RHS Level 2 Certificate Year 1  Week 13 – Propagation by seed in practice
Learning outcomes <ul><li>1.1 Describe how conditions for successful germination can be achieved in a protected environmen...
Seed propagation in a protected environment <ul><li>Control of the environment means that the germination conditions can b...
Practical steps to control germination environment A basic requirement of any propagation Cultural hygiene To provide the ...
Equipment <ul><li>Containers – seed trays, modular trays, seed pans, Jiffy 7’s, root trainers. </li></ul><ul><li>Propagato...
Sowing seeds in a modular tray <ul><li>Used for those plants which resent root disturbance </li></ul><ul><li>No need to pr...
Pricking out <ul><li>Required for seeds that have been grown in a seed tray. </li></ul><ul><li>Moves the seedlings from th...
Seed propagation outdoors <ul><li>Used for hardy annuals, hardy perennials and many vegetables. </li></ul><ul><li>Cultivat...
Plant examples <ul><li>Hardy annuals usually sown direct into the ground –  Papaver rhoeas  ‘Shirley Series’,  Clarkia amo...
Learning outcomes <ul><li>1.1  Describe how conditions for successful germination can be achieved in a protected environme...
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RHS Level 2 Year 1 Week 13

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Practical propagation by seed

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RHS Level 2 Year 1 Week 13

  1. 1. RHS Level 2 Certificate Year 1 Week 13 – Propagation by seed in practice
  2. 2. Learning outcomes <ul><li>1.1 Describe how conditions for successful germination can be achieved in a protected environment. </li></ul><ul><li>1.2 Describe the sowing and aftercare of a range of seed types sown in containers. </li></ul><ul><li>1.3 Describe how the conditions for successful germination can be achieved in the open. </li></ul><ul><li>1.4 Describe the sowing and aftercare of a range of seed types sown outdoors. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Seed propagation in a protected environment <ul><li>Control of the environment means that the germination conditions can be optimised </li></ul><ul><li>Important factors in this control are the choice of growing medium, water supply, use of a propagator or heat pad, mist bench use and cultural hygiene. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Practical steps to control germination environment A basic requirement of any propagation Cultural hygiene To provide the light conditions needed to germinate. Light – use vermiculite or compost to cover seeds unless they need light to germinate. To allow soil temperature to be controlled Use of heated propagator or heat pad Reduces the risk of ‘damping off’ Supply of clean water – not rain water Allows oxygen to enter the soil whilst holding water. Sterile compost reduces the risk of ‘damping off’ diseases. Use of sterile, moisture retentive, free draining seed compost
  5. 5. Equipment <ul><li>Containers – seed trays, modular trays, seed pans, Jiffy 7’s, root trainers. </li></ul><ul><li>Propagator – may be a simple plastic cover for a seed tray or a more sophisticated heated unit. Conserves humidity and temperature. </li></ul><ul><li>Heat pad – thermostatically controlled and placed under the seed tray. </li></ul><ul><li>Mist bench – commercial use, provides heating and misting. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Sowing seeds in a modular tray <ul><li>Used for those plants which resent root disturbance </li></ul><ul><li>No need to prick out so less labour intensive </li></ul><ul><li>Takes up more space for fewer plants </li></ul><ul><li>Unlike seed trays they tend not to be re-useable. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Pricking out <ul><li>Required for seeds that have been grown in a seed tray. </li></ul><ul><li>Moves the seedlings from the seed tray into individual modules or pots to grow on. </li></ul><ul><li>Requires a degree of care and skill. </li></ul><ul><li>Must be done at the right stage of growth or the seedlings will become crowded and ‘leggy’ and there is the risk of fungal disease. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Seed propagation outdoors <ul><li>Used for hardy annuals, hardy perennials and many vegetables. </li></ul><ul><li>Cultivation – the aim is to produce a fine tilth </li></ul><ul><li>For ornamentals unlikely to need additional fertilizer </li></ul><ul><li>Use of the Stale Seed Bed technique to reduce competition from weeds </li></ul><ul><li>Sow either broadcast or in drills – the latter makes it easier to see which are weed seedlings. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep watered and weeded, thin out to final spacing, provide support and dead head ornamentals as the season progresses to prolong the display </li></ul>
  9. 9. Plant examples <ul><li>Hardy annuals usually sown direct into the ground – Papaver rhoeas ‘Shirley Series’, Clarkia amoena , Centaurea cyanus (Cornflower). </li></ul><ul><li>Biennials often direct sown – Verbascum olympicum, Digitalis purpurea, Myosotis sylvatica. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Learning outcomes <ul><li>1.1 Describe how conditions for successful germination can be achieved in a protected environment. </li></ul><ul><li>1.2 Describe the sowing and aftercare of a range of seed types sown in containers. </li></ul><ul><li>1.3 Describe how the conditions for successful germination can be achieved in the open. </li></ul><ul><li>1.4 Describe the sowing and aftercare of a range of seed types sown outdoors. </li></ul>

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