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Rhs level 2 certificate year 1 week 28 presentation

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  • 1. RHS Level 2 Certificate Week 28 – Garden Design. Hard and soft landscaping.
  • 2. Quiz
    • Twenty minutes – test conditions. I will collect in and mark for next session.
    • Remember that next week is half term – next session is on 9 th June.
  • 3. Learning outcomes
    • 1.1 Describe how garden size and shape may affect the style of design chosen.
    • 1.2 Describe the factors to consider when planning a garden for a named function.
    • 1.3 Prepare a sketch plan of a garden identifying features suitable for specific functions.
    • 1.4 Describe how planning may contribute towards the development of specific microclimates within a garden.
    • 2. Hard and soft landscaping
    • 2.1 List a range of hard landscaping materials used in garden planning
    • 2.2 Describe a range of hard landscaping materials in garden planning.
    • 2.3 State the aesthetic considerations which should be made when choosing hard landscaping materials.
    • 2.4 Describe how the choice of soft landscaping for a site may be affected by environmental factors.
  • 4. Garden size and shape and design considerations
    • Very small gardens need very simple designs. Not necessarily tiny plants and features though. More suited to a formal design.
    • Very large gardens may be broken up into different ‘rooms’ by hedges to allow more intimate spaces to be produced. A single large scale design is hard to create.
    • Long narrow gardens – use of angles across the space, interrupted sight lines and variety of height to avoid creating a dull corridor.
  • 5. A garden for children - considerations
    • Safety – soft paths and areas around play equipment; suitable non-toxic plants.
    • Maintenance – must be tough and not require regular repair. Solid structures and tough plants.
    • Space for play – imaginative play or sports? One would favour hiding places and open areas and the other the provision of equipment and space for structured activity.
  • 6. Microclimates and planning
    • How can a warm, humid microclimate be created? By planting overstory trees or shrubs and adding water. Layers of planting create micro-climates.
    • Walls create microclimates that are warmer than the wider environment.
    • Shelter creates microclimates – semi-permeable windbreaks raise temperature and humidity.
    • Water can create a micro-climate – a wet area or pond with suitable plants will provide the conditions for insects and invertebrates to thrive.
  • 7. Hard Landscaping
    • Refers to everything that is not living in the garden.
    • A wide range of choices of varying cost, difficulty of construction, maintenance requirements and appearance.
    • The choice will be partly dictated by the style of the design – so rough stone walls are more likely to be found in a cottage garden and polished steel in a formal, modern garden.
  • 8. Hard landscaping – horizontal surfaces Mulch, soft surface for children’s play areas, paths Rough, can be any colour. Recycled materials. Rubber granules Can be load bearing depending on base. Used for paths and driveways. A range of different natural stone colours available. Rough visual texture. Gravel Can bear load depending on quality chosen and depth of base. Used for driveways (N.B: must now be porous), patios and paths Natural stone colours. Flat surface- but may have ridged or riven texture. Laid in formal grid, in mix of different sizes or ‘crazy paving’ Paving slabs or stone Not for heavy loads. Entertaining space or seating areas. Grooved decking is less likely to become slippery. Can be painted or stained to any colour. Wooden decking Function Appearance Material
  • 9. Hard landscaping - barriers As above. Colour will depend on source. Can be smooth and squared or rough. Stone As above but also to divide the garden and to make raised planting areas and retaining walls. Bricks come in a variety of colours and many colours are local to an area (Cambridgeshire White). Surface may be textured or smooth. Brick - wall Define garden boundaries; provide security. If semi-permeable may provide windbreaks for productive areas. Depends on variety chosen, can be vertical or horizontal strips of wood. Painted or stained to any colour Wood – fence panels Function Appearance Material
  • 10. Soft Landscaping
    • The term refers to the plants and living elements of the garden.
    • Chosen to suit the design and the conditions.
    • There are so many ornamental plants that it is better to decide on the design and effect required and then decide on the plants that produce it best in the conditions that apply.
  • 11. Plants for purposes
    • To provide a focal point
    • To provide structure year round
    • To provide seasonal interest
    • To provide changing colour and texture combinations as the seasons change.
  • 12. Plants for particular conditions
    • Sun
    • Shade
    • Acid soil
    • Alkaline soil
    • Exposed positions e.g. by the coast or by a busy road
  • 13. Learning Outcomes
    • 1.1 Describe how garden size and shape may affect the style of design chosen.
    • 1.2 Describe the factors to consider when planning a garden for a named function.
    • 1.3 Prepare a sketch plan of a garden identifying features suitable for specific functions.
    • 1.4 Describe how planning may contribute towards the development of specific microclimates within a garden.
    • 2. Hard and soft landscaping
    • 2.1 List a range of hard landscaping materials used in garden planning
    • 2.2 Describe a range of hard landscaping materials in garden planning.
    • 2.3 State the aesthetic considerations which should be made when choosing hard landscaping materials.
    • 2.4 Describe how the choice of soft landscaping for a site may be affected by environmental factors.