Rhs level 2 certificate week 25 2012
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Rhs level 2 certificate week 25 2012

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Rhs level 2 certificate week 25 2012 Rhs level 2 certificate week 25 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • RHS Level 2 Certificate Year 1 Week 25 – Garden planning: site and user requirements. Revision techniques.
  • Learning Objectives Site Appraisal 1.1 Describe potential restrictions which may limit work on the site, including financial constraints; difficulties with access for plant, equipment and materials; topography (degree and extent of slopes); boundary constraints; and restrictions on the time the works can be carried out. 1.2 State what existing garden features need to be identified, including buildings, hard landscape features, and the trees and plants that are to be retained. Plants 2.1 Name FIVE evergreen and FIVE deciduous trees (large shrubs), suitable for planting in a domestic garden. State details of their decorative merits, height and spread and site requirements; describe a situation where each could be used effectively. Revision Identify THREE active revision techniques Identify TWO less effective revision techniques
  • Site appraisal A methodical review of the site and the user’s priorities and requirements Use questionnaires to gather the information about the user’s needs and preferences, both functional and design. Consideration of the views, aspect and climate, soil, existing features and services and a measured survey to produce a scale plan. View slide
  • Site characteristics Make a sketch plan and take notes – keep careful records. Location and physical character– aspect, climate, micro-climates, views, slope, drainage Existing features – to keep or to remove? Soil – pH, depth, structure and texture. Several samples needed across the site as it will not be uniform. View slide
  • Environmental factors in design Prevailing wind – where should windbreaks go? Aspect – where does the sun fall at different times of day? Where should seating areas be positioned, what need for shade is there? Views – borrow favourable views and hide ugly ones. Views into the garden – creating privacy Soil – pH (hard to change and will therefore affect what can be planted); depth (if insufficient then raised beds can be used).
  • Limitations on design process Budget – a properly defined and controlled budget prevents failure to complete Access – lack of access for machinery or deliveries will impact on what can be achieved; better to design with this in mind. Boundary constraints – ownership, planning restrictions etc. Timing – for excavations and building works; planting etc. The design process should include a plan for implementation.
  • User requirements What, Why, Where, When and Who? (not necessarily in that order). Need to be selective – priorities set to avoid unrealistic use of space Once requirements are established the areas of use can be plotted onto the plan (quiet area, productive area etc) as can the circulation routes that people are likely to take.
  • Exam Preparation - introduction Registration – complete form, fee, to be returned ASAP. Revision – how to get started? Revision planning – ‘if you fail to plan, you plan to fail’ Revision techniques – reading, remembering and ‘doing’. The more active your approach the more you will remember. Get started now!
  • Revision – Getting Started Do what you can. If you only have half an hour a day then study for half an hour. Plan how you will cover the material – aim for three reviews of each topic Just reading the material is not effective – try working with the information, making connections and using varied approaches Little and often is better than hours on end and then nothing for days.
  • Learning outcomes Site Appraisal 1.1 Describe potential restrictions which may limit work on the site, including financial constraints; difficulties with access for plant, equipment and materials; topography (degree and extent of slopes); boundary constraints; and restrictions on the time the works can be carried out. 1.2 State what existing garden features need to be identified, including buildings, hard landscape features, and the trees and plants that are to be retained. Plants 2.1 Name FIVE evergreen and FIVE deciduous trees (large shrubs), suitable for planting in a domestic garden. State details of their decorative merits, height and spread and site requirements; describe a situation where each could be used effectively. Revision Identify THREE active revision techniques Identify TWO less effective revision techniques