Introduction to garden planning and design session 5

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plants in design

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Introduction to garden planning and design session 5

  1. 1. Introduction to GardenPlanning and DesignWeek 5 – ‘At Last – Plants!’ Choosingand using plants in design
  2. 2. Learning objectives 1.1 Choices in soft landscaping - seasons of interest,colour, texture, contrast. State advantages and disadvantages of ‘instantgardening’ with mature plants State three uses of soft landscaping in design. Relate soft landscaping to the design principlesin Week 3 2. Selecting plants for seasonal interest 2.1 State types of plants for different seasons of interest(including bulbs and corms; shrubs; herbaceous perennialsand grasses). State three ways of establishing contrast in planting 2.3 Layering planting - plant groups as units in design 3. Finding out about plants - State three sources of information about plants State four factors that must be taken into considerationwhen selecting plants for use in a given design.
  3. 3. Grid and theme drawings Did you find using a grid to createshapes, rather than worrying about agarden design as such, useful? What did you find most difficult? How could you have changed this tomake it easier? Why have you made the designchoices you have? Previously used,budget dictated etc?
  4. 4. Plants in design Provide part of the design – addingcolour, form, texture, volume. Can beused to create rhythm, symmetry andbalance. Thousands of ornamental plants –choose the effect required and thenfind the plants. The effect changes with the seasonsand the plants must suit the soil,aspect etc in the garden.
  5. 5. Design principles - reminder Scale/proportion Balance Rhythm Line and shape Colour Texture Simplicity Styles?
  6. 6. Planting effects and styles Plants in design are not consideredindividually. Various planting styles – Mixed Border;Prairie; Drift or ‘River’; formal bedding;Cottage Garden. Different groups of plants used in each style. Some styles lend themselves more easily toformality, some to informality. Selecting combinations of plants that can berepeated simplifies planting and can add tothe unity of the design
  7. 7. Combination planting
  8. 8. Drift Planting
  9. 9. Layering planting Plants grow through and over each other andare different heights. They also have decorative ‘high points’ atdifferent times. These features allow you to build contrast,balance, rhythm and movement into yourdesign and add height and vertical interest. Layering starts by choosing ‘anchor’ plantsthat have structure and colour or interest allyear round and have height. Then to provide contrast add plants that growto differing heights which contrast or tone incolour with each other and provide differingtextures.
  10. 10. Seasonal planting Plants change through the year – sothis needs to be taken into account inthe design. Planting seasonally means you canhave interest in your design all yearround from the soft landscaping. When choosing plants try to have somethat flower or have interesting bark,shape or texture in each season of theyear.
  11. 11. Types of plant for seasonal interest Winter – need not be a ‘dead’ season. Woody plantsoften have coloured bark or good structure andtexture. Evergreens provide a backdrop. Bulbs are agood choice – Snowdrops begin flowering in January.The dead stems of grasses and some perennialsprovide structure. Spring – More bulbs, spring flowering perennials andshrubs, young growth on all plants. Summer – herbaceous perennials and floweringclimbers, roses, bedding – the choice is yours! Autumn – later flowering perennials, trees andshrubs with good autumn colour, fruits andseedheads and the mature stems of ornamentalgrasses.
  12. 12. Finding out about plants What? Colour and season(s) of interest,shape and texture. Mature height andspread. Soil and location preferences.Maintenance requirements How? Books, the internet, garden visits, whatgrows well in the neighbourhood Recording – in your notebook, photos (butsort and note these), on your layout plan(colour and shape etc only) The details goonto the planting plan. Note combinations as well as individualplants.
  13. 13. Learning outcomes 1.1 Choices in soft landscaping - seasons of interest,colour, texture, contrast. State advantages and disadvantages of‘instant gardening’ with mature plants State three uses of soft landscaping in design. Relate soft landscaping to the designprinciples in Week 3 2. Selecting plants for seasonal interest 2.1 State types of plants for different seasons of interest(including bulbs and corms; shrubs; herbaceousperennials and grasses). State three ways of establishing contrast in planting 2.3 Layering planting - plant groups as units in design 3. Finding out about plants - State three sources of information about plants State four factors that must be taken into considerationwhen selecting plants for use in a given design.

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