Rhs level 2 certificate week 25 2012

  • 1,681 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,681
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
31
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. RHS Level 2 Certificate Year 1 Week 25 – Garden planning: site and user requirements. Revision techniques.
  • 2. Learning Objectives Site Appraisal 1.1 Describe potential restrictions which may limit work on the site, including financial constraints; difficulties with access for plant, equipment and materials; topography (degree and extent of slopes); boundary constraints; and restrictions on the time the works can be carried out. 1.2 State what existing garden features need to be identified, including buildings, hard landscape features, and the trees and plants that are to be retained. Plants 2.1 Name FIVE evergreen and FIVE deciduous trees (large shrubs), suitable for planting in a domestic garden. State details of their decorative merits, height and spread and site requirements; describe a situation where each could be used effectively. Revision Identify THREE active revision techniques Identify TWO less effective revision techniques
  • 3. Site appraisal A methodical review of the site and the user’s priorities and requirements Use questionnaires to gather the information about the user’s needs and preferences, both functional and design. Consideration of the views, aspect and climate, soil, existing features and services and a measured survey to produce a scale plan.
  • 4. Site characteristics Make a sketch plan and take notes – keep careful records. Location and physical character– aspect, climate, micro-climates, views, slope, drainage Existing features – to keep or to remove? Soil – pH, depth, structure and texture. Several samples needed across the site as it will not be uniform.
  • 5. Environmental factors in design Prevailing wind – where should windbreaks go? Aspect – where does the sun fall at different times of day? Where should seating areas be positioned, what need for shade is there? Views – borrow favourable views and hide ugly ones. Views into the garden – creating privacy Soil – pH (hard to change and will therefore affect what can be planted); depth (if insufficient then raised beds can be used).
  • 6. Limitations on design process Budget – a properly defined and controlled budget prevents failure to complete Access – lack of access for machinery or deliveries will impact on what can be achieved; better to design with this in mind. Boundary constraints – ownership, planning restrictions etc. Timing – for excavations and building works; planting etc. The design process should include a plan for implementation.
  • 7. User requirements What, Why, Where, When and Who? (not necessarily in that order). Need to be selective – priorities set to avoid unrealistic use of space Once requirements are established the areas of use can be plotted onto the plan (quiet area, productive area etc) as can the circulation routes that people are likely to take.
  • 8. Exam Preparation - introduction Registration – complete form, fee, to be returned ASAP. Revision – how to get started? Revision planning – ‘if you fail to plan, you plan to fail’ Revision techniques – reading, remembering and ‘doing’. The more active your approach the more you will remember. Get started now!
  • 9. Revision – Getting Started Do what you can. If you only have half an hour a day then study for half an hour. Plan how you will cover the material – aim for three reviews of each topic Just reading the material is not effective – try working with the information, making connections and using varied approaches Little and often is better than hours on end and then nothing for days.
  • 10. Learning outcomes Site Appraisal 1.1 Describe potential restrictions which may limit work on the site, including financial constraints; difficulties with access for plant, equipment and materials; topography (degree and extent of slopes); boundary constraints; and restrictions on the time the works can be carried out. 1.2 State what existing garden features need to be identified, including buildings, hard landscape features, and the trees and plants that are to be retained. Plants 2.1 Name FIVE evergreen and FIVE deciduous trees (large shrubs), suitable for planting in a domestic garden. State details of their decorative merits, height and spread and site requirements; describe a situation where each could be used effectively. Revision Identify THREE active revision techniques Identify TWO less effective revision techniques