3 times own height and 2-3 times width apart. Tubers vary – Dahlia at 15cm and Cyclamen just at ground level.
  • 14. Maintenance
    • Watering – in containers, but otherwise not usually needed.
    • Feeding – varies by species, but all need to be able to build up food stores in the ‘bulb’.
    • Careful hand weeding before foliage emerges, forks can damage the bulb, corm or tuber.
    • Protect Dahlia and Gladiolus from frost by mulching or lifting.
    • Pests – protect from slugs, aphid not a problem generally, fungal diseases, stem and bulb eelworm.
  • 15. Learning Outcomes
    • 2. Understand the choice of herbaceous perennial plants and ‘bulbs’ for display, and how to grow them
    • 2.1 Name TEN herbaceous perennial plants suitable for growing in an herbaceous border
    • 2.2 Name FIVE herbaceous perennials suitable for growing in shade and FIVE suitable for use as ground cover.
    • 2.3 Name TEN bulbs or corms or tubers, of which FOUR should be suitable for growing in the border, FOUR for containers and FOUR for naturalizing.
    • 2.4 Describe the soil preparation, planting, routine maintenance and control of weeds, pests and diseases (aphids, slugs and snails, vine weevil, grey mould, powdery mildew ,stem or bulb eelworm) required for growing herbaceous perennials and bulbs, corms or tubers.