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RHS Year 1 session 25 slides
 

RHS Year 1 session 25 slides

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  • The only ‘low maintenance garden’ is a concrete yard!

RHS Year 1 session 25 slides RHS Year 1 session 25 slides Presentation Transcript

  • RHS Level 2 Certificate Year 1 Session 25 – Garden Planning
  • Learning outcomes
    • 1.1 State potential risks to garden users which should be considered when planning gardens.
    • 1.2 Describe a range of safety factors for a specific garden plan.
    • 1.3 State environmental protection considerations when planning a garden and how harm can be minimised through planning
    • 1.4 Describe how to appraise a garden site and the garden users requirements in preparation for the production of a plan.
    • 1.5 State the importance of existing site characteristics and features when developing a garden plan.
  • Garden planning
    • Don’t think about the plants! Gardens are planned around function, form and line, then colour and texture. Choices about plants to produce the desired effect come last of all.
    • Important to plan in a methodical way and keep notes. In this way important issues are not overlooked.
    • A survey is vital but it need not be hard to do (considered next week).
  • Planning for safety
    • Safety considerations are an integral part of garden planning.
    • Common hazards are: slipping and tripping; drowning (children); skin irritation and poisoning; falls; electrocution.
    • These are all related to particular garden features – such as slippery paving or steep steps without handrails. Planning can minimise such hazards.
  • Hard landscaping
    • Paving can become slippery if algae grows on it – this is encouraged if there is no ‘fall’ to allow water to run off the surface. Planning decisions may include using rough or textured surfaces where the paving is in shade, or using a porous surface such as gravel instead.
    • Uneven surfaces made up of two or more materials can create ‘toe catchers’ which can lead to trips. Planning can include avoiding such surfaces, or ensuring that they are level.
    • Steps can be a tripping hazard in the dark or if they are uneven in height or too steep. Planning decisions can include making sure that the steps are suitable for the gradient, including handrails or adding lights to the side of the risers.
  • Water
    • A drowning risk for children. However the reflection, movement and sound added to a design by water can greatly enhance a garden.
    • Planning can minimise the risk and keep the benefits.
    • For example, using a wall fountain or pebble pool, which have concealed water reservoirs, enables water to be used safely in gardens used by small children.
  • Electricity in the garden
    • Lights, fountain pumps, supplies to the shed and greenhouse all require electrical work in the garden.
    • All work should be done by a qualified electrician. Cables if buried must be armoured and their positions notes.
    • Planning can include using solar powered lights to avoid the need for cables, planning cable runs under lawns to avoid the possibility of them being disturbed by digging etc.
  • Plant toxicity
    • A common hazard in gardens is injury or poisoning by plants.
    • Planning can minimise this risk by identifying harmful plants and either excluding them or planting them appropriately.
    • For example Euphorbia sp have toxic sap and cause skin irritation. Planting taller varieties of these by a path would not be advisable as they may brush legs in passing.
  • Access for maintenance
    • All garden features that may require maintenance need consideration of safe access for this purpose.
    • Hedges need trimming, trees need pruning, and garden buildings and structures may need painting etc.
    • Planning decisions would include allowing access in front of hedges and around trees and buildings for a person with a ladder to work safely.
  • Site appraisal
    • A methodical review of the site and the user’s priorities and requirements
    • Use questionnaires to gather the information about the user’s needs and preferences, both functional and design.
    • Consideration of the views, aspect and climate, soil, existing features and services and a measured survey to produce a scale plan.
  • User’s Requirements
    • Who is going to use the garden? Adults, young children, older children, dogs?
    • What will it be used for? Entertaining family and friends, quiet relaxation, children’s play area? More than one of these?
    • Is it to be purely ornamental or will there be productive areas?
    • A shed? Barbeque? Car parking?
    • What style is preferred? Cottage garden, minimalist, jungle?
    • How much time is available for maintenance?
  • Site characteristics
    • Make a sketch plan and take notes – keep careful records.
    • Location and physical character– aspect, climate, micro-climates, views, slope, drainage
    • Existing features – to keep or to remove?
    • Soil – pH, depth, structure and texture. Several samples needed across the site as it will not be uniform.
  • Learning outcomes
    • 1.1 State potential risks to garden users which should be considered when planning gardens.
    • 1.2 Describe a range of safety factors for a specific garden plan.
    • 1.3 State environmental protection considerations when planning a garden and how harm can be minimised through planning
    • 1.4 Describe how to appraise a garden site and the garden users requirements in preparation for the production of a plan.
    • 1.5 State the importance of existing site characteristics and features when developing a garden plan.